83 episodes

Brought to you by Nils Davis and Rob McGrorty, this podcast will help you become a better Product Manager, Marketer, Innovator, or Entrepreneur. Through interviews with prominent guests, original thought content, and tough questions, this podcast will tackle problems ranging from finding and validating market problems, to creating innovative solutions, to taking those solutions to market. Simply put, it will help you move your skills - and your products - to the next level.

All The Responsibility, None Of The Authority Podcast by Nils Davi‪s‬ Nils Davis

    • Marketing
    • 5.0 • 14 Ratings

Brought to you by Nils Davis and Rob McGrorty, this podcast will help you become a better Product Manager, Marketer, Innovator, or Entrepreneur. Through interviews with prominent guests, original thought content, and tough questions, this podcast will tackle problems ranging from finding and validating market problems, to creating innovative solutions, to taking those solutions to market. Simply put, it will help you move your skills - and your products - to the next level.

    81: Kristy Olinger on Communication, Radical Transparency, and A Growth Mindset

    81: Kristy Olinger on Communication, Radical Transparency, and A Growth Mindset

    Kristy Olinger – Communication Guru







    I met Kristy Olinger a few months ago, introduced by our mutual friend Greg Prickril (a guest on the podcast last year). We immediately hit it off and I knew she’d be a great guest for the podcast.







    In her day job Kristy is a product manager for credit card offerings at Citizens Bank. On the side she has her own podcast, “The Opposite of Small Talk“, and presents online trainings, workshops, and keynotes through KO Communication. She also runs a mean Instagram game under ko.communication.







    In this episode she gives us some insights on how to improve your communication skills at work, including how to engage difficult stakeholders using the familiarity principle, and how to disrupt a disruptor. Underlying a lot of her communication guidance is what she calls “Radical Transparency.”







    We also talked a bit about strengths (a topic I’ve spent a few recent episodes on) and their relationship to the idea of a growth mindset, and a book she recommends called The Fire Starter Sessions by Danielle LaPorte, and her concept of “ease,” which is closely related to the idea behind strengths.







    Links to books, podcasts, and sites we mentioned in the episode







    * More on The Mere-Exposure Effect aka The Familiarity Principle of Attraction* The Happier Podcast from Gretchen Rubin.* Compelling People, by John Neffinger and Matthew Kohut.* The Fire Starter Sessions, by Danielle LaPorte* Mindset, by Carol Dweck, the bible on the “growth mindset” (and its opposite, the fixed mindset). * Kristy’s courses and workshops, including Consensus Creator, Kristy’s new online short course.* Kristy’s “free stuff” – a great collection of resources on communication, relationships, and having more effective meetings.* Kristy on Instagram (ko.communication)







    Don’t forget to subscribe!







    If you want to help me out, and more importantly, help other product managers find and enjoy this podcast, please subscribe on your podcast system of choice. And consider giving me a review on iTunes or “starring” the episode on your player.

    • 35 min
    80: How To Make A Name For Yourself As A Junior Product Manager

    80: How To Make A Name For Yourself As A Junior Product Manager

    “How Can I Make A Name For Myself As A Junior Product Manager?”







    This episode arose from a question I got in a recent Clubhouse session:







    Q: How can I make a name for myself as a new junior product manager?







    I have an earlier episode on this (#72 – “Proven Ways Deliver Value Fast In Your New PM Job Even If You Don’t Know Anything”), but I also have some new thoughts I want to put into this episode.







    That episode was generic advice, applicable to anyone. In this episode I focus more on how to use your individual differentiators – including how to find your individual differentiators – as the basis for creating a name for yourself.







    Links







    * Clifton Strengthsfinder site, including links to both the lower cost 5-Strengths product and the full 34 Strengths product.* Lisa Cummings’ podcast Lead Through Strengths and her resource page that includes online trainings. * A few more of my earlier podcast episodes: Product Managers are Unicorns, and my Imposter Syndrome episode which also talks about strengths.







    My (currently free) “Tell Your Story” online training







    * Go to https://alltheresponsibility.com/stories to sign up for my online course.







    Support the podcast







    * If you like this podcast and want to support it, consider becoming a patron on my Patreon page.* Or, review and rate the podcast on iTunes.* But the easiest and fastest (and cheapest) way to support the podcast is to leave me a comment or question, or drop one into my Twitter mentions (I’m @nilsdavis), or just send me an email at nils@nilsdavis.com.



    “How Can I Make A Name For Myself As A Junior Product Manager?”







    This episode arose from a question I got in a recent Clubhouse session:







    Q: How can I make a name for myself as a new junior product manager?







    I have an earlier episode on this (#72 – “Proven Ways Deliver Value Fast In Your New PM Job Even If You Don’t Know Anything”), but I also have some new thoughts I want to put into this episode.







    That episode was generic advice, applicable to anyone. In this episode I focus more on how to use your individual differentiators – including how to find your individual differentiators – as the basis for creating a name for yourself.







    Links

    • 29 min
    79: Carlos Gonzalez de Villaumbrosia Solved His Own Problem

    79: Carlos Gonzalez de Villaumbrosia Solved His Own Problem

    Carlos Gonzalez de Villaumbrosia solved his own problem with Product School







    In our interview, Carlos Gonzalez de Villaumbrosia recounts what led him to create Product School back in 2014. It started as a one-many enterprise, and a first class of eight people. His goal? Helping others learn the product management skills and mindset he’d had to cobble together on his own.







    Essentially, Product School was what he wished he’d had when he started in product management.







    Since that first class of eight, the rise of Product School has been meteoric. Over 20,000 students have gone through its programs.







    And at this point Product School is the global leader in product management training with a community of over one million product professionals. Product School instructors are real-world Product Leaders working at top companies including Google, Facebook, Netflix, Airbnb, PayPal, Uber, and Amazon.







    This interview was fun for me because Carlos, in addition to being a leader in product management thinking and a huge influencer on product management, is just a delight to talk with.







    Links mentioned by Carlos







    * The Product School website, where you can find hundreds of free resources, as well as information about your options for attending Product School, which is now 100% virtual. (You can attend from anywhere!)* The brand new Future of Product Management Report from Product School.* And his great book The Product Book – a great overview of product management.* Carlos’ LinkedIn profile.* An old episode from this podcast about how Rob McGrorty and I learned product management (we didn’t get to go to Product School, even though Rob taught there for a while!)







    Support the podcast







    * If you like this podcast and want to support it, consider becoming a patron on my Patreon page.* Or, review and rate the podcast on iTunes.* But the easiest and fastest (and cheapest) way to support the podcast is to leave me a comment or question, or drop one into my Twitter mentions (I’m @nilsdavis), or just send me an email at nils@nilsdavis.com.











    Carlos Gonzalez de Villaumbrosia solved his own problem with Product School







    In our interview, Carlos Gonzalez de Villaumbrosia recounts what led him to create Product School back in 2014. It started as a one-many enterprise, and a first class of eight people. His goal? Helping others learn the product management skills and mindset he’d had to cobble together on his own.







    Essentially, Product School was what he wished he’d had when he started in product management.







    Since that first class of eight, the rise of Product School has been meteoric. Over 20,

    • 34 min
    78: Done And Gets Things Smart

    78: Done And Gets Things Smart

    This episode is a little trip down memory lane for me, as I recount two very influential articles about software engineering I read in the 2000s. But their influence extended far beyond software engineering, to product management and understanding how products can be successful.







    Links







    * Rub-a-Dub-Dub, by Joel Spolsky* The Guerilla Guide To Interviewing, by Joel Spolsky* Done and Gets Things Smart, by Steve Yegge







    My new course on storytelling – free for podcast listeners







    * Tell Your Story Online Class – free for the first 50 podcast listeners who sign up, normally $49.99. In the course you learn to tell your own stories – which will definitely help you get that next job and differentiate you from other candidates. And, bonus! – those same skills, the structure, the tips, the questions you ask to find the good story material – they are totally applicable to all the times you need to tell stories as a product manager, product marketer, or founder. Whether you’re pitching for new funding, or trying to convince a prospect to become a customer, or handling sales objections – the storytelling you learn in this course will be directly applicable.







    Sidebar on Jeff Dean facts







    There are pages and pages of “Jeff Dean Facts”, that come in the same form as the well-known Chuck Norris facts like:







    * Once a cobra bit Chuck Norris’ leg. After five days of excruciating pain, the cobra died.







    My favorite Jeff Dean facts are:







    * Compilers don’t warn Jeff Dean. Jeff Dean warns compilers.* Jeff Dean is still waiting for mathematicians to discover the joke he hid in the digits of Pi.* Google search went down for a few hours in 2002, and Jeff Dean started handling queries by hand. Search Quality doubled.







    These should give you some idea about the legend of Jeff Dean as a programmer – and this is the kind of person Steve Yegge was talking about in Done and Gets Things Smart.







    More







    * The “shooting script” for this episode – not quite a transcript, but close.* Would you like personalized advice and guidance on how to apply the ideas I share in this podcast? I provide 1-on-1 coaching and consulting to help product managers and marketers ignite their careers. To try it out, sign up for a free coaching session.* My book, The Secret Product Manager Handbook, is full of great information and tools for product...

    • 26 min
    77: 2020 Retrospective – What Went Well, What Could Have Been Better

    77: 2020 Retrospective – What Went Well, What Could Have Been Better

    2020 Retrospective Thoughts







    The end of the year always prompts thoughts and reflections on what went down, what was worth celebrating, and where tweaks or even overhauls are needed.







    In this episode I talk about retrospectives and how to do them (and why), and then I dive into this podcast’s 2020. There were highs and lows, but in general, I think the podcast has been a worthwhile endeavor for me that I will continue doing.







    Various resources I mentioned in the episode







    * The freebie bonus download of 5 tips to unleash the astounding power of retrospectives.* Research on the value of retrospectives by Scott Tannenbaum and Christopher Cerasoli* My article “To 10x Your Profits Start With Retrospectives“* Tim Ferriss’s Past Year Review article (I mistakenly called it “Year in Review” in the episode)* My previous podcast episodes about retrospectives: * 2016: Retrospectives – What Went Well, What We Could Do Better* 2019: Retrospectives Should Be A No-Brainer







    The script for this episode







    As I mentioned in the episode, most of my podcasts these days are pre-scripted, although I do go “off book” on occasion. So, instead of getting the show transcribed, I just provide the script if it’s clean enough.







    * Script for episode 77: 2020 Retrospective







    Subscribe, Rate, ​Review







    You can subscribe to the podcast using the buttons below, or the ones over to the right. The great benefit of subscribing is that you’ll get new episodes automatically when I release them.







    If you like the show, please consider rating the podcast at Rate This Podcast (the link is for this podcast).







    You can also rate and review the podcast on iTunes, or click the Recommend button in your podcast player of choice. Your recommendations help other product managers and innovators find the podcast. It really helps me out and spreads the word. Of course, you can also share the podcast with your friends and colleagues directly!







    I’d ​Love ​To ​Hear ​From ​You!







    Please leave a comment below or drop me an email at nils@nilsdavis.com.







    Support the Podcast







    You can buy my book, The Secret Product Manager Handbook, available in Kindle and paperback. It’s great for new product managers, and I’m told that some leaders of product management orgs by copies for their team members.







    And if you’re really a big fan, you can support the podcast by donating on my Patreon page. There are several levels of support available – but any amount is amazing.

    • 25 min
    76: How Product Managers Can Build Psychological Safety In Their Teams

    76: How Product Managers Can Build Psychological Safety In Their Teams

    What is “psychological safety?”







    Organizational behavioral scientist Amy Edmondson of Harvard first introduced the construct of “team psychological safety” and defined it as “a shared belief held by members of a team that the team is safe for interpersonal risk taking.” 







    Basically, it’s the idea that people on a team can speak up without being judged or ridiculed. In short, psychological safety means, “Can we take risks on this team without feeling insecure or embarrassed?”







    And it turns out, as Google discovered in a research project called Project Aristotle, that, contrary to their initial expectations, the makeup of a team had very little to do with its effectiveness. Instead, how the team members interact has a much, much bigger impact. And of all the factors they studied, psychological safety was the biggest contributor to team effectiveness.







    This podcast episode was proximately inspired by reading about psychological safety in Ozan Varol’s new book Think Like A Rocket Scientist. He talks about psychological safety in the context of building space missions – and other major projects.







    One idea that came to mind while I was reading that section was that as product managers we often have to act as our own little “team of one” – me, myself, and I! And within that team of one we need psychological safety.







    So, this episode is about how we as product managers can contribute to the psychological safety of the “real” teams we work on – our dev team, our team of product managers – and also our “team of one.”







    Building psychological safety with your team







    * Praise the developers and testers (all the team members!) even for just showing up.* Praise experimentation and asking questions (even dumb ones!)* Encourage team members to try new things* Remember that people are doing their best* No blaming! (I go into this in detail in the episode.)* Understand that you can be a “spiritual shepherd” for the team – not in a woo-woo way, but because only healthy teams are effective over time – which means able to deliver your vision to market effectively.







    Building psychological safety in your “team of one”







    * No blame – I don’t blame myself, even if I do take responsibility for my actions and decisions and mistakes* Praise (myself) for taking a chance or going out on a limb* Recognition (of me) for just showing up, because sometimes that’s hard enough* This has been especially true this last year, not that I’ve hard it at all hard compared to many, many people.* Understand that I’m going as fast as I can* This releases me from the impediments of my beliefs* Being willing to question anything, even if (you fear that) it makes you look dumb* And all the other things I mentioned earlier when interacting with your team.







    Links







    * Ozan Varol’s Think Like A Rocket Scientist* Amy Edmondson’s TEDx talk about psychological safety* My previous podcast episodes, that I mention during the show:* a href="https://alltheresponsibility.

    • 24 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
14 Ratings

14 Ratings

KJO192837 ,

Ep 76 - a must listen!

Just finished episode 76 and it’s a must listen for teams. Psychological safety is so important and Nils gives product team specific examples for how this can break down and how it can be built up. Worth a listen and to share with your teams.

Beta fish! ,

A must listen for product managers

Whether you’re a veteran PM or just starting out, Nils and Rob cover all the challenges faced by PMs today. Every episode finished with three things you can do today to take action. Nils and Rob are passionate about their craft and it shows. Definitely worth your attention.

SFPM0101 ,

Product Manager

Like great art, what matters in a podcast is the effect it has on you. All the Responsibility makes you think, reflect, and stay excited. Keep it coming!

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