12 episodes

A podcast from the Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD) that shares real stories from network members who are working to change systems and structures that impact people with disabilities. Each AUCD Network Narratives episode features a conversation about experiences at a LEND, UCEDD or IDDRC, especially highlighting emerging leaders and the voices of BIPOC disabled people and their families. We aim to energize AUCD network members to take action in their own communities. View all episodes and transcripts at http://www.aucd.org/podcast

AUCD Network Narratives AUCD

    • Education
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

A podcast from the Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD) that shares real stories from network members who are working to change systems and structures that impact people with disabilities. Each AUCD Network Narratives episode features a conversation about experiences at a LEND, UCEDD or IDDRC, especially highlighting emerging leaders and the voices of BIPOC disabled people and their families. We aim to energize AUCD network members to take action in their own communities. View all episodes and transcripts at http://www.aucd.org/podcast

    Season 1 Wrap Up

    Season 1 Wrap Up

    Join Jeiri, as she thanks you for tuning in to Season 1 of the AUCD Network Narratives podcast. Jeiri reflects on what the 1st season has had in stores and what's to come in season 2.

    AUCD Network has had the pleasure of hearing amazing stories from members and insights on ways we to work together to help advocate and educate the community at large.

    View all episodes and transcripts at http://www.aucd.org/podcast

    This episode was funded by the Administration for Community Living through technical assistance contract # HHSP233201600066C. The contents do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Administration on Community Living, US Department of Health and Human Services, or the US Government.

    • 3 min
    Understanding the Experiences of Black Mothers in the Disability Community

    Understanding the Experiences of Black Mothers in the Disability Community

    Representation is essential in advocacy work and the push for legislation. When it comes to autism and disability advocacy, listening, engaging, and understanding the experiences of people of color is crucial to changing the narrative. Elizabeth Morgan joins the show to help us understand the importance of connecting with stories of people of color with disabilities and their families.
    Elizabeth is an Assistant Professor in Educational Leadership at the University of California, Sacramento, and program coordinator for the CED at the Mind Institute. Her area of research includes early childhood and early intervention services with a specific interest in underrepresented populations.
    Jeiri and Elizabeth’s conversation explores the ways in which representation matters. Elizabeth explains the importance of bringing pieces of your identity as a person of color into the classroom and curriculum. She also takes us behind the scenes of her thesis, how she dug deep into the conversations surrounding disparities, and why she felt empowered as a Black mother with a learning disability to create an impact by simply being herself. 
    Elizabeth also speaks truth to power, of the dangers of terms and labels. She sparks the conversation of why a careless approach to language can be a huge disservice to people of color and people of color with disabilities.
    This is an important conversation that highlights the multifaceted nature of advocacy. Tune in as Elizabeth and Jeiri share the importance of highlighting Black and Brown voices, and why we should fight for systems that work for everyone.


    View all episodes and transcripts at http://www.aucd.org/podcast


    This episode was funded by the Administration for Community Living through technical assistance contract # HHSP233201600066C. The contents do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Administration on Community Living, US Department of Health and Human Services, or the US Government.

    • 25 min
    What is Cultural Brokerage and How it Engages Communities

    What is Cultural Brokerage and How it Engages Communities

    If you’re anything like Jeiri, you might not be familiar with the term “cultural broker”. That is why Jeiri is joined by Angela West. Angela is a multicultural specialist who serves families and professionals by educating them of the cultural impact on disability and connecting them to resources.
    Today, Angela is introducing you to what being a cultural broker is like. She talks about her experience being an individual with physical disabilities and the challenges she faces as she bridges the gap between cultural backgrounds and disabilities in communities. Angela also opens up about the impact she’s noticed on communities from her work such as seeing families gain access to resources which change their lives.
    From her favorite parts of being a cultural broker to the real-life impact that her work has, Angela, shares the important changes she’s set into motion, why she loves working with advocates, and her best advice for those looking at becoming or creating a cultural broker program at their UCEDD.

    View all episodes and transcripts at http://www.aucd.org/podcast

    This episode was funded by the Administration for Community Living through technical assistance contract # HHSP233201600066C. The contents do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Administration on Community Living, US Department of Health and Human Services, or the US Government.

    • 23 min
    Creating Space for Diversity, Inclusivity, and Community-Based Conversations

    Creating Space for Diversity, Inclusivity, and Community-Based Conversations

    George Gotto has experienced the network from many phases and positions. Today, he is the UCEDD Director of the University of Missouri Kansas City's Institute for Human Development in Kansas City, Missouri. He is trained as a medical anthropologist with an emphasis on community-based research and cross-cultural perspectives on health and discipline.
    For most of George’s career, he has experienced several positions within the network as he worked as both a trainee and an employee in Arizona, Kansas, and Missouri before taking his role as director. In today’s episode, Jeiri is chatting with George all about his experience growing within the network.
    Jeiri asks George about his top focus as a director from removing barriers from programs to increasing diversity within the network’s leadership. George shares the obstacles he faces in his pursuit of creating a more equitable process. He talks about the challenges that come with diversifying staff and how working closely with human resources made things easier.
    If you’re interested in growing within the network, this episode with George is for you. Tune in as George shares his story, what motivates him, how he fell in love with community-based research and the impact that comes from it, and his advice for youths who are working towards being more active.

    View all episodes and transcripts at http://www.aucd.org/podcast

    This episode was funded by the Administration for Community Living through technical assistance contract # HHSP233201600066C. The contents do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Administration on Community Living, US Department of Health and Human Services, or the US Government.

    • 19 min
    Growing Leaders in Self-Advocacy

    Growing Leaders in Self-Advocacy

    When it comes to creating a  self-advocacy curriculum, teamwork really does make the dream work. It takes a deep and patient understanding of the history and culture of the many walks of life. Jairo Arana joins the AUCD Network Narratives podcast today to share his advice on how we can improve self-advocacy curriculums within our programs.
    Jairo’s journey in self-advocacy began after being diagnosed late in life with autism and taking a three-day intensive pipeline leadership training program. This sparked his self-advocacy journey which eventually led him to become the full-time clinical program coordinator at the Mailman Center for Child Development. 
    In this episode, Jairo shares his personal story of self-advocacy, leadership, and impact. He opens up about his creative passion for telling stories and the arts. He talks about the importance of seeing diversity and inclusion in his favorite shows and how this has impacted the stories he wants to tell. Jairo takes you behind the scenes of his leadership program and how finding his mentor impacted his work and self-advocacy journey. 
    Listen to Jairo’s story as he shares important stories about self-advocacy, his journey through his late diagnosis, what he would tell his younger self today, and why learning the history, understanding the culture, and teamwork is the way to a more empathetic and inclusive future.
    View all episodes and transcripts at http://www.aucd.org/podcast


    This episode was funded partially by the Administration for Community Living through technical assistance contract # HHSP233201600066C. The contents do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Administration on Community Living, US Department of Health and Human Services, or the US Government.

    This podcast episode is provided in partial fulfillment of tasks outlined in a cooperative agreement (#UA5MC11068) between AUCD and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB). The contents do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of MCHB, the Health Resources Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or the U.S. Government.

    • 14 min
    Inclusivity and the Legacy of Disability Advocacy in Indigenous Cultures

    Inclusivity and the Legacy of Disability Advocacy in Indigenous Cultures

    Did you know that there isn’t a word for “disability” across indigenous languages? Instead, there are different terminologies used amongst indigenous communities. If you’re wondering what inclusivity and advocacy for disabilities in Indigenous cultures look like, this episode is for you.
    Today, Jeiri sits down with Jim Warne, who is the Director of Community Engagement and Diversity at the University of South Dakota’s Center for Disabilities Oyate’ Circle. The Oyate’ Circle addresses indigenous disability issues for South Dakota’s tribal nations. He is also President of Warrior Society Development, LLC., a consultant with the University of Arizona, and an Emmy nominated filmmaker.
    In their conversation, Jim shares his motivation and his why behind the Oyate’ Circle and the work that they do. He also talks about the early stages of setting parameters of ADA and the growing pains that came with it. Jim shares what disability and disability advocacy looks like within indigenous communities, and how he has found the strength to pave the way for future generations to come. Tune in as Jim and Jeiri share personal stories about their advocacy,  families, and the legacy they hope to leave behind.

    View all episodes and transcripts at http://www.aucd.org/podcast

    This episode was funded by the Administration for Community Living through technical assistance contract # HHSP233201600066C. The contents do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Administration on Community Living, US Department of Health and Human Services, or the US Government.

    • 26 min

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