67 episodes

Hear the epic true tales of how developers, programmers, hackers, geeks, and open source rebels are revolutionizing the technology landscape. Command Line Heroes is an award-winning podcast hosted by Saron Yitbarek and produced by Red Hat. Get root access to show notes, transcripts, and other associated content at https://redhat.com/commandlineheroes

Command Line Heroes Red Hat

    • Technology
    • 4.6 • 404 Ratings

Hear the epic true tales of how developers, programmers, hackers, geeks, and open source rebels are revolutionizing the technology landscape. Command Line Heroes is an award-winning podcast hosted by Saron Yitbarek and produced by Red Hat. Get root access to show notes, transcripts, and other associated content at https://redhat.com/commandlineheroes

    Robot as Threat

    Robot as Threat

    When a robot goes bad, who is responsible? It’s not always clear if the user or the manufacturer is liable when a robot leaves the lot. Human behavior can be complex—and often contradictory. Asking machines to interpret that behavior is quite the task. Will it one day be possible for a robot to have its own sense of right and wrong? And barring robots acting of their own accord, whose job is it to make sure their actions can’t be hijacked?

    AJung Moon explains the ethical ramifications of robot AI. Ryan Gariepy talks about the levels of responsibility in robotic manufacturing. Stefanie Tellex highlights security vulnerabilities (and scares us, just a little). Brian Gerkey of Open Robotics discusses reaching the high bar of safety needed to deploy robots. And Brian Christian explores the multi-disciplinary ways humans can impart behavior norms to robots.

    • 23 min
    Humans as Robot Caretakers

    Humans as Robot Caretakers

    HitchBOT was an experiment in stewardship: A small, rudimentary robot unable to move on its own, depending on the kindness of passersby to help it along its journey. Until it met an untimely end. Trust is a two-way street, and because robots are not powered by their own moral code, they rely on humans to supply both empathy and support.

    Dr. Frauke Zeller shares HitchBOT’s origin story. Eli Schwartz recounts his heartbreak upon learning what happened in Philadelphia. Dr. Julie Carpenter analyzes why it all went down. And Georgia Guthrie epitomizes the outpouring of sympathy that followed. Together, they tell a layered story about humans, and how we respond to robots. With HitchBOT, we find a little hope in the shadow of its demise.

    • 21 min
    Robot as Body

    Robot as Body

    For years, prosthetic technology focused on form over function, on masking lost limbs, rather than agency and usability. But things are changing. Innovations in robotics are giving more people more options, with lower thresholds of entry—and lower price tags, too.

    Tilly Lockey takes us through her journey with prosthetic arms. Brian Schulz gives some history of mechanical prosthetics, and what it means for people to reach embodiment with their devices. Tyler Hayes talks about the software that made advancements in assistive technology possible. Charlie Kemp discusses his work building universal robot interfaces, and how they can benefit everyone. And Henry and Jane Evans explain how robots can help a person reach beyond their body’s limitations.

    • 22 min
    From Compiler: Do We Want A World Without Technical Debt?

    From Compiler: Do We Want A World Without Technical Debt?

    Who says tech talk has to be boring? On Compiler, we dig into tech topics big, small, and strange. We talk to people who know the code, and bring their perspectives back to you. Intrigued? Here's a preview episode.

    Software development teams often reach a crossroads. Should they perform maintenance and address bug issues, or add new features to satisfy users? The former isn’t as exciting, but sometimes the most important work is invisible to those who reap the benefits. For now, the project has been released, and everyone wants to celebrate. But there’s an elephant in the room, one that teams can ignore—at least, for a while. In this episode of Compiler, we unpack the concept of technical debt, and wonder if there is a world where it doesn’t exist.

    • 21 min
    Robot as Humanoid

    Robot as Humanoid

    It’s hard enough to make a functional, reliable robot. Many people also want to make those robots in our image. That’s a tough needle to thread. Often, the most efficient design isn’t the most human-like one. But that isn’t stopping us from reaching for those humanoid robots.

    Professor Shigeki Sugano argues in favor of creating human-shaped robots. But it’s such an enduring challenge, we’ve come up with a name for it: the uncanny valley. Evan Ackerman walks us through the uncanny valley’s treacherous terrain. Deanna Dezern shares how she’s connected to her robot companion. And Dor Skuler explains how he deliberately avoided making his robots look like humans.

    • 22 min
    Robot as Maker

    Robot as Maker

    One of the first functional robots appeared on TV in 1966. That’s earlier than some of us expect. The Unimate’s televised premiere sparked the world’s imagination. It represented a host of possibilities. Those possibilities, however, also implied a coming competition that would last for decades.

    Dag Spicer tells the story of the Unimate, the first industrial robot—and how little the American public trusted it. But that distrust wasn’t universal. Tomonori Sanada explains how the Unimate was received very differently in Japan. Joe Campbell describes the dangers of working alongside industrial robots. But he’s working to change that with cobots. And Paul Shoup shares how his company, employees, and customers are benefiting from cobots.

    • 24 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
404 Ratings

404 Ratings

Bennyman008 ,

One of my favs

Love this podcast! Make more content like this!

UX_dave ,

Great content, annoying host

I so want to listen to every podcast from this show. But the host’s vocal delivery is so exaggerated and affected that it’s unlistenable. This is too bad, because when the host interviews people in a normal conversation, she shows that she does have a more normal way of talking in real life. Unfortunately the scripted parts of the show are delivered in an over-the-top sing-song manner.

Jesusara ,

So good

I just found out about this podcast. I really enjoining, good thing it has 7 seasons so far. Congratulations!!!

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