22 episodes

Reed Smith transactional lawyers delve into the latest themes affecting the corporate world and provide perspectives into the legal and commercial considerations impacting how transactions get done. Their insights will help you navigate the complexities of deal-making across industries around the globe.

Dealmaker Insights Reed Smith

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 9 Ratings

Reed Smith transactional lawyers delve into the latest themes affecting the corporate world and provide perspectives into the legal and commercial considerations impacting how transactions get done. Their insights will help you navigate the complexities of deal-making across industries around the globe.

    Private Equity Spotlight: The current state of the health care private equity market

    Private Equity Spotlight: The current state of the health care private equity market

    This episode features a panel discussion on the current state of the health care private equity market, comparing it to previous years and exploring how the industry has adapted, and continues to adapt, to remain competitive.
    The panel was moderated by Chris Sheaffer, global vice-chair of Private Equity at Reed Smith, and Nicole Aiken-Shaban, Life Sciences & Health Care partner at Reed Smith. Panelists included Tony Crisman, managing director and head of Healthcare IB at Stout; Daniel Schultz, managing director of BD at Webster Equity; Kevin Reilly, managing director at Ally Bridge; Brandon Cohen, principal at H.I.G. Capital; and Brian Bewley, Life Sciences & Health Care partner at Reed Smith.
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    Transcript:
    Intro: Hello, welcome to Dealmaker Insights, a podcast brought to you by Reed Smith's corporate and finance lawyers from around the globe. In this podcast series, we explore the various legal and financial issues impacting your deals. Should you have any questions on any of the content through this series, please contact our speakers. 
    Chris: Welcome to the panel. Appreciate you guys taking part in this kind of state of the healthcare healthcare market panel as part of our private equity healthcare forum being hosted in the New York office today. We've got a great panel together. Maybe before we start, we'll kind of kick things off with introductions. My name is Chris Sheaffer. I'm vice chair of Reed Smith's private equity group. 
    Nicole: Nicole Aiken-Shaban. I'm a partner in Reed Smith's Philadelphia office with a focus in healthcare regulatory and transactional work, and particularly in the private equity space. 
    Tony: Tony Crisman, Managing Director, Head of Healthcare Investment Banking at Stout, 25-year healthcare investment banker. I was at Lincoln for 15 years before that and started out at an old name firm, Dain Rauscher Wessels. 
    Brandon: Brandon Cohen, I'm a principal at HIG Capital based out of Miami. I spend all my time in healthcare. 
    Daniel: My name is Dan Schultz. I'm a Managing Director at Webster and I manage all of our business development. 
    Kevin: And I'm Kevin Riley. I'm Managing Director at Ally Bridge Group. We're a life sciences-focused healthcare investor, predominantly in biotech and medtech, mainly focused on growth stage transactions. 
    Brian: Good afternoon. My name is Brian Bewley. I'm in our life sciences and health industry group like Nicole and heavily focused on private equity transactions. 
    Chris: So let's just dig into it. I mean, private equity investing in healthcare has been a very hot topic over the last couple of years. You know, the market generally between interest rates, you know, macro events, obviously an upcoming election. There's been a lot of focus on the regulatory side recently. Look, Tony, you're sitting closest to me. I mean, look, on the investment banking side, you guys obviously see quite a lot. I mean, how has 2023 been? How's the first ’24 been? How's the first half of the year? 
    Tony: It's been an interesting start to the year. I think that there was a lot of pent up demand, an interesting thing that I always think about. The beginning of my career, capital was the scarcity and assets were the commodity, and we're completely upside down. And we were trending that way over the last 20, 25 years. But I think a lot of people were really hoping for a tidal wave of transaction activity to start ’23, or start ’24. And I think for the most part, what we've seen coming to market are a lot of assets that bankers and private equity have been kind of holding on to maybe late ’22, ’23 might have been their initial timing. But just looking at the overall market dynamics and things of that nature, they were kind of held. So it really started to perk up in late March. And I do think that the regulatory dynamics, they always drive deal activity within healthcare, which is why it's technically attractive. And so you do see a lot of portfolio adjustment

    • 31 min
    FTC Non-Compete Ban: What you need to know

    FTC Non-Compete Ban: What you need to know

    Reed Smith partners Mark Goldstein, Cindy Minniti, and Michelle Mantine come together to break down the Federal Trade Commission's final rule on non-compete agreements and how it may affect U.S. businesses.
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    Transcript:
    Intro: Hello, and welcome to Dealmaker Insights, a podcast brought to you by Reed Smith's corporate and finance lawyers from around the globe. In this podcast series, we explore the various legal and financial issues impacting your deals. Should you have any questions on any of the content, please contact our speakers. 
    Mark: Welcome back, everyone, to Dealmaker Insights. My name is Mark Goldstein. I'm a partner in Reed Smith and Labor and Employment Group, and I'm joined by my colleagues, Cindy Minniti and Michelle Mantine, both partners as well at the firm. Today's topic is non-compete agreements. Been all over the news lately. Non-compete agreements have long been used by businesses to bar key employees from leaving their business and going and setting up shop across the street the next day. There are a whole host of reasons why businesses may want to impose a non-compete agreement on an employee. However, over the past several years, state legislators have worked increasingly scrutinized the use of non-compete agreements that passed a whole host of legislation. And finally, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission in April 2024 issued a final rule that if it takes effect, would prohibit virtually all pre-existing and future non-compete agreements across the U.S. So I'd like to turn it over to my colleagues today, Cindy and Michelle, and together we'll break down what the Federal Trade Commission's final rule says and how it may impact U.S. businesses. So, Cindy, let me start with you. Can you tell us a little bit about the background to the rule? 
    Cindy: Sure. Thanks, Mark. Like you said, there have been a lot of state legislation recently over the last couple of years, really trying to limit the use of non-compete agreements. And President Biden in July of 2021 directed the Federal Trade Commission to come up with some federal legislation really limiting the use of non-compete agreements. In an effort to really be wide sweeping in January of 2023, the FTC put out a proposed rule, which got a lot of attention from businesses and a lot of people commented on the proposed rule during the comment period. There were about 26,000 comments to the proposed legislation. And then ultimately, the proposed rule is now out as of May of this year, it was published in the Federal Register. And like you said, if it does go into It will go into effect in September. But it really is an absolute ban to non-compete agreements. There are very, very limited exceptions, but this is really an absolute ban on current and future non-compete agreements for virtually everyone. There's a small exclusion for senior executives and some other minor exclusions, but really this is an effort to really stop people from really enforcing non-competes on their workforce, really open up people and to be able to go to competitors. It's also interesting that it's not just for employees. The proposed rule is for anyone that's really doing work. So So employees, contractors, anybody that's got any kind of a relationship. So independent contractors, interns, it's really very broad sweeping. 
    Mark: That's a great point, Cindy. And the definitions within the final rule are really key and are extremely broad. The definition of worker, as you said, the definition of non-compete clause is quite broad. Michelle, let me ask you, because I know that this is a question a lot of our clients have asked. We understand that future non-compete agreements after the rule takes effect, if it takes effect in September as the currently scheduled effective date, those would not be above board. But what about pre-existing non-compete agreements? I know Cindy alluded to it, but how does the final rule adjust pre-existing non-competes? 
    Michelle: No, it's

    • 25 min
    Private Equity Spotlight: A Conversation with Matt Carlos of New Water Capital

    Private Equity Spotlight: A Conversation with Matt Carlos of New Water Capital

    In our latest episode of our Private Equity Spotlight series, Reed Smith partner Nick Gibson is joined by Matthew Carlos, a principal at New Water Capital, for a deep dive into the unique aspects of Lower Middle Market Private Equity.
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    Transcript: 
    Intro: Hello, and welcome to Dealmaker Insights, a podcast brought to you by Reed Smith's corporate and finance lawyers from around the globe. In this podcast series, we explore the various legal and financial issues impacting your deals. Should you have any questions on any of the content, please contact our speakers.
    Nick: Welcome back to Dealmaker Insights, the Reed Smith podcast series spotlighting the private equity industry. I'm Nick Gibson, a private equity M&A partner in the Chicago office of Reed Smith, and I'm excited to welcome Matt Carlos of New Water Capital as our guest today. I've really enjoyed getting to know Matt and his team who have focused and thrived in the lower middle market. Matt wears a lot of hats at New Water Capital, and that's one of the topics we'll dig into a bit today. But first, I'll turn it over to Matt and let him introduce himself and New Water Capital. Great to have you here, Matt.
    Matt: Thanks, Nick. Appreciate you having me and happy to chat through the latest and greatest of New Water here. So I can dive right into a quick background on myself and on New Water. So I'm a principal here at New Water Capital. Been with the guys now for over seven years. Joined back in January of 2017. The fund officially started in 2016 and was originally a spin out of Sun Capital Partners. So Jason and Brian spent around a decade together at Sun. Saw Sun grow from a few hundred million under management, multiples of billions. I'm sure as as you know. And the rationale or the reason to spin out and do their own thing, create New Water, was to refocus on the lower middle market. And we've incrementally refined that for us to be really focused on what we call blue-collar industries. So manufacturing, industrial services, packaging, distribution. That really covers the majority of what we're focused on. From an end market perspective, we're a bit more agnostic. So if you look at in our portfolio. It's food and beverage, it's industrial technology, auto, packaging, you name it. And so we do tend to be more operationally focused and much more opportunistic. So we've got an in-house ops team, ex-CEO, CFO, COO type folks who work exclusively for New Water, so not consultants on hired guns. And so they are invaluable in dropping into our portfolio companies and help them think through next steps. So there's just creating KPIs, budgeting, walking the shop floor, look at efficiencies, and or just being a shoulder to cry on, quite frankly, as we go through growing pains or integration. And so really a valuable part of the team, but it helps kind of differentiate what New Water does in the market, which is really focused on where we can help portcos grow, improve, and. Get to the next level.
    Nick: That's great. Can you talk about the various hats that you wear in your role particularly, and maybe how that differs in approach from other private equity firms?
    Matt: Sure. Yeah, we are a lean team. And so because of that, like you mentioned earlier, we do wear a lot of hats. First and foremost, I think other private equity funds that are our size and focus in our industries, I think it's very typical for those firms or a lot of our brethren these days to have a designated business development arm. We at New Water do not at the moment. I think at some point in the future, hopefully we will be large enough to where it's needed. But at the moment, we don't. And so what that means is that myself and the other folks on the deal team here, we will kind of pass the hat or pull straws to just do the best we can to attend as many events and conferences, to be doing city visits visits, and meeting with intermediaries and bankers and lenders as much as we c

    • 21 min
    Private Equity Spotlight: New state notices and consent requirements in healthcare transactions

    Private Equity Spotlight: New state notices and consent requirements in healthcare transactions

    In this episode of our Private Equity Spotlight series, life sciences and healthcare partners Carol Loepere and Nicole Aiken-Shaban discuss the new state laws requiring notices and consent from state regulatory authorities prior to completing healthcare transactions.
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    Transcript: 
    Intro: Hello and welcome to Dealmaker Insights, a podcast brought to you by Reed Smith's corporate and finance lawyers from around the globe. In this podcast series, we explore the various legal and financial issues impacting your deals. Should you have any questions on any of the content please contact our speakers.
    Carol: Welcome back to Dealmaker Insights. I'm Carol Loepere, a partner in Reed Smith's Healthcare and Life Sciences Group and I'm joined today with my partner Nicole Aiken-Shaban. We both help companies navigate regulatory considerations for deals in the health care space. Today, we're discussing recent enactment of state laws requiring notice and in some cases approval from state regulatory authorities prior to completing a health care transaction. These are notable as they are separate from long-standing laws regarding changes of ownership or CHOWS as they're often referred to at the state level, governing state licensure and certificate of need. And also they're different from federal laws governing health care transactions such as Hart- Scott-Redo and Medicare, Nicole. Why are we seeing these laws? What are they designed to achieve?
    Nicole: That's a great question, Carol. There are a number of different motivations and some states are focused on local concerns as a group. However, these laws broadly are meant to address a perceived gap in oversight for the majority of health care providers within a state that have not historically been subject to more intense certificate of need and or licensure processes. Uh think about hospitals and other hospices or entities like that. In that latter bucket, one question I have asked myself is why now as our listeners likely know, health care is a priority at the federal level right now with increased scrutiny on antitrust and anti competitive enforcement efforts, there's also a related effort to target private equity investment specifically in health care, both by federal agencies, Congress and also the press. Not surprisingly, that focus has trickled down to state legislative action when you take that focus and combine it with the proliferation of nontraditional providers that occurred during the pandemic. Just a couple of years ago, a number of states have started to look to exert more oversight over the provision of health care and who's providing it in their borders. Carol, what is a snapshot of the current landscape of these laws?
    Carol: As of April 2024 there are 14 states with health care transaction notice and or approval requirements. Some of these have been on the books a long time while others are brand new and some are just taking effect later this year. One of them is Indiana and we'll talk a little bit about that later. Importantly, though there is legislation pending in several other states including California, for example. So it's very important to check state law as well as pending legislation and regulations that are implementing these laws as you consider health care transactions in various states. Before we discuss a couple of examples of these laws, Nicole, are there certain characteristics or themes that people should keep in mind in reviewing these laws?
    Nicole: Yes, I know we are both a fan of lists and for our listeners, I've put together three key points to keep in mind when assessing these laws. First, they are very fact dependent. Many laws have threshold limits that define material transactions or the types of transactions and affiliations subject to the laws. They have varied effective dates, sometimes different effective dates within the same state based on the type of transaction. And there is specific language in those laws on their a

    • 19 min
    U.S. antitrust developments: FTC Section 5 and beyond (Part 3)

    U.S. antitrust developments: FTC Section 5 and beyond (Part 3)

    With the recent explosion of antitrust developments in the United States, members of our Corporate and Antitrust & Competition teams have come together to produce a three-part series that discusses the practical impact of these developments for our clients. In this third and final episode, Reed Smith partners Anatoliy Rozental and Ed Schwartz team up to talk about merger planning during these times of uncertainty.
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    Transcript:
    Intro: Hello and welcome to Dealmaker Insights, a podcast brought to you by Reed Smith's corporate and finance lawyers from around the globe. In this podcast series, we explore the various legal and financial issues impacting your deals. Should you have any questions on any of the content please contact our speakers.
    Anatoliy: Hi, everyone and welcome back to Reed Smith's podcast series, Dealmaker Insights. I'm Anatoliy Rozental, Private Equity M&A partner based in our New York office. With the explosion of developments in the U.S. antitrust space. I’ve teamed up with our antitrust and competition team to chair a three part series where we will be discussing the practical impact of recent developments and key priorities for our clients. Our third and final episode, I'm honored to be joined by my partner Ed Schwartz, who was a member of the global antitrust competition team and who is at the forefront of some of these antitrust battles. Ed, thank you so much for joining me today.
    Ed: It's a pleasure to be with you today. Anatoliy.
    Anatoliy: Thank you, Ed. So let's dive right in. We've all heard and read so much about the changes in antitrust enforcement under President Biden, especially when it comes to mergers. We've also heard that these changes have made it more difficult to get deals through both the DOJ and the FTC. So do merging parties really need to approach the merger enforcement process differently today than they did even four years ago?
    Ed: I think they do Anatoliy. Look, we all know that President Biden came into office with a mandate which I think can more accurately be described as a dictate from the progressive wing of the Democratic party to bolster antitrust enforcement, especially with regard to mergers and beginning with the appointment of Lina Khan to chair the FTC and the appointment of Jonathan Kanter at the antitrust division. We've seen the White House act on that mandate. And each of them Khan and Kanter has implemented changes at their respective agencies that have made getting many deals through the agencies more challenging. Now, the good news is that we have not seen a dramatic increase in the number of cases being investigated through a second request or being challenged in court. And that was expected by many of us. We've seen fewer in fact, particularly at the FTC. And there are a lot of reasons for that, that I don't really have time to get into, but still for parties who are trying to navigate the merger enforcement process deals that potentially raise anti-competitive concerns. And I'm talking about deals where there is a significant horizontal overlap between the parties or maybe because it's a vertical transaction which could be seen as potentially threatening to rivals of either the buyer or the seller. These parties do need to adjust their strategies for dealing with the antitrust agencies to adapt to the changes that we've seen.
    Anatoliy: So, what do you think are the biggest changes in merger enforcement that you've witnessed that are impacting parties today? They're trying to navigate the merger enforcement process?
    Ed: Well, it's a lot, but maybe I can speak first in broad strokes. Uh I think the changes made by the agencies fall into three broad categories. First, the agencies have broadened the scope of deals that the agencies consider to be potentially anti-competitive. Second, they've implemented changes that couldn't make getting a deal through more difficult and take longer if the agency decides to investigate. And three, th

    • 17 min
    U.S. antitrust developments: Spotlight on new merger guidelines (Part 2)

    U.S. antitrust developments: Spotlight on new merger guidelines (Part 2)

    With the recent explosion of antitrust developments in the United States, members of our Corporate and Antitrust & Competition teams have come together to produce a three-part series that discusses the practical impact of these developments for our clients. In this episode, Reed Smith partners Anatoliy Rozental and Chris Brennan discuss new U.S. merger guidelines.
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    Transcript:
    Intro: Hello, welcome to Dealmaker Insights, a podcast brought to you by Reed Smith's corporate and finance lawyers from around the globe. In this podcast series, we explore the various legal and financial issues impacting your deals. Should you have any questions on any of the content through this series, please contact our speakers. 
    Anatoliy: Hi, everyone and welcome back to Reed Smith's podcast series, Dealmaker Insights. I'm Anatoliy Rosental, private equity and M&A partner based in our New York office with the explosion of developments in the US antitrust space. I've teamed up with some of our antitrust and competition team to chair a three-part series where we'll be discussing the practical impact of recent developments and key priorities for some of our clients. For our second episode, I'm joined by Chris Brennan, who is a partner in Reed Smith's global antitrust  and competition team and whose practice is at the forefront of these antitrust battles. Chris, thank you so much for joining me today. 
    Chris: Thanks, Anatoliy. Always good to work with you and especially for today's discussion which focuses on a major development on how our clients evaluate and plan for merger clearance issues in the US. 
    Anatoliy: So let's, let's jump right in. You know, this episode is focused on the US Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission's 2023 merger guidelines. So to start at the beginning for our listeners who may not be familiar with the history, you know, I understand that the first guidelines were issued way back in 1968 and there have been several iterations since then. The 2023 guidelines consolidate, revise, replace the various versions of the merger guidelines issued by the FTC and DOJ. And can you give us a brief background of what these guidelines represent? 
    Chris: So, the stated purpose of these guidelines is to help the public business leaders, practitioners that would be you and I and courts understand how the agencies consider certain issues when investigating mergers. The ideas is that they reflect the agency's current approach to merger enforcement and provide you and me and the larger community insights into how those mergers are going to be analyzed at least for the current agency leadership. And just so we're all on the same page. US law requires companies to file a notification that's known as an HSR filing to the FTC and DOJ for a proposed merger that at least for this year in 2024 is valued at or above 119.5 million. Once that filing is submitted, the agencies have 30 days to decide if they want to further investigate and potentially challenge the merger and critically the parties cannot close the deal while that process is playing out. So while these guidelines are non binding, you should think of them as the playbook for DOJ and FTC personnel that review those filings and that playbook is how agency leadership expects them to analyze a merger during the 30 day review period, and whether to let that deal close or to pump the brakes and investigate further. 
    Anatoliy: Got it. So are the 2023 guidelines, another incremental change or is this something more groundbreaking? 
    Chris: So it's definitely groundbreaking, but potentially not in the normal sense of that phrase. The agencies have touted these guidelines as necessary to address quote unquote the modern economy. Yet many of the legal authorities that the agencies rely on for significant changes in these guidelines are based on pre 1980’s case law and many of those authorities have been ignored or rejected by courts over the last 40 years

    • 18 min

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