40 episodes

A look back in history at a time of great promise and great disappointment for Black Americans who dreamed of and struggled for the promise of community and full citizenship.

Dreams of Black Wall Street Nia Clark

    • History
    • 4.5 • 310 Ratings

A look back in history at a time of great promise and great disappointment for Black Americans who dreamed of and struggled for the promise of community and full citizenship.

    S3 E5 Durham's Black Wall Street Part 1

    S3 E5 Durham's Black Wall Street Part 1

    The beginning of an exploration into the community of Durham, North Carolina in the period following the 1898 white supremacist campaign that led to the Wilmington Insurrection and Coup D’Etat that same year. The tobacco boom in Durham in the late 1800’s helped establish the city as a center of enterprise in North Carolina. Durham’s burgeoning population in the late 19th century accelerated the city’s economic growth further still, which continued to be fueled in large part by the tobacco and textile industries. Over the next several decades the city continued to draw migrants, including Whites and Blacks, in search of steady employment and business opportunities. 

    Just as a small group of White entrepreneurs capitalized the proliferation of enterprise in Durham and became very successful, so did a group of African American entrepreneurs and professionals, who, over time, became patriarchs of Black Durham and de facto spokesmen for Black people in the absence of Black political participation or representation for African Americans in North Carolina. The men were responsible for the founding and success of a number of enterprises, including North Carolina Mutual and Provident Association, which later became North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company: the first black-owned insurance company in the state and the largest in the nation, The street it was located on in Durham--Parrish St.-- became known as Black Wall Street. At its height, Black Durham was considered the “Capital of the Black middle class” in America: a reputation that earned acclaim from some of the day’s most prominent leaders, including Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Dubois. 

    Guests in this episode include Duke University Professor Emeritus of Public Policy, Robert Korstad, as well as North Carolina Central University business, Professor Henry McKoy.



    Musical Attribution:


    1. Title: African Moon by John Bartmann. License, disclaimer and copyright information: CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/

    Link to Music: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/John_Bartmann/Public_Domain_Soundtrack_Music_Album_One/african-moon



    2. Title: Window Sparrows by Axletree. Licensed under a Attribution License. License, disclaimer and copyright information: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

    Link to music: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Axletree/Ornamental_EP/Window_Sparrows

    Several musical selections are also provided by the American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress.

    • 52 min
    S3 E4 The White Supremacist Campaign of 1900: How Black Men Lost the Vote

    S3 E4 The White Supremacist Campaign of 1900: How Black Men Lost the Vote

    Almost immediately following the white supremacist campaign that culminated in the 1898 Wilmington Insurrection and Coup D’Etat came the 1900 white supremacist campaign that culminated in the “Suffrage Amendment” to the North Carolina constitution, which helped engineer the near complete elimination of Blacks from voter participation in North Carolina until the voting rights act of 1965. This campaign would change the course of North Carolina’s social and political trajectory - and result in seemingly immutable ramifications for African Americans in North Carolina for decades to come: the effects of which the United State’s continues to see in the present day.  A number of experts have asserted that the 1898 white supremacist campaign was a blueprint, not only for the 1900 white supremacist campaign in North Carolina, but also for similar acts of oppression and violence across the Jim Crow South. Guests in this episode include David Zucchino - New York Times Journalist and author of Wilmington's Lie: The Murderous Coup of 1898 and the Rise of White Supremacy. Listeners will also hear from attorney Richard Paschal, who is also the author of Jim Crow in North Carolina: The Legislative Program from 1865 to 1920.
    Musical Attribution:
    1. Title: African Moon by John Bartmann. License, disclaimer and copyright information: CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/
    Link to Music: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/John_Bartmann/Public_Domain_Soundtrack_Music_Album_One/african-moon
    2. Title: Window Sparrows by Axletree. Licensed under a Attribution License. License, disclaimer and copyright information: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
    Link to music: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Axletree/Ornamental_EP/Window_Sparrows

    • 59 min
    S3 E3 The 1898 Wilmington Insurrection and Coup D'Etat Part 2

    S3 E3 The 1898 Wilmington Insurrection and Coup D'Etat Part 2

    The continuation of a deep dive into the 1898 Wilmington Insurrection and Coup D'Etat. The massacre was part of a larger white supremacy campaign organized by Democratic leaders in North Carolina. It resulted in the deaths of potentially hundreds of African Americans who lived in Wilmington's Black community, which is were its thriving Black middle class resided. Property owned by African Americans was destroyed. The city's duly elected multi-racial local government - made up of Blacks and whites - was ousted from office and white supremacists were installed through methods of violence, coercion and fraud. In a period of months, Wilmington went from being North Carolina's largest city that was made up of a majority of African American residents to a majority white city that would see its Black population continue to dwindle and lose much of the wealth it had previously amassed in the coming years. Listeners will hear from descendants of Alexander Manly (a target of the Massacre and the editor of the only Black daily newspaper at the time), including Kieran Haile as well as Leila Haile. Listeners will also hear from North Carolina Central University Law Professor Irving Joyner.

    Musical Attribution:

    1. Title: African Moon by John Bartmann. License, disclaimer and copyright information: CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ Link to Music: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/John_Bartmann/Public_Domain_Soundtrack_Music_Album_One/african-moon

    2. Title: Window Sparrows by Axletree. Licensed under a Attribution License. License, disclaimer and copyright information: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)  Link to music: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Axletree/Ornamental_EP/Window_Sparrows

    • 43 min
    S3 Commemorative Special: 123 Years after the 1898 Wilmington Insurrection and Coup D'Etat

    S3 Commemorative Special: 123 Years after the 1898 Wilmington Insurrection and Coup D'Etat

    A special episode commemorating the 123rd anniversary of the 1898 Wilmington Insurrection and Coup D'Etat with highlights from commemorative events in Wilmington, North Carolina. Listeners will hear from a number of local and elected leaders in Wilmington as well as a member of the "Wilmington 10," Dr. Benjamin Chavis. Chavis returned to the city as a key note speaker at a special ceremony to commemorate the Wilmington Massacre decades after he was wrongfully convicted of conspiracy and arson along with nine other civil rights activists.

    • 1 hr 11 min
    S3 E2 The 1898 Wilmington Insurrection and Coup D'Etat Part 1

    S3 E2 The 1898 Wilmington Insurrection and Coup D'Etat Part 1

    The beginning of a deep dive into the 1898 Wilmington Insurrection and Coup D'Etat. The massacre was part of a larger white supremacy campaign organized by Democratic leaders in North Carolina. It resulted in the deaths of potentially hundreds of African Americans who lived in Wilmington's Black community, which is where its thriving Black middle class resided. Property owned by African Americans was destroyed. The city's duly elected multi-racial local government - made up of Blacks and whites - was ousted from office and white supremacists were installed through methods of violence, coercion and fraud. In a period of months, Wilmington went from being North Carolina's largest city that was made up of a majority of African American residents to a majority white city that would see its Black population continue to dwindle and lose much of the wealth it had previously amassed in the coming years. Listeners will hear from Pulitzer Prize-winner, contributing writer for the New York Times and author of Wilmington's Lie: The Murderous Coup of 1898 and the Rise of White Supremacy, David Zucchino.



    Musical Attribution:   

    1. Title: African Moon by John Bartmann. License, disclaimer and copyright information: CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ Link to Music: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/John_Bartmann/Public_Domain_Soundtrack_Music_Album_One/african-moon   



    2. Title: Window Sparrows by Axletree. Licensed under a Attribution License. License, disclaimer and copyright information: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)  Link to music: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Axletree/Ornamental_EP/Window_Sparrows 

    • 39 min
    SE03 EP1: Wilmington, North Carolina Before the Insurrection of 1898

    SE03 EP1: Wilmington, North Carolina Before the Insurrection of 1898

    Journalist, podcast host and producer, Nia Clark, revisits often overlooked but important parts of North Carolina's history that have played a significant part in shaping some of the state's most influential African American communities such as Wilmington, Raleigh, James City, Princeville and Durham. Clark also begins a deep dive exploration of the city of Wilmington before the 1898 Wilmington Insurrection and Coup d'Etat. Guests on this episode include attorney, legal scholar and author of Jim Crow in North Carolina: The Legislative Program from 1865 to 1920, Richard Paschal, as well as North Carolina Central State University Law Professor Irving Joyner.

    Musical Attribution:


    1. Title: African Moon by John Bartmann. License, disclaimer and copyright information: CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/

    Link to Music: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/John_Bartmann/Public_Domain_Soundtrack_Music_Album_One/african-moon



    2. Title: Window Sparrows by Axletree. Licensed under a Attribution License. License, disclaimer and copyright information: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)

    Link to music: https://freemusicarchive.org/music/Axletree/Ornamental_EP/Window_Sparrows

    Several musical selections are also provided by the American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress.

    • 50 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
310 Ratings

310 Ratings

callmedoge ,

Just keeps getting better

This show gets better with every season. I am really enjoying the direction that Nia Clark is taking season 3 beyond the Tulsa Oklahoma Massacre, and on to exposing and exploring racial violence that has existed throughout our country’s history, but is never taught in public institutions.

Forgotton King ,

Remarkable Education while being entertained

Nia Clarke has created a masterful work of art that has invaluable content from scholars and first had witnesses. Can not say enough about this work of art! Excited that Season 3 is here and even more excited that I recommended she do a Season on Wilmington and she ended up following suit coincidently or directly. If you are debating on giving this a listen do yourself a favor and dive in.. But be ready for the ride! The amount of first l hand and second hand accounts are fascinating as well as extremely moving. So happy to have stumbled upon this remarkable piece of education during the pandemic. I will be a fan for life!

ginseng.n.juice ,

Wonderful journalism, deep and measured coverage

One of the best podcasts I’ve heard in a looooong time. Early in season 1 the podcast added rich perspective to some stories and timelines that I’d been struggling with for a long time. The podcast offered an amazing addition to my understanding of American history, even though the focus is on Oklahoma - that is masterful storytelling, in my opinion.

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