295 episodes

Earth to Humans is a bi-weekly interview series featuring conversations with some of the amazing humans who are fighting for a brighter and more just future for all of Earth's inhabitants.
https://earthtohumanspod.com
Join private conversations with top authors and access exclusive bonus content!
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


earthtohumanspodcast.substack.com

Earth to Humans Earth to Humans Podcast

    • Science
    • 4.9 • 68 Ratings

Earth to Humans is a bi-weekly interview series featuring conversations with some of the amazing humans who are fighting for a brighter and more just future for all of Earth's inhabitants.
https://earthtohumanspod.com
Join private conversations with top authors and access exclusive bonus content!
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.


earthtohumanspodcast.substack.com

    Virus Vibes (Part 1) w/ Dr. Wendy Puryear

    Virus Vibes (Part 1) w/ Dr. Wendy Puryear

    Today we embark on the first of a two-part deep dive into a topic that's as fascinating as it is unsettling: avian influenza.
    Joining us is Dr. Wendy Puryear, a leading virologist who’s pioneering work on the H5N1 strain of avian influenza has revealed some startling truths about how this virus spreads and the profound impacts it has on wildlife, particularly marine mammals.

    In this episode, we'll explore the intricate dance of viruses as they leap from birds to mammals, mammals to mammals, and maybe even mammals to birds, uncovering the ecological and health implications of these cross-species transmissions. We'll hear from Dr. Puryear about the challenges and triumphs of tracking these invisible threats and the collaborative efforts needed to combat them.

    This is part one of our exploration into avian influenza.


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    • 1 hr
    The Joys and Fears of Women Who Wander

    The Joys and Fears of Women Who Wander

    On this episode, we’re re-airing an episode we really think you will love.
    Today, Sarinah tackles female solo hiking from the perspectives of 5 women as she tries to make sense of managing both the physical and mental fears of hiking alone, but also the beauty of mentorship and prioritizing joy in the outdoors. The women in this panel range from environmental scientists to travel bloggers, teachers to mothers, but all with individual expertise and an accomplished list of hikes that should intimidate the hell out of you.



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    • 1 hr 14 min
    Environmentalist group therapy with Dr Aura Goldman

    Environmentalist group therapy with Dr Aura Goldman

    Hannah is joined by Dr Aura Goldman - a psychotherapist who, amongst other accolades, specialises in eco-anxiety and the plethora of other climate and environmental emotions. They explore different case studies of environmentalists who are experiencing various environmental emotions, and Dr Goldman gives some fantastic tips on how to cope.


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    • 56 min
    Exploring the Spirit of Wildness with Laura Waterman

    Exploring the Spirit of Wildness with Laura Waterman

    I first came across the work of Laura Waterman while conducting research on the origins of the Appalachian Trail. As many of our listeners are surely aware by now, I completed a thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail in 2022, and am currently working on a 10-episode documentary radio series about the AT’s history and cultural influence in partnership with New Hampshire Public Radio. I was seeking information about the history of trail building in the Northeastern US, where the first modern long distance hiking trails were born, and I found everything that I was looking for in “Forest and Crag” by Laura and Guy Waterman.
    “Forest and Crag” is a comprehensive history of Mountain climbing in the Northeast - it is dense with information, but with a writing style that is accessible and compelling. Despite being first published over 35 years ago, it remains the best resource on this topic by a long shot. I was looking for someone to interview for my podcast series, so I also conducted research on the authors of this book - Laura and Guy Waterman. What I found was a story even more fascinating than the history of trail building laid out in “Forest and Crag”.
    I began reading Laura Waterman’s first memoir, “Losing the Garden”, and the story of Laura and Guy’s truly unique life together began to unfold in front of me. While the two of them were writing “Forest and Crag”, they were living in a rural Vermont homestead in a cabin they built themselves with no electricity or plumbing. They lived like they were in the 19th century for almost 30 years, until Guy’s depression intensified, and he decided to take his own life in the year 2000.
    But this wasn’t a typical suicide. Guy drew Laura into the planning of this effort to take his own life, and Laura, seeing no other option, went along with Guy’s plan. Guy ultimately chose to die by exposing himself to the elements on a winter hike of the Franconia Ridge - the site of the iconic New Hampshire ridge-line trail that Laura and Guy had maintained for almost 20 years.
    Laura published her first memoir “Losing the Garden” in 2005, but felt that she had left unanswered questions about her decision to go along with her husband’s plan to commit suicide. Her second memoir, published just a few months ago, “Calling Wild Places Home”, seeks to answer these questions, adding depth to the story of Laura’s truly unique life. Now 84 years old, Laura shares her reflections on the past, on aging, and the evolution of her writing style. It was truly and honor for me to have the opportunity to speak with Laura Waterman, and I hope that you enjoy the conversation as much as I did!
    -Matt Podolsky


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    • 1 hr 16 min
    Below the Edge of Darkness w/ Dr. Edith Widder

    Below the Edge of Darkness w/ Dr. Edith Widder

    Imagine descending into the abyss, leaving behind the sunlit waters and plunging into the dark, mysterious depths of the ocean. Here, sunlight fades away, and the pressure increases with every meter. This is the realm of the deep sea, an environment so extreme and alien that it's often compared to outer space.
    Under the weight of that much water and so far from the surface, you might envision the truest definition of darkness. But what if I told you there was an abundance of light just at the edge of darkness. Light that we are just beginning to understand.

    Dr. Edith Widder has dedicated her career to exploring these under-explored depths. She was one of the first scientists to capture the mesmerizing phenomenon of bioluminescence in its natural habitat. Bioluminescence is the emission of light by living organisms, a survival mechanism in the pitch-black ocean depths. It creates an otherworldly spectacle where creatures use light to communicate, hunt, and evade predators.

    From the hypnotic glow of jellyfish to the pulsing firework displays of deep-sea fish, bioluminescence transforms the dark ocean into a place of living light. Dr. Widder’s groundbreaking work not only showcases the beauty of these glowing organisms but also helps us understand the vital ecological roles they play.
    Join us as we journey with Dr. Edith Widder to uncover the secrets of the deep sea. Discover how these extraordinary light displays serve as both a beacon and a camouflage in the vast, dark expanse of the ocean. She shares her incredible experiences and insights into one of the most captivating phenomena of the natural world.

    Dr. Widder
    ORCA


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    • 1 hr 2 min
    Exploring eco-ableism with Umesh Balal Magar

    Exploring eco-ableism with Umesh Balal Magar

    In my echo chamber, gender, race, nationality, and gender are intersections that are spoken about and how they relate to environmentalism (still nowhere near frequently enough), yet one that was completely absent until recently was disability. I only truly became aware of this when I saw an article pop up featuring my guest on next week’s episode, who had gone to COP26 to ensure the voices of those living with disabilities were involved in climate discussions. Umesh Balal Magar is a young Nepalese disability and climate campaigner who, when he’s not working on improving climate related-water issues in Nepal, is fighting for more inclusive and equitable climate discussions and legislation.
    Artwork by Jasmine Hortop
    His story is so powerful and I wanted to use this platform to share it, to do something to amplify Umesh’s important messages and calls to action, as well as those of others working within this space.
    When I started researching this topic, I instantly became aware of a word that I hadn’t encountered before - eco-ableism. This is described by Friends of the Earth Scotland as, ‘‘a failure by non-disabled environmental activists to recognize that many of the climate actions they’re promoting make life difficult for disabled people’. They also listed examples, such as:
    - banning plastic straws without accepting that some disabled people need them to drink safely and conveniently
    - removing disabled parking bays to make way for cycle lanes
    - promoting active travel without realising that some disabled people cannot walk, wheel or cycle.
    These are very much local examples of eco-ableism within the UK and most probably many other countries too, but the reality is that it is very much a global issue.
    Something that Umesh raised during our episode, which horrified me, was that disabled people are currently completely left out of plans for disaster response, such as during evacuations. Umesh and his community are fighting for legislative change that will ensure that this does not continue, but progress is frustratingly slow and time is not on humanity’s side when it comes to climate change.
    Here’s a few resources that go into more detail about eco-ableism, as well as a written interview with Umesh.
    Friends of the Earth Scotland - Eco Ableism and the Climate Movement
    Disability Rights UK - Climate change
    Curious Earth - What is Eco-ableism and how can we counter it?
    British Council - Discussing inclusive climate action with Umesh Balal Magar


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    • 38 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
68 Ratings

68 Ratings

MeanderingTwist ,

Engaging and Informative

A deep dive into nature, conservation, and the effort to improve the fragile relationship humans have to the natural world. Full of engaging discussions with expert guests who share insights on protecting wildlife habitats, our relationship with the environment, and building a brighter future for all living beings on Earth. It will deepen your understanding of the delicate balance between humans and our planet. Listen!

M1adise1 ,

Amazing Podcast

These interviews are so in-depth and I love Sarinah and Hannah as producers! Seriously great content, I learn so much every episode :)

Getupsidedidntworkforme ,

Missing me some ETH!

I've been binging old episodes during the break but I am very much looking forward to some new episodes of thoughtfully curated conversations about conserving my favorite planet! Miss you all!

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