53 episodes

An audio documentary of 70s music. This podcast examines the intersection of a wide variety of musical genres -- pop, rock, country, country-pop, disco, punk, soul -- with the historic events and decisions that helped shape our modern world.

For the Record: The 70s Amy Lively

    • Music
    • 4.9 • 125 Ratings

An audio documentary of 70s music. This podcast examines the intersection of a wide variety of musical genres -- pop, rock, country, country-pop, disco, punk, soul -- with the historic events and decisions that helped shape our modern world.

    Ep. 3 - Nostalgia, Race, and Rebels in 70s Southern Rock (Encore)

    Ep. 3 - Nostalgia, Race, and Rebels in 70s Southern Rock (Encore)

    Southern rock from bands such as the Allman Brothers and Lynyrd Skynyrd was not just loved by Americans from the South. Southern rock has broad appeal. For many white southerners, though, this form of rock tapped into a desire for nostalgia, rebellion, and a reclaiming of the South as a distinct region. This episode discusses the question of how we should think about that music now, as well as the very thorny question of what the Confederate flag has to do with any of it.

    • 38 min
    Ep. 2: Countryish Music of the 1970s (Encore)

    Ep. 2: Countryish Music of the 1970s (Encore)

    How and why did artists such as John Denver and Olivia Newton-John upset the country music establishment in the 1970s? Country radio has created the country music sound it has wanted since Elvis and rock and roll began to lure away its customers. This was not pleasing to country music purists in the 1970s. This episode discusses why more people began to listen to "countryish" music in the 70s and why it became difficult to distinguish country from other pop music. [This episode has been slightly updated since its original publication in November 2018.]

    • 32 min
    Ep. 1 - Disco Doesn't Suck (Encore)

    Ep. 1 - Disco Doesn't Suck (Encore)

    Disco and the 70s had a love-hate relationship. This episode examines who hated disco and why, as well as why it thrived in the underground until radio and the movie, "Saturday Night Fever," helped bring disco into the mainstream.
     
     
     

    • 46 min
    Ep. 50 - The Travolta Trilogy

    Ep. 50 - The Travolta Trilogy

    In just over a two-year span as the 1970s marched on toward the 1980s, John Travolta starred in three cultural touchstone movies: "Saturday Night Fever" (released on December 12, 1977), "Grease" (released on June 16, 1978), and "Urban Cowboy" (released on June 6, 1980). This episode examines the cultural significance of those films, the music in them, and how much Travolta himself had to do with the popularity of the movies.

    • 48 min
    Austin City Limits and the 70s Country Music Revolution

    Austin City Limits and the 70s Country Music Revolution

    In 1974, a local Austin PBS station aired the first episode of "Austin City Limits" and, with that, took the first step to showing the entire country how Austin, Texas celebrated and encouraged experimentation with country music. One of the founders of the show carried a business card that described the show's music as "free form country folk rock science fiction gospel gum existential bluegrass guacamole opera music." As the show celebrates it's 50th anniversary in 2024, it continues to be an example of how a commitment to music rather than glitz and glamour can find a loyal television audience.

    • 43 min
    Ep. 48 - The "Worst" of the 70s? The Music of 1974

    Ep. 48 - The "Worst" of the 70s? The Music of 1974

    The year 1974 shoulder much of the blame for the so-called worst music of not only the 1970s, but the worst of all time. Is this true? While we know that 1974 had much good to offer, is it true that it also had the worst of the worst? If so, does it matter. This episode takes a closer look at some songs considered the all-time worst, including "Seasons in the Sun" by Terry Jacks, "Cat's in the Cradle," by Harry Chapin, and "Billy, Don't Be a Hero" by Bo Donaldson and the Heywoods.

    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
125 Ratings

125 Ratings

Sdmikey ,

Love it

Just heard the 1974 episode, which was the first year I started listening to pop music on the radio. Amy does a fantastic analysis of several of the songs of that year! Especially Angie Baby. Humorous yet very insightful. I look forward to more of this podcast. Great job Amy!

gadflymr ,

Wow! Amazing!

This podcast is amazing. I spent the last 4 hours binging it. If you love all things 70s, don't walk, run to this podcast.

Pinebeers ,

Wow!

No need for this 70-year-old to continue digging through podcast after podcast this week to find anything remotely me. I adore SYSK and Ologies but after binging those, now I wait for new episodes.
But this, your intelligent and well-researched commentary on the topic closest to my heart, s my favorite by far. It makes me feel less alone in my love for that time - for I am a child of the 70s! I wish we could go through a similar hard but conscious rebirthing today. We're stale and drowning and our mass spirit pales against that of the 70s. I am drinking in your offerings as I would cold stream water from my cupped palms on a mountains hike. Your work is balanced, fair, and, well, perfect. Carry on!
Health and peace, Pine

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