86 episodes

In Game Changer, the podcast by TWS Partners, we want to share our enthusiasm and passion for game theory and its applications.

We invite guests from business and academia to discuss how they use the power of game theory in their profession to make a difference – and to learn some fun anecdotes, useful facts and valuable insights along the way. Join us on this journey, and find out that game theory is much more than a topic for ivory tower discussions.

Game Changer - the game theory podcast TWS Partners

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

In Game Changer, the podcast by TWS Partners, we want to share our enthusiasm and passion for game theory and its applications.

We invite guests from business and academia to discuss how they use the power of game theory in their profession to make a difference – and to learn some fun anecdotes, useful facts and valuable insights along the way. Join us on this journey, and find out that game theory is much more than a topic for ivory tower discussions.

    To click or not to click: can we trust sponsored search results? | with Maarten Janssen

    To click or not to click: can we trust sponsored search results? | with Maarten Janssen

    In this episode, our guest Maarten Janssen helps us to explore the field of consumer (online) search. We discuss why economists are particularly interested in this topic and explore the reliability and dynamics of sponsored search results, uncovering the nuances and implications of these prevalent online phenomena. The insights from Maarten’s research (which he conducted together with Thomas Jungbauer, Marcel Preuss and Cole Williams on one paper and with Eeva Mauring on another paper) shed light on the complex interplay between consumer behavior, search algorithms, and market dynamics.
     
    Maarten Janssen is Professor of Microeconomics at the University of Vienna. In addition to his role at the University, he is a fellow of the Centre for Economic Policy Research, a member of the Royal Holland Society of Sciences and Humanities, a research associate at the Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), and an academic affiliate at CEG Europe. Apart from consumer search, his research focusses on auctions and markets with asymmetric information. For more information about Maarten's work and to read his papers, visit his homepage here and check out his paper on sponsored search positions.

    • 28 min
    Discouraging consumption of sin goods – taxes versus nudges | with Dmitry Taubinsky

    Discouraging consumption of sin goods – taxes versus nudges | with Dmitry Taubinsky

    In this episode, we explore with Dmitry Taubinsky economic approaches on regulating sin goods such as alcohol or sugary beverages. We discuss the classical approach of taxation and Dmitry compares the approach to nudging approaches. Our discussion leads us into many further economic details: From externalities and internalities, over the question who bears the tax burden to the price elasticity of demand. Dmitry explains to us, why these effects are relevant, how they relate to each other and how they also affect the optimal taxation.
     
    Dmitry Taubinsky is an associate professor of economics at UC Berkeley and a research associate at the NBER. His research interests include Behavioral Economics and Public Economics with a special focus on the intersection of both fields using a combination of theory, experiments, and surveys as methods for the analysis of his research questions. His papers referenced in the podcast on sin taxes and nudging can be found here and here.

    • 36 min
    Hidden Games: Exploring the rationality of irrational choices | with Moshe Hoffman

    Hidden Games: Exploring the rationality of irrational choices | with Moshe Hoffman

    In this episode, we explore the often misunderstood relationship between game theory and human behaviour. Our guest Moshe Hoffman challenges the conventional belief that game theory only applies to rational actors. As Moshe explains in his book “Hidden games” (co-authored with Erez Yoeli), even seemingly irrational behaviours and preferences can be explained through game theory. We dive into the concept of 'hidden games' and their influence on our daily actions and decisions, revealing the subtle complexities of human social behaviour.
     
    Moshe Hoffman is a lecturer at Harvard's Department of Economics and at Boston College as well as an independent scholar. His interdisciplinary research bridges game theory, models of learning and evolution, and experimental methods to unravel the underpinnings of social behaviour, preferences, and ideologies. For more information on Moshe Hoffman and his work, you can visit his homepage.

    • 27 min
    Avoid sending mixed signals! – signalling in negotiations and beyond | with Uri Gneezy

    Avoid sending mixed signals! – signalling in negotiations and beyond | with Uri Gneezy

    In this episode we are talking to Uri Gneezy about his latest book publication “Mixed Signals – How Incentives Really Work”. He explains to us what mixed signals are and makes us aware that we encounter them far more frequently than one would expect. We deep dive into the topic in the context of negotiations where signaling plays a major role. Uri walks us through the different effects that are at play when the opening offer in a negotiation is communicated to the other party and makes clear why it should neither be too high nor too low.
     
    Uri Gneezy holds the Epstein/Atkinson Endowed Chair in Behavioral Economics at the University of California, San Diego's Rady School of Management. His research interests are at the intersection of economic theory and application and include topics such as incentives-based interventions to increase good habits and decrease bad ones, Pay-What-You-Want pricing, and the detrimental effects of small and large incentives. In addition to this he is author of the books “The Why Axis: Hidden Motives and the Undiscovered Economics of Everyday Life” and “Mixed Signals – How Incentives Really Work” which was published in 2023.

    • 22 min
    The Economist's Brain: Tracing Choices with Neuroeconomic Insights | with Juan D. Carrillo

    The Economist's Brain: Tracing Choices with Neuroeconomic Insights | with Juan D. Carrillo

    In this episode, we explore together with our guest Juan D. Carrillo the confluence of economics and neuroscience in understanding human decision-making processes. We delve into how the combination of these two disciplines can illuminate the biological basis of decision making, with a particular focus on complex scenarios like multi-task decision making, self-control, and impulsivity. Juan shares insights from his papers, discussing the innovative approach of neuroeconomic theory and its real-world applications.
     
    Juan D. Carrillo is a Professor of Economics at the University of Southern California and a Research Fellow in the Industrial Organization and Public Policy programs at the Center for Economic Policy Research (CEPR). His research spans Neuroeconomic Theory and Experimental Economics, blending insights from neuroscience and economics to understand decision-making processes. Additionally, Juan co-directs the Los Angeles Behavioral Economics Laboratory (LABEL), focusing on experimental research in economic decision-making and strategic interactions.
    You can find out more about his research on his homepage and read the papers that are discussed in this episode here and here.

    • 27 min
    Feeding America – allocating food to food banks with innovative market mechanisms | with Canice Prendergast

    Feeding America – allocating food to food banks with innovative market mechanisms | with Canice Prendergast

    In this episode, we discuss with Canice Prendergast how market design mechanisms can be applied in social services. Canice shares how he collaborated with Feeding America on optimally allocating about 300 million pounds of food per year to hundreds of food banks across the United States. They were developing a market-based allocation mechanism introducing an internal currency to bid for available food on a daily basis. Canice shares the process itself as well as many anecdotes on its development and introduction. 
    Canice Prendergast is W. Allen Wallis Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. He is an economist specialising in economic theory, labour economics, and organizational behaviour.

    • 38 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
3 Ratings

3 Ratings

Keynes360 ,

Game Theory meets practice

Great discussions on application of game theory in consulting. Good conversation without getting too nerdy.

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