99 episodes

Legacy Code Rocks explores the world of modernizing existing software applications. Hosts Andrea Goulet and M. Scott Ford of Corgibytes are out to change the way you think about legacy code.

If you’re like a lot of people, when you hear the words “legacy code” it conjures up images of big mainframes and archaic punch card machines. While that’s true — it only tells a small part of the story. The truth is, the code you leave behind is your legacy, so let's make it a good one.

Legacy Code Rocks Andrea Goulet and M. Scott Ford

    • Technology
    • 4.8 • 13 Ratings

Legacy Code Rocks explores the world of modernizing existing software applications. Hosts Andrea Goulet and M. Scott Ford of Corgibytes are out to change the way you think about legacy code.

If you’re like a lot of people, when you hear the words “legacy code” it conjures up images of big mainframes and archaic punch card machines. While that’s true — it only tells a small part of the story. The truth is, the code you leave behind is your legacy, so let's make it a good one.

    Cloud Therapy with Bobby Allen

    Cloud Therapy with Bobby Allen

    We behave with the cloud as a subset of technology like a teen who just learned how to drive. We are at the point where capabilities have far exceeded the ability to comprehend consequences. We have the power in our hands to change our life and other people's lives both in positive and negative ways. However, we lack the experience to foresee these results. 
    Today we talk with Bobby Allen, Vice President of Strategic Alliances at Turbonomic and cloud therapist. He helps us understand the advantages and pitfalls of the cloud and teaches us how to assess our own needs and the risks we might face while using the technology. 
    When you finish listening to the episode, make sure to connect with Bobby on Twitter and LinkedIn, and visit his website at https://bobbyjallen.me. 
    Mentioned in this episode:
    Bobby on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/ballen-clt/
    Bobby on Twitter at https://twitter.com/ballen_clt
    Bobby’s website at https://bobbyjallen.me
    Turbonomic at https://www.turbonomic.com 

    • 46 min
    Economics of Technical Debt with Jim Humelsine

    Economics of Technical Debt with Jim Humelsine

    Technical debt is a recurring theme of this show. We talk about it almost as often as it pops out in any legacy code! Today we go back to discussing technical debt with Jim Humelsine. Jim has been a software development professional since 1985. Jim's passion is design patterns, but he recently expanded his interest to software practices and procedures. Jim is also an economics and especially game theory enthusiast, and on top of everything, he is a trombone player! We dive deep with Jim into the economics of technical debt, the root causes of its ever-presence, and the ways to get rid of it. When you finish listening to the episode, make sure to connect with Jim on Twitter and LinkedIn. 
    Mentioned in this episode:
    Jim on Twitter at https://twitter.com/jhumelsine
    Jim on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/james-humelsine-16b0749/
    Freakonomics podcast at https://freakonomics.com/archive/

    • 46 min
    Adding Tests to Legacy Systems with Floyd Hilton

    Adding Tests to Legacy Systems with Floyd Hilton

    Many legacy systems lack adequate test coverage. They might not have much coverage at all, or the existing tests might be inefficient or paint a wrong picture about the stability of the system. Enhancing test coverage in legacy applications is a complex task with many pitfalls. 
    Today we talk with Floyd Hilton, a software developer with many years of experience in multiple domains, including semiconductor manufacturing, financial aid delivery, energy conservation, and healthcare. He co-founded the Augusta Polyglot Group, which meets once a month to teach and learn new languages. Floyd's current interest is in finding the best strategies for adding testing to existing software systems. He shares with us some of these strategies and the tools he uses when beefing up test coverage in legacy systems. 
    When you finish listening to the episode, make sure to connect with Floyd on Twitter and LinkedIn, and visit his website at http://www.floydhilton.com, 
    Mentioned in this episode:
    Floyd on Twitter at https://twitter.com/fhilton
    Floyd on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/floydhilton/
    Floyd’s website at http://www.floydhilton.com
    Augusta Polyglot Group at https://augusta-polyglot.github.io
    DbUp at https://dbup.readthedocs.io/en/latest/
    Cypress at https://www.cypress.io 

    • 33 min
    Public Cloud in the Service of Applications with Sarah Musick

    Public Cloud in the Service of Applications with Sarah Musick

    There has been a noticeable uptick in the adoption of public cloud providers. At the same time, the voices advocating for the abandonment of traditional data centers are getting louder. Keeping servers around to keep running their business might be overkill for many companies. For others, it could be the only reasonable choice. And even if you decide to transition to the cloud, how do you know which of its features you need? 
    Today we talk to Sarah Musick, the systems engineering principal at CloudGenera, a workload placement decision engine, where she spearheads the onboarding efforts with enterprise customers. Sarah is a big believer in the targeted adoption of the public cloud in tech - the approach based on the understanding that the cloud should serve the application rather than the other way around. She helps us understand how to assess our data management needs and how to choose the options that best serve those needs.  
    When you finish listening to the episode, make sure you connect with Sarah on LinkedIn and visit CloudGenera website.
    Mentioned in this episode:
    Sarah Musick on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sarahlmusick/ 
    CloudGenera Website: https://go.cloudgenera.com 

    • 49 min
    Legacy in Functional Programming With Eric Normand

    Legacy in Functional Programming With Eric Normand

    Common Lisp was written in the 80s as a kind of an amalgam of the existing Lisps at the time. To make sure the Common Lisp would stay relevant, it was made backward compatible so that existing legacy systems could run on it. One thing in common to these big old systems like Lisp is a lot more mutation, and the cool thing about this legacy is that it has a baked experience – it learns and it has learned.
    Today we talk to Eric Normand, an experienced functional programmer, trainer, speaker, and consultant on all things functional programming. He started writing Lisp in 2000 and is now a Clojure expert, producing the most comprehensive suite of Clojure training material at purelyfunctional.tv. He also consults with companies to use functional programming to better serve business objectives. 
    We talk about problems in legacy code basis utilizing functional programming, the abstract nature of programs, the wisdom of Lisp, and more. 
    When you’re done listening to the episode, make sure to check out Eric’s Clojure training and his podcast, as well as connect with him on LinkedIn.
    Mentioned in this episode:
    Eric Normand on LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/eric-normand-61a70366/
    Eric Normand’s podcast: Lispcast.com
    Eric Normand’s websites: https://lispcast.com and https://purelyfunctional.tv 
    Eric Normand’s Clojure training: Purelyfunctional.tv
    Eric Normand’s book Grokking Simplicity: https://www.manning.com/books/grokking-simplicity?utm_source=lispcast&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=book_normand_grokking_8_20_19&a_aid=lispcast&a_bid=72596968Use discount code TSSIMPLICITY for 50% off.

    • 49 min
    The Value of Old with Marianne Bellotti

    The Value of Old with Marianne Bellotti

    Software engineers perceive that technology advances in an orderly, linear fashion. This makes the novelties very attractive. However, the reality is that we tend to go through technology in cycles.  Recognizing this is crucial for understanding how to make the right technical decisions while preserving the value of the old technology. 
    Is it better to build from scratch or build on what you have? When do you invest in something brand new, and when do you lean onto the foundations of the existing expertise? 
    Today we search for answers to these questions with Marianne Bellotti, the author of Kill It with Fire –Manage Aging Computer Systems (and Futureproof Modern Ones). Marianne is internationally known for tackling some of the oldest, messiest, and most complicated computer systems in the world, and she currently runs identity and access control at Rebellion Defense. 
    When you finish listening to the episode, make sure you follow Marianne on Twitter and get a copy of her book.
    Mentioned in this episode:
    Marianne Bellotti on Twitter at https://twitter.com/bellmar 
    Marianne Bellotti, Kill It with Fire –Manage Aging Computer Systems (and Futureproof Modern Ones) at https://www.amazon.com/Kill-Fire-Manage-Computer-Systems/dp/1718501188  
    Rebellion Defence at https://rebelliondefense.com

    • 51 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
13 Ratings

13 Ratings

etagwerker ,

Great Interviews About Legacy Code and Maintainability

I really like the way Andrea and M. Scott lead their interviews. Questions are insightful and their guests are top-notch software engineers.

I wish there were more podcasts like Legacy Code Rocks! I feel like as an industry, we don’t talk enough about maintainability, mending code, and legacy projects. :D

Ckhrysze ,

Making me rethink thoughts on legacy code

I became aware of this podcast when one of the hosts appeared on another. I've only listened to a few episodes thus far, but am enoying it and how it is causing me to reflect on how I approach legacy code.

poornima ,

Podcast that exposes people to the importance of doing rework

A much needed podcast for people who are faced with rework, when it comes to building products and companies, and how to stay motivated by doing it.

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