38 episodes

Does your child struggle with reading and writing? Do you suspect they have dyslexia? Real world answers to all your questions about dyslexia and ways to help your child is exactly what your get when you tune into the Literacy Untangled Podcast with your host, educator and dyslexia interventionist, Jennie Sjursen. Her specialty? Breaking down the complexities of dyslexia into everyday language, strategies, and action steps. Tune in, get inspired, and discover why parents across the globe reach out to Jennie for advice and support on all things related to dyslexia, reading, writing, academic testing, school supports, and IEP’s. Start finding answers to your questions today!

Literacy Untangled Podcast Jennie Sjursen

    • Kids & Family
    • 4.5 • 6 Ratings

Does your child struggle with reading and writing? Do you suspect they have dyslexia? Real world answers to all your questions about dyslexia and ways to help your child is exactly what your get when you tune into the Literacy Untangled Podcast with your host, educator and dyslexia interventionist, Jennie Sjursen. Her specialty? Breaking down the complexities of dyslexia into everyday language, strategies, and action steps. Tune in, get inspired, and discover why parents across the globe reach out to Jennie for advice and support on all things related to dyslexia, reading, writing, academic testing, school supports, and IEP’s. Start finding answers to your questions today!

    #37 Can My Dyslexic Child Really Get Multisensory Instruction Online?

    #37 Can My Dyslexic Child Really Get Multisensory Instruction Online?

     

    Some things aren’t as good online as they are “in real life,” but multisensory learning isn’t one of them! In this episode, I share how multisensory learning instruction can be carried out effectively online, specific tools to use, and examples of this in practice. 

    When I first began my training, I thought multisensory instruction could only be done in person. Fast forward to now, I fully provide this service online! Multisensory instruction simultaneously ties in visual, auditory, kinesthetic, and tactile instruction, also known as VAKT, so that a student uses all the pathways of the brain at the same time. 

    Some ways this can be achieved include the use of digital letter tiles, interactive online games, skywriting, digital drawing tools, and typing. I offer two examples of this in practice, one an auditory drill and the other a grapheme learning exercise. Multisensory learning online will often look different online than in person, requiring some extra creativity, preparation, and materials, but it is an entirely impactful way to offer multisensory learning online. 

    Have a question or want a certain topic covered? Send us an email or a DM on Instagram.

    I want to support parents with dyslexic children and get this content in the hands of those who need it most. Click the share button and send away! Thank you.

    Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or on your favorite podcast platform.

    Topics Covered:


    What is multisensory instruction?
    Ways to be multisensory online 
    Auditory drill example
    Grapheme learning example

    Resources Mentioned:


    Episode 16, Multisensory instruction: What is it?

    Connect: 


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    • 6 min
    #36 Do I Really Have to Teach My Dyslexic Child Grammar and Punctuation?

    #36 Do I Really Have to Teach My Dyslexic Child Grammar and Punctuation?

    The difference between “Let’s eat, Grandma” and “Let’s eat Grandma” is substantial! Grammar and punctuation provide clarity and understanding that, without them, make language hard to understand. Today, I’m discussing the importance of teaching dyslexic children grammar and punctuation and three tips for helping your child learn these nuances.

     

    All aspects of language, reading, writing, and speaking, are connected with each other in a symbiotic and circular relationship. If we leave out educating our children about grammar, they miss out on a very important part of communication. I go into the million-dollar mistake Lockheed Martin made by omitting a few commas. 

     

    Here are three ways to introduce this aspect of language. First, teach them parts of speech and parts of a sentence. I share a tactile, color-based method using Legos to illustrate how sentences are put together. Second, find real-life examples of bad grammar to discuss how sentences can have different meanings with and without the correct punctuation. Finally, talk about grammar and punctuation often! Dyslexic verbal comprehension is often miles ahead of their reading comprehension. Talking through a problem while showing them is key. 

     

    Have a question or want a certain topic covered? Send us an email or a DM on Instagram.

     

    I want to support parents with dyslexic children and get this content in the hands of those who need it most. Click the share button and send away! Thank you. 

     

    Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or on your favorite podcast platform.

     

    Topics Covered:


    The importance of punctuation and grammar
    Lockheed Martin’s pricey missing comma 
    Tips for teaching the parts of a sentence
    Real-life examples of bad grammar 
    Why you should talk about grammar often with your dyslexic child 

     

    Connect: 


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    • 5 min
    #35 7 Ways to Help the Dyslexic in Your Life Find and Give Themselves Grace

    #35 7 Ways to Help the Dyslexic in Your Life Find and Give Themselves Grace

    We’ve all heard that pesky little voice in our heads say something like, “Well, you should’ve done XYZ, but you didn’t.” Many dyslexics experience negative self-talk. I know I have! Reminding ourselves to be graceful in these moments, while sometimes easier said than done, is the only way through it. Today, I’m sharing 7 ways that you can help the dyslexic in your life give themselves grace. 


    Educate your child on dyslexia and reinforce that their intelligence is not defined by it. 
    Keep the lines of communication open. Encourage them to share their struggles and feelings and reinforce that they are supported
    Focus on their strengths, not their weaknesses. Highlight the ways they can do something better than you can!
    Set realistic expectations. This one can be tricky because it's so hard to stop comparing ourselves to others. Try circling back to where they were a year ago and admire the significant progress that they have made. 
    Focus on the effort made, not just the results. Trying is way more important than getting something right or wrong. 
    Normalize mistakes. They are part of the learning process!
    Model self-compassion. 

    Have a question or want a certain topic covered? Send us an email or a DM on Instagram.

    I want to support parents with dyslexic children and get this content in the hands of those who need it most. Click the share button and send away! Thank you. 

    Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or on your favorite podcast platform.

    Topics Covered:


    Busyness and negative self-talk
    The importance of grace
    7 ways to support the dyslexic in your life
    Modelling self-compassion

    Connect: 


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    • 7 min
    #34 How to Help Your Dyslexic Child Find Their Passion

    #34 How to Help Your Dyslexic Child Find Their Passion

    If you do a quick Google search, you'll find so many examples of successful adults with dyslexia who have found their passion and are thriving. Some of the famous personalities include director Steven Spielberg, actor Keira Knightley, basketball player Magic Johnson, and author Agatha Christie. In this episode, you'll hear practical advice and strategies for helping your child with dyslexia find their calling.  

    As a parent, you can help your child find their passion by encouraging them to explore various activities and interests to identify and nurture their strengths. Creating a positive learning environment at home and introducing hands-on experiences and assistive technology can promote confidence in your child. Also, remember to celebrate every success, no matter how small, to support your child and their journey to finding what makes them thrive! 

     

    When you're ready to work with me, here are 3 ways I can help you:

    Join the waitlist to find out when my long-awaited course, Untangling Dyslexia: From Identification to IEP, opens up again!

    Subscribe to my Podcast, Literacy Untangled Podcast, for bimonthly episodes on navigating the dyslexia journey with your kid.

    Want 1:1 help from an Orton-Gillingham expert? Book a call to see how I help kids who are struggling to learn how to read.

     

    Have a question or want a certain topic covered? Send us an email or a DM on Instagram.

    I want to support parents with dyslexic children and get this content in the hands of those who need it most. Click the share button and send away! Thank you. 

    Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or on your favorite podcast platform.

    Topics Covered:


    What is a passion? 
    Encouraging your child to explore
    Using assistive technology
    Celebrating small successes

    Connect: 


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    • 4 min
    #33 What Does a Typical IEP Agenda Look Like?

    #33 What Does a Typical IEP Agenda Look Like?

    IEP season is here and many of us are getting ready to attend our (first) IEP meetings. If you’re a parent of a dyslexic student, you may be curious about what to expect. In this episode, I break down the IEP agenda process and share what to expect before and during an IEP meeting.

    IEP stands for Individualized Education Program — a personalized learning plan for a child with a qualifying disability. The IEP outlines present levels, goals, services, and accommodations a child will receive in a given calendar year. The IEP agenda typically looks like this:

    Before the IEP Meeting:

    Take this time to collect relevant information and data, and start to draft out your Parent Statement. Every school is different about receiving the Parent Statement. Some may ask for it before the meeting, others wait until you’re at the IEP meeting. 

    Day of the IEP Meeting:When you arrive on the day of the meeting, you’ll be escorted to a conference room, office, or empty classroom. Everyone will introduce themselves: Your child’s case manager, their General Education Teacher, their Special Education Teacher, any other significant faculty members, and you. An attendance sheet is passed around to confirm you attended the meeting. 

    School Evaluation:The school team members review your child’s present levels of performance obtained through classwork, assessments, and observations. A child is reevaluated every three years. If your meeting falls on a triennial year, present levels will also be obtained through formal evaluations from a school psychologist, Speech-Language Pathologist, Behavior Interventionist, and/or Occupational Therapist. 

    Goals:

    After this, you’ll share parent input regarding observations, concerns, and goals for your child’s education. The data collected during assessments and observation drives everything else. The goals should relate to the data gathered during the assessments and present levels. Goals should be achievable within one calendar year. 

    Accommodations:

    Once everyone agrees on the set goals, it’s time to determine which services and accommodations can support your child in reaching their goals. This includes the frequency of services and accommodations and who is responsible for the set services and accommodations. 

    IEP Draft:During this process, the IEP is drafted and updated in front of you so that you can see changes made in real-time. Take your time and thoroughly read through the draft before signing anything. You do not need to sign the IEP during the draft meeting. You can review and research the draft and call a follow-up meeting.  

    Finalize IEP:

    Lastly, if everyone agrees, all members of the IEP team — including parents — will sign the IEP. If you feel that the IEP is not serving your child, you can call an IEP meeting and ask for changes to be made. You do not have to wait until your annual IEP meeting. 

    Have a question or want a certain topic covered? Send us an email or a DM on Instagram.

    I want to support parents with dyslexic children and get this content in the hands of those who need it most. Click the share button and send away! Thank you. 

    Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or on your favorite podcast platform.

    Topics Covered:


    Before the IEP Meeting
    Day of the IEP Meeting
    IEP School Evaluation 
    IEP Goals
    IEP Accommodations 
    IEP Draft
    IEP Finalization 

    Connect: 


    Visit my website 
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    • 7 min
    #32 Are Audiobooks Cheating?

    #32 Are Audiobooks Cheating?

    Are audiobooks and immersion readers just a new way to cheat? The short answer is no. In this episode, I share information on audiobooks and immersion readers, and the positive impact they can have on reading difficulties for dyslexic students. 

     

    Research shows that using audiobooks and immersion readers (also called ear readers) can only help increase your child’s reading skills. Reading difficulties can lead to anxiety, specifically for students with dyslexia. Audiobooks can alleviate this anxiety by providing an alternative way of accessing information and contributing to the development of vocabulary and pronunciation. Since students with dyslexia may struggle with reading and decoding unfamiliar words and phrases, hearing words can be particularly beneficial. 

     

    Audiobooks can also help develop background knowledge and support grade-level content. A dyslexic spends so much trying to decode words in a sentence they often can't fully comprehend what they read, but audiobooks bypass this challenge. They also allow dyslexic students to stay on track with their peers and fully participate in class. Our goal is to teach students how to learn on their own, not to regurgitate information. 

     

    Have a question or want a certain topic covered? Send us an email or a DM on Instagram.

     

    I want to support parents with dyslexic children and get this content in the hands of those who need it most. Click the share button and send away! 

     

    Listen to the episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or on your favorite podcast platform.

     

    Topics Covered:


    Are audiobooks and immersion readers cheating?
    A 2007 study on “listening to learn”
    A 2013 study on audiobooks for reading comprehension
    Benefits of audio learning 
    How dyslexic students respond to audio learning 

     

    Resources Mentioned:


    2007 Study: Learning Through Listening in the Digital World 
    2013 Study: The Impact of Audiobooks on Reading Comprehension and Reading Attitude in A Swedish Comprehensive School Setting - Elsabeth Wahlberg 

     

    Connect: 


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    • 6 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

Gretchen Kuhsel ,

A Must-Listen If Anyone In Your Life Has Dyslexia

Jennie is a qualified voice on all things dyslexia. She breaks down the complicated, siloed special education system and shares her expertise on how to navigate it. This podcast is the perfect resource for parents and caretakers who want to understand what a child with dyslexia experiences and how to best support them.

Nao2484 ,

Podcast graphic is insulting

With the podcaster being a white woman, trying to understand why the imaging on this is a black family? Is there some hidden inference?
Appreciate the mission, but my suggestion is to change it to incorporate many shades of skin (as many of all shades struggle) or remove to not offend others and have a photo of the host or an object.

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