12 min

Maladies and mice. Pre-clinical vaccine development Vaccines - From Concept to Clinic with Oxford Sparks

    • Education

Approaches used to target particularly tricky diseases to treat, such as malaria, HIV, Flu and TB. Whilst many of the world’s major diseases can be targeted by vaccines there is a drastic need for new or improved vaccines against a number of the most deadly including HIV, malaria, Tuberculosis and Influenza. In this episode we discuss why these diseases and others have been particularly difficult to target by vaccination and the approaches currently being used in the development of vaccines targeting them. Featuring guests, Lynda Coughlan and Rachel Tanner. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Approaches used to target particularly tricky diseases to treat, such as malaria, HIV, Flu and TB. Whilst many of the world’s major diseases can be targeted by vaccines there is a drastic need for new or improved vaccines against a number of the most deadly including HIV, malaria, Tuberculosis and Influenza. In this episode we discuss why these diseases and others have been particularly difficult to target by vaccination and the approaches currently being used in the development of vaccines targeting them. Featuring guests, Lynda Coughlan and Rachel Tanner. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

12 min

Top Podcasts In Education

The Mel Robbins Podcast
Mel Robbins
The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast
Dr. Jordan B. Peterson
Mick Unplugged
Mick Hunt
Digital Social Hour
Sean Kelly
School Business Insider
John Brucato
Do The Work
Do The Work

More by Oxford University

Theoretical Physics - From Outer Space to Plasma
Oxford University
Approaching Shakespeare
Oxford University
Philosophy for Beginners
Oxford University
The Secrets of Mathematics
Oxford University
Computer Science
Oxford University
Critical Reasoning: A Romp Through the Foothills of Logic
Oxford University