500 episodes

Podcast by MontanaHistoricalSociety

MontanaHistoricalSociet‪y‬ MontanaHistoricalSociety

    • Education
    • 4.4 • 22 Ratings

Podcast by MontanaHistoricalSociety

    Cheyenne and Lakota Women and the Battle of the Little Bighorn

    Cheyenne and Lakota Women and the Battle of the Little Bighorn

    Dr. Leila Monaghan, professor of anthropology at Northern Arizona University, provides insight into the important, but little known, material, military, and spiritual assistance that women provided before, during, and after the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Using the testimony of Cheyenne and Lakota women—Antelope, Pretty White Buffalo, Moving Robe, Julia Face, and others—Monaghan describes the battle as women experienced it: ensuring their family’s safety, rallying their warriors with “strongheart songs,” capturing runaway horses, nursing the wounded, landing death blows to injured enemy soldiers, engaging in direct combat, and performing rites for the dead. (9/28/2019)

    • 29 min
    The Survivors: The Changing Montana Timber Industry

    The Survivors: The Changing Montana Timber Industry

    At their peak, Montana lumber mills employed more than 13,000 workers in over three hundred sawmills. Today fifteen mills with 2,700 employees remain. Retired Montana Historical Society library manager Brian Shovers examines the reasons for the decline and the persistence of smaller family-owned mills. (9/28/2019)

    • 17 min
    Clear-cut Crisis: The Bitterroot Forest in the 1970s

    Clear-cut Crisis: The Bitterroot Forest in the 1970s

    Adept at both political and business manipulations, timber baron A. B. Hammond emerged as one of Montana’s wealthiest and most powerful individuals. Dale Burk, owner of Stevensville’s Stoneydale Press and a former journalist, explores the practice of clear-cutting on the Bitterroot National Forest during the 1950s and 1960s. Burk’s reporting in the Missoulian during the early 1970s ultimately led to a major reform of logging practices on U.S. Forest Service lands nationwide. (9/28/2019)

    • 23 min
    Yellowstone Obsidian: Making It Accessible to the Public

    Yellowstone Obsidian: Making It Accessible to the Public

    Native Americans were Montana and Wyoming’s original hard-rock miners, conducting extensive pit and trench excavation at important sources of stone, including several obsidian sources in Yellowstone National Park. In his talk, University of Montana professor of anthropology Dr. Doug MacDonald describes the traditional use of two important obsidian sources in Yellowstone—Obsidian Cliff and Cougar Creek—and proposes ideas on ways to better utilize these sites in interpreting the park’s Native American past.

    • 23 min
    Indians, Amateurs, and Archaeologists

    Indians, Amateurs, and Archaeologists

    Although home to indigenous nomadic peoples for more than ten thousand years, Montana remained one of the last regions to attract academically trained archaeologists. Montana State University instructor and PhD student Nancy Mahoney considers how, between 1880 and 1950, this lapse allowed a thriving community of amateurs and avocationalists to amass collections of Native artifacts, a practice that has ongoing consequences for the public stewardship of Montana’s prehistoric past.

    • 24 min
    Incorporating Libby’s Toxic Past into the 21st Century

    Incorporating Libby’s Toxic Past into the 21st Century

    Libby’s past was based in natural resource extraction, predominately logging and mining. Today, however, neither industry exists to underpin the economy and provide employment. Montana State University PhD candidate Jennifer Dunn examines what aspects of its history Libby chooses to highlight as it re-creates its image as a pristine outdoor destination.

    • 27 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
22 Ratings

22 Ratings

Jack2 from Lost Prairie ,

Short is Sweet

I disagree with the other reviewers. Keep the episodes under 5 minutes so they continue to fit into my daily commute. I love learning about Montana one interesting story at a time. The regularity keeps drawing me back to my chosen home.

To get the most of short episodes, I use Stations or Auto Playlists. They allow me to run a variety of programs through on my 20-minute daily commute. If you’re annoyed by having to start new episodes after one plays, check your podcast app for this feature so you can rotate through your favorite short subscriptions like an endless playlist.

buns28 ,

quality is👎

not good *ECHO Echo echo*

j l rue ,

Great info, poor sound quality

I love the info that is provided here, but the sound quality is so poor I rarely listen to a full episode.

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