6 episodes

Zayd Dohrn was born underground - his parents were radicals and counter-culture outlaws, on the run from the FBI. Now Zayd takes us back to the 1970s, when his parents and their young friends in the Weather Underground Organization declared war on the United States government. They brawled with riot cops on the streets of Chicago, bombed the Pentagon and the U.S. Capitol, broke comrades out of prison, and teamed up with Black militant groups to rob banks, fight racism - and help build a revolution.

Mother Country Radicals Crooked Media

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.7 • 258 Ratings

Zayd Dohrn was born underground - his parents were radicals and counter-culture outlaws, on the run from the FBI. Now Zayd takes us back to the 1970s, when his parents and their young friends in the Weather Underground Organization declared war on the United States government. They brawled with riot cops on the streets of Chicago, bombed the Pentagon and the U.S. Capitol, broke comrades out of prison, and teamed up with Black militant groups to rob banks, fight racism - and help build a revolution.

    Chapter 1: The Most Dangerous Woman in America

    Chapter 1: The Most Dangerous Woman in America

    In 1970, a former law student named Bernardine Dohrn declared war on the United States government. Decades later, her son Zayd Ayers Dohrn tells the story of how his mother was radicalized, and became the most wanted woman in America. 

    For more of the story, check out: 

    Students for a Democratic Society, The Port Huron Statement (1962)

    Revolutionary Youth Movement, "The Weatherman Paper" (1969)


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    • 56 min
    Chapter 2: Days of Rage

    Chapter 2: Days of Rage

    Zayd’s father Bill Ayers joins the Weathermen, and he and his friends teach themselves to be revolutionaries, gearing up to build bombs and brawl with police on the streets of Chicago.

    For more of the story, check out: 
    Gillo Pontecorvo, The Battle of Algiers (1966)
    Carlos Marighella, The Mini-Manual of the Urban Guerrilla (1969)
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    • 50 min
    Chapter 3: I Am A Revolutionary

    Chapter 3: I Am A Revolutionary

    Jamal Joseph is radicalized at 15, and joins the New York Black Panthers. And a deadly attack by Chicago Police puts both Panthers and Weathermen on a path towards violent revolution. 

    For more of the story, check out: 
    Jamal Joseph, Panther Baby: A Life of Rebellion and Reinvention (2012)
    Stanley Nelson, The Black Panther Party: Vanguard of the Revolution (2016)
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    • 47 min
    Chapter 4: Bring the War Home

    Chapter 4: Bring the War Home

    The Weathermen decide to bring the horrors of the Vietnam War back to America’s doorstep, planning an action that will change the future of the organization, and Zayd’s family, forever.

    For more of the story, check out: 
    Bill Ayers, Fugitive Days: Memoirs of an Antiwar Activist (2001)
    Cathy Wilkerson, Flying Close to the Sun: My Life and Times as a Weatherman (2007)
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    • 42 min
    Chapter 5: New Morning

    Chapter 5: New Morning

    The Weathermen go underground, and become famous - and infamous - as counter-culture outlaws.

    For more of the story, check out: 
    Thai Jones, A Radical Line: From the Labor Movement to the Weather Underground (2004)
    Timothy Leary, The Psychedelic Experience (1964)
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    • 44 min
    Mother Country Radicals coming June 9

    Mother Country Radicals coming June 9

    Zayd Dohrn was born underground - his parents were founders of the Weather Underground organization, and on the run from the FBI. Now Zayd takes us back to the 1970s, when his parents and their young friends brawled with riot cops on the streets of Chicago, bombed the Pentagon and the U.S. Capitol, and teamed up with Black militant groups to rob banks, fight racism - and help build a revolution.
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    • 3 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
258 Ratings

258 Ratings

Goshinkansen ,

Captivating

I find the story and the storytelling to be utterly mesmerizing. Can’t wait for each episode to come out. When it’s over, I’ll miss it.

podcastlover_-_31 ,

Political Garbage

Here’s a direct quote from the first episode: “That’s just another example of why white people can’t be trusted.” Imagine someone making the reciprocal of that statement. This is glorifying racists and domestic terrorists. Very clearly left wing extremist propaganda.

KnitFitt ,

Memories and Sorrow

This podcast has taken me back to my own life. I remember when representatives of SDS were recruiting on my college campus. Adamantly opposed to the war and a budding feminist, it was natural for me to join. I dropped out because I felt Women’s voices were ignored. One weekend my temporary boyfriend and I stopped at a house for him to complete a errand. There was a meeting of SDS leaders at a house in an affluent bedroom community in Connecticut. They were lazing around the family pool and ignored me. I thought they were hypocrites.
A few years later, I joined a commune in Dorchester, Massachusetts, a working class neighborhood near Boston. We studied the same revolutionary books and pamphlets, painted slogans on walls, had criticism circles, attempted to smash monogamy. I failed practicing urban escapes because I couldn’t get over moderately tall fences.
My life turned in a different direction. I suffered a long time from the trauma of those years and I had only been on the periphery.

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