99 episodes

Nothing Never Happens is a journey into cutting-edge pedagogical theory and praxis, where co-hosts Tina Pippin and Lucia Hulsether connect with leading voices in radical teaching and learning. We engage a range of approaches — including but not limited to democratic, feminist, queer, decolonial, and abolitionist models.

Nothing Never Happens Nothing Never Happens

    • Education
    • 4.9 • 24 Ratings

Nothing Never Happens is a journey into cutting-edge pedagogical theory and praxis, where co-hosts Tina Pippin and Lucia Hulsether connect with leading voices in radical teaching and learning. We engage a range of approaches — including but not limited to democratic, feminist, queer, decolonial, and abolitionist models.

    "Links in the Chain of Freedom": A Conversation with Loretta Ross

    "Links in the Chain of Freedom": A Conversation with Loretta Ross

    What becomes possible when we anchor our pedagogical praxes in frameworks of reproductive justice and intersectional feminist care? What coalitions grow? What visions are revealed, and what worlds become more possible?
    Teacher, organizer, storyteller, and freedom-fighter Loretta Ross shares her wisdom on these questions and so much more. From judicial attacks on reproductive autonomy, to politicized teaching in a democratic classroom, to the history of Black women's organizing, to creative and effective protest tactics, to the "rotating international favorites" served at the West Point Military Academy dinner club.
    Loretta Ross is a movement visionary recently recognized as a Class of 2022 MacArthur Genius Fellow. After working at the Center for Democratic Renewal in Atlanta, she went on to found and then become the National Coordinator of SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective. She has taught very widely, in and out of the university, as Founder of the National Center for Human Rights Education, as Program Director of the National Black Women's Health Project, and now as the Associate Professor in the Program on Women and Gender at Smith College.
    She is a prolific author, whose authored and co-authored works include Reproductive Justice: An Introduction (2017), Radical Reproductive Justice: Foundation, Theory, Practice, Critique (2017), and Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organizing for Reproductive Justice (2004). Her forthcoming book, Calling In the Calling Out Culture, will be out in 2023.
    Credits: Outro Music by Akrasis (Max Bowen, raps; Mark McKee, beats); audio editing by Aliyah Harris; production by Lucia Hulsether and Tina Pippin.
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    • 1 hr 12 min
    Southern Spaces, Southern Changes: Educating for Environmental Justice

    Southern Spaces, Southern Changes: Educating for Environmental Justice

    How can we ground our classrooms in praxes of environmental justice? How can teachers and learners build ethical connections to local communities mobilizing against climate emergency and structural abandonment?
    Scholar-activist Ellen Spears joins us to discuss these questions and more. Prof. Spears is a Professor of American Studies at the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa. She is a prolific author, whose most recent books include the award-winning Baptized in PCBs: Race, Religion, Pollution, and Justice in an All-American Town (2014) and Rethinking the American Environmental Movement Post-1945 (2019). She was part of the Task Force on History, Slavery, and Civil Rights at the UA-Tuscaloosa. Her courses range from comparative ecologies, to environmental ethics and policy, to environment and film.
    Co-Hosts: Lucia Hulsether and Tina Pippin
    Music by Akrasis
    Image by LL Sammons via Unsplash

    • 1 hr 5 min
    No Study Without Struggle: A Conversation with Leigh Patel

    No Study Without Struggle: A Conversation with Leigh Patel

    As calls to decolonize education multiply across contexts and institutions, we must push this issue beyond optics and return to the question: what does commitment to decolonization demand? What risks and struggles? What experiments and solidarities?
    Leigh Patel guides us as we embark on a deep dive into these urgent questions as they ramify across scales. Refusing to partition study from struggle, Patel exposes the settler colonial processes that continue to shape higher education, even as she lifts up radical projects of education otherwise.
    Leigh Patel is Professor of Educational Foundations, Organizations, and Policy in the University of Pittsburgh School of Education. Her most recent book is No Study without Struggle: Confronting Settler Colonialism in Higher Education.

    • 1 hr 28 min
    Resistance Pedagogy: Truth, Healing, and Justice in Atlanta Public Schools

    Resistance Pedagogy: Truth, Healing, and Justice in Atlanta Public Schools

    Amid the newest wave of attacks on public education and inclusive learning, there are stories of hope and resistance. In this episode we talk with a high school social studies teacher at the front of the fight for antiracist, liberatory K-12 classrooms. Anthony Downer teaches Africana Studies, social studies, and civics at Frederick Douglass High School in the Atlanta Public School system. We talk to Anthony about how he and his students are working together to create a trauma-informed, healing-centric classroom.
    More about our guest: Anthony Downer teaches Africana Studies, social studies, and civics at Frederick Douglass High School in the Atlanta Public School system. He attended public schools in Gwinett County, Georgia, attained a BA in Political Science at the University of Chicago and a Master's of Art in Teaching in social studies education at Georgia State University.
    Anthony is a co-founder and vice president of Georgia Educators for Equity and Justice, the founder and Vice President of the Liberation Learning Lab, and the host of his podcast “Wat Dat Wednesday: Conversations on Education and Liberation” on Educational Entities. Find it on Youtube and Instagram Live: @thenawfstar. 

    • 1 hr 9 min
    Structures of Solidarity: Undergraduate Student Workers Unite!

    Structures of Solidarity: Undergraduate Student Workers Unite!

    The common workplace issues of low pay, toxic environment, understaffing, corporate greed, wage theft, union busting, and high turnover also exist in institutions of higher education. Undergraduate students typically earn low wages at campus jobs. In this podcast we explore the concept that students are workers, due just wages and benefits and voice. Beginning in 2016, undergraduate students at Grinnell College in Iowa have worked to form the first union of undergraduate student workers, the Union of Grinnell Student Dining Workers (UGSDW). Union leaders, senior Keir Hichens and sophomore Malcolm Galpern Levin, are with us to give us the history of the movement, along with details of their organizing strategies. The union’s description is as “the only independent undergraduate labor union in the country, UGSDW fights for fair pay and benefits for workers at UGSDW.” Keir and Malcolm describe the context, the organizing process, the setbacks, the networks and coalitions, the victories, and the future expansion of the union. Students at Grinnell are discovering what collective power can do. As they work for transparency and accountability from their supervisors and the administration, they also address issues of food insecurity on campus. Keir and Malcolm provide insights on the value of undergraduate labor organizing to their own lives, to campus culture, and to the labor movement broadly.

    • 1 hr 19 min
    Work the Contradictions! On Institutional Power and Minority Difference

    Work the Contradictions! On Institutional Power and Minority Difference

    What happens to grassroots movements when they get access to normative power? How does one resist capture? What traditions, theories, and cautionary tales should we reference?
    Professor and critic Roderick Ferguson, author of We Demand: The University and Student Protests, among many other works on social movements and the politics of institutional dissent, joins us to discuss these themes, and much more, in our May 2022 episode.
    This interview is for all who know that tough moral or political bind: between intellection and administration; between creative risk and bureaucratic necessity; between holding a radical critique of power and resisting cooptation in everyday life.
    Credits
    Music by Aviva and the Flying Penguins, Paul Myhrie, Aliyah Harris, and Akrasis (aka Mark McKee + Max Bowen)
    Logo design by Emily Vinick
    Co-hosted and co-produced by Tina Pippin and Lucia Hulsether

    • 1 hr 8 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
24 Ratings

24 Ratings

lrh103 ,

a gem of teaching podcasts

This podcast is invaluable for educators looking to grow in the field of radical pedagogy and to build their social justice knowledge. It covers a range of issues in education (for example, grading, labor unions, theater pedagogy, abolition, environmental, writing and literacy programs) with a general focus on showing examples of teaching in democratic partnership with students and for social justice goals. I think it is special that the hosts met several years ago when one of them was a college freshman and she enrolled in a class the other host was teaching. Fast forward to now and they are both college faculty

Gloabeyta ,

Abeyta

Great podcasr

MCADM ,

I love Tina and Lucia!

They are a great team, and they help me think more clearly about my own teaching. I would like to go back to college to take a class with them!

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