100 episodes

We discuss the great books, the great ideas and the process of liberal education.

Online Great Books Podcast Online Great Books Podcast

    • Arts
    • 4.8 • 279 Ratings

We discuss the great books, the great ideas and the process of liberal education.

    #136- Maritain’s Art and Scholasticism, with Thomas Mirus (Catholic Culture Podcasts) Part 2

    #136- Maritain’s Art and Scholasticism, with Thomas Mirus (Catholic Culture Podcasts) Part 2

    Scott and Karl are joined by special guest Thomas Mirus, Director of Podcasts for CatholicCulture.org, to finish their discussion of Jacques Maritain’s Art and Scholasticism. 
    What does contemplating beautiful art do for the soul? Mirus says that if you have metaphysics going into your art, "It's going to make you aware of what art is leading you to and also where art is coming from." 
    The trio also talks about how great art causes an emotional response but its object is not to do that. Scott adds, "If you are yanking everyone's emotional chain, you are not exactly creating art."
    Tune in for Part Two of their discussion, brought to you by onlinegreatbooks.com. 

    • 1 hr 21 min
    #135- Maritain’s Art and Scholasticism, with Thomas Mirus (Catholic Culture Podcasts) Part 1

    #135- Maritain’s Art and Scholasticism, with Thomas Mirus (Catholic Culture Podcasts) Part 1

    This week, Scott and Karl are joined by special guest Thomas Mirus, Director of Podcasts for CatholicCulture.org, to discuss Jacques Maritain’s Art and Scholasticism. 
    Maritain argues for an objective view of both art and the artist, bringing an orderly, scholastic, Thomistic approach to understanding aesthetics. Mirus says, "Maritain gets art better than any other philosopher who came before him in the Western Tradition."
    For Maritain, art is “a virtue of the practical intellect that aims at making." The virtue or habitus of art, Maritain writes, is not simply an “interior growth of spontaneous life”, but has an intellectual character and involves cultivation and practice.
    The trio also talks about how fine arts and practical arts have been cloven off. How can we hold them both in esteem without denigrating the other? 
    Scott says, "If we really know what art is then we will be more connected to honest work— that will be a refuge from this intellectual confusion, this metaphysical disgustingness, around us." 
    Tune in for Part One of their discussion, brought to you by onlinegreatbooks.com. 

    • 1 hr 9 min
    #134- Nietzsche on Resentment: The Genealogy of Morals Part 2

    #134- Nietzsche on Resentment: The Genealogy of Morals Part 2

    Scott and Karl finish their discussion of “Good and Evil, Good and Bad,” the first essay from Friedrich Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals. 
    Nietzsche demonstrates that the Christian world is steeped in false piety and infected with slave morality. Slave morality is based on resentment over the beauty, wisdom, power, and glory of the master class of people. 
    Nietzsche regards this resentment as the greatest weakness of our time. As for resentment politics, Scott says, "It only works if you live in a society that is ruled by that morality."
    Tune in to hear more of the duo’s discussion on noble morality vs slave morality. Brought to you by onlinegreatbooks.com.

    • 51 min
    #133- Nietzsche on Resentment: The Genealogy of Morals Part 1

    #133- Nietzsche on Resentment: The Genealogy of Morals Part 1

    This week, Scott and Karl begin their discussion of “Good and Evil, Good and Bad,” the first essay from Friedrich Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morals. 
    This essay questions the value of our moral concepts and examines their evolution. Karl says, "Evil is not the same as bad. Once you figure that out, the rest of the essay is easier for you."
    Nietzche believes the inversion of values develops out of the resentment of the powerful by the weak. He writes, "The revolt of the slaves in morals begins in the very principle of resentment becoming creative and giving birth to values."
    Have the concepts of good and evil actually been of value to the human race? "Once you figure out the origins [of these terms] you can ask the question of their value," Karl adds. 
    Tune in for the first part of the duo's discussion. Brought to you by onlinegreatbooks.com. 

    • 1 hr 8 min
    #132- Plato's Greater and Lesser Hippias Part 2

    #132- Plato's Greater and Lesser Hippias Part 2

    What is a lie? What does it take to be a good liar?
    This week, Scott and Karl finish their discussion of one of Plato’s earlier Socratic dialogues, Greater Hippias and Lesser Hippias. 
    These two dialogues make you ask all the questions to figure out what is fine, what makes a good person, and whether the liar is better than the non-liar. Karl says, "The problem that this dialogue is pointing out is that there’s something wrong with looking at goodness as simply power or capability."
    By the end of the show, Karl attests that if you haven’t read your Plato, you might not be a critical thinker. Tune in and join the conversation at onlinegreatbooks.com. 

    • 52 min
    #131- Plato's Greater and Lesser Hippias Part 1

    #131- Plato's Greater and Lesser Hippias Part 1

    Scott and Karl discuss one of Plato’s earlier Socratic dialogues, Greater Hippias and Lesser Hippias. 
    The dialogues are named after Hippias of Elis, an eminent sophist and contemporary of Plato. 
    What is a sophist? According to Scott, “A sophist is someone who says what he needs to say in order to teach you something so that he can take money from you.”
    These dialogues show Socrates at work on topics related to the Greek word καλόν, translating to fine, noble, or beautiful. Scott says, “Plato is the best writer ever. Socrates is the best teacher ever. And they are dealing with all the best, most difficult problems ever." 
    Tune in for a fascinating discussion on sophistry and what it means when something is “fine." Brought to you by onlinegreatbooks.com. 

    • 1 hr 10 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
279 Ratings

279 Ratings

Tlinscomb 8922 ,

My life is probably ruined

I started listening to this podcast about a year ago. I’ve been listening to the back catalogue and current releases and reading the books before the podcasts when I can. It made me want to try the classic western books and conquer the feeling of intimidation they had for me. Already I have seen the lack of quality and frankly, effort in many modern books (especially popular Christian devotional and study books that I read with our church home groups). My wife told me the other day that I “never used to complain about them before you started listening to that dang podcast!” Well I guess my life is ruined now.… and I’m glad. Thank you guys!

DRBHOTEL ,

I’m a fan.

I have wanted to read the great books for years. Started the program and OGB six months ago and love it. Bonus surprise: Discovering the podcast. I really enjoy the discussion, tangents, and even Scott’s rants. I have learned a ton, and enjoy hearing the guys wrestle with the texts.

druthernot ,

Five Stars!

I have been involved with Online Great Books for almost a year. In that time I have read Homer, Greek tragedies and comedies, and some Plato.
This is one of the most fulfilling activities I have ever done—not easy; sometimes maddenly difficult.
Scott’s and Karl’s podcasts are interesting and enlightening. A review by them invariably means another tome on my own ‘infinity pile’.
I wish a podcast and reading program like this could have been around years ago, but Internet availability has made it possible.

Top Podcasts In Arts

You Might Also Like