224 episodes

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews, recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas. In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners on a musical journey with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

Ozark Highlands Radio Ozark Folk Center State Park

    • Music
    • 4.9 • 42 Ratings

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews, recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas. In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners on a musical journey with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

    OHR Presents: Steam Machine

    OHR Presents: Steam Machine

    This week, authentic Minneapolis old time bluegrass string band Steam Machine recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park. Also, an interview with the bands founders AJ Srubas and Rina Rossi. Joining AJ and Rina in this performance are David Robinson on banjo and Andrew Deia on upright bass.

    “Steam Machine is a midwest based old time/bluegrass music project fronted by award winning in-demand Minneapolis fiddler AJ Srubas and Twin Cities old time music & dance instigator Rina Rossi on guitar. A spectacular shortlist of stellar musicians perform with the band on banjo and bass, and when possible, mandolin.

    “Originally formed in Minneapolis in 2017, Steam Machine brought to the national stage a midwest influenced string band aesthetic that didn’t draw such hard lines between bluegrass and old time music. Smooth powerful fiddling, driving three finger banjo, front-of-the-beat rhythm backup combined into a “suspiciously entertaining” sound.

    “Two time Appalachian String Band Music Festival (Clifftop) Traditional Band Contest ribbon winners and Folk Alliance Midwest Official Showcase Artists, since 2018 they have been touring the region and the country performing at diverse venues from roots music hubs to bluegrass and Americana festivals, and teaching workshops at traditional music epicenters across the country from the Augusta Heritage Center (WV) to Festival of American Fiddle Tunes (WA) with many others in between. At home in Minneapolis, they are heavily involved as organizers in many of the local community old time and bluegrass institutions.

    “While not purists, Steam Machine does listen closely to the “old stuff” and strives to capture the essence of what makes these tunes and songs special, as they hear it. The project continues to be an evolving vehicle for playing music they love and honoring the brilliance left behind by old time heroes like Lyman Enloe, Cyril Stinnett and more. Equally at home playing for an oldtime/bluegrass loving crowd or listeners new to these sounds, Steam Machine aspires to keep midwest style old time bluegrass music alive and well wherever they go.” - https://www.steammachinemusic.com/what-we-do

    In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, OHR producer Jeff Glover offers a 1981 archival recording of Ozark original Bob Olivera performing the classic cowboy song “Tumbling Tumbleweeds” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

    In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater sleuths out the origin of the folk song “The World is Old.”

    • 59 min
    OHR Presents: Seamus Egan

    OHR Presents: Seamus Egan

    This week, traditional Irish musician, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Seamus Egan recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park. Also, an interview with Seamus.

    “It’s hard to think of an artist in traditional Irish music more influential than Seamus Egan. From his beginnings as a teen prodigy, to his groundbreaking solo work with Shanachie Records, to his founding of Irish-American powerhouse band Solas, to his current work as one of the leading composers and interpreters of the tradition, Egan has inspired multiple generations of musicians and helped define the sound of Irish music today. As a multi-instrumentalist, he’s put his mark on the sound of the Irish flute, tenor banjo, guitar, mandolin, tin whistle, and low whistle, among others. As a composer, he was behind the soundtrack for the award-winning film The Brothers McMullen, co-wrote Sarah McLachlan’s breakout hit, ‘Weep Not for the Memories,’ and has scored numerous documentaries and indie films since. As a bandleader, Solas has been the pre-eminent Irish-American band of their generation for the past 20 years, continuously renewing Irish music with fresh ideas, including a collaboration with Rhiannon Giddens on their 2015 album. As a performer, few others can make so many instruments or such wickedly complex ornaments seem so effortless.” - https://seamuseganproject.com/about

    Seamus is joined in this performance by Owen Marshall.  “Vogue magazine calls musician Owen Marshall ‘A guitar/mandolin/banjo player rivaled in character only by the occasional three-pronged carrot’ (Vogue 2009). With the music traditions of Quebec and Nova Scotia just over the border from his home in Vermont and the strong Irish musical scene of Boston to the south, Owen was immersed in the various textures and sounds of the Celtic music from an early age. In addition to touring with acts such as The Press Gang, Copley Street, Haas, Marshall, Walsh, and dance band Riptide, Owen is in demand at music camps throughout New England and the U.S., where he shares his approach to accompanying traditional music.” - www.owenmarshallmusic.com

    In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, OHR producer Jeff Glover offers a 1981 archival recording of Ozark originals Bob & Melissa Atchison performing the traditional tune “Miss Miranda” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

    In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater explores shape note singing and the haunting “Abolitionists Hymn.”

    • 59 min
    OHR Presents: Ben Haguewood

    OHR Presents: Ben Haguewood

    This week, hammered dulcimer prodigy, singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and Ozark original Ben Haguewood recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park. Also, an interview with this upstart hammer wielding dulcimer master.

    Ben Haguewood is an Ozark original hailing from the tiny hamlet of Potosi, Missouri near the heart of the Mark Twain National Forest. Although a relative newcomer to the competitive world of hammered dulcimer playing, Ben has left his mark on the art form both as a player and a composer. Since becoming a regular Ozark Folk Center performer as a teen, he’s voraciously absorbed all the traditional folk music he could and collected many friends along the way. Ben has been in more than a few bands over the years but his partnership with champion old-time fiddler Kailee Spickes stands out as most enduring. The duo make up two fifths of the band “Taller Than You” and all of the band “Blackberry Summer.” Possessing a seemingly inexhaustible desire to create, both separately and together, Ben and Kailee have explored multiple instruments, musical styles, and even songwriting. From rousing traditional jigs to delicate original ballads, you’ll enjoy this journey through the music of Ben Haguewood.

    In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, OHR producer Jeff Glover offers a 2022 archival recording of Ozark original and dulcimer instructor to Ben Haguewood, Janice Huff, performing her original tune “Back of the Moon” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

    In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater examines nonsensical lyrics in traditional songs.

    • 59 min
    OHR Presents: Playlist One

    OHR Presents: Playlist One

    This week, a retrospective of the very first season of Ozark Highlands Radio featuring a variety of outstanding performances recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park. Host Dave Smith and OHR producer Jeff Glover provide context and commentary for this captivating collection.

    Each year at the Ozark Folk Center State Park, we record many hours of live music. We cherish all of it, but some of these performances stand out as being uniquely interesting or moving. On this episode, OHR producer Jeff Glover guides us through some of the most memorable moments of season one. Featured on this show are: thumb picking guitar Jedi and country music legacy Thom Bresh; OHR guest host, writer, and renowned folk musician Aubrey Atwater; singer-songwriter Wil Maring with award winning guitarist Robert Bowlin; OHR host and our very own Dave Smith; Ozark originals The Lazy Goat String Band; Missouri folk sensations and Ozark originals Cindy Woolf & Mark Bilyeu; Outlaw Country star Malcolm Holcomb with multi-instrumentalist Jared Tyler; Ozark originals The Clark Family; world champion mountain dulcimer master Jeff Hames; writer, auto harpist and singer Bryan Bowers; and Ozark original husband and wife duo Lukas & Eden Pool.

    In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, OHR host Dave Smith offers a 1975 archival recording of Ozark original musician, educator, country music legacy, and the original keeper of “the vault,” Mark Jones, performing the traditional tune “Arkansas Traveler” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

    In his segment “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins presents a profile of renowned Ozark original folk singer Almeda Riddle, the voice of the Ozarks.

    • 59 min
    OHR Presents: Railyard Live - Chucky Waggs & the Company of Raggs

    OHR Presents: Railyard Live - Chucky Waggs & the Company of Raggs

    This week, another special road trip episode. OHR visits Rogers, Arkansas’ Railyard Live Concert Series featuring Ozark original true folk troubadours Chucky Waggs & The Company of Raggs, recorded live at Butterfield Stage in Railyard Park in historic downtown Rogers.

    Rogers, Arkansas’ Railyard Live Concert Series began in 2021. Held on the city’s Butterfield Stage next to Railyard Park in historic downtown Rogers, it features live concerts every weekend throughout the Spring, Summer, and Fall. All of the Railyard Live events are either free to the public or at very low cost of admission. The concert series features a wide array of musical styles and interests designed to appeal to the diverse population of Rogers and invite them to experience the newly revitalized Railyard Entertainment District. The Ozark Folk Center State Park and the City of Rogers, Arkansas partnered to bring Ozark Highlands Radio to capture a little slice of this modern Ozark culture.

    Chucky Waggs is a multi-instrumentalist, singer/songwriter and recording artist based out of the hills of Eureka Springs, AR. Chucky Waggs plays a mix of acoustic and electric guitar, 5 string and tenor banjo, dobro, resonator guitar, harmonica, musical saw and kazoo, while using his feet to stomp out the back beat on a thrown together drum kit during live performances. Drawing influences from early American roots music, as well as early punk and rock and roll, he's often joined on stage by numerous accompanying musicians during live performances to add to the energy and dynamic of his original material. This group is commonly referred to as the "Company of Raggs.” The result ranges from intimate, often humorous, folk ballads, to all out rowdy stomp alongs.
- https://chuckywaggs.com/bio

    In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, OHR producer Jeff Glover offers a 1981 archival recording of Ozark original Dave Para performing the traditional song “Frankie and Albert” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

    In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater presents a collection of coal mining disaster songs.

    • 59 min
    OHR Presents: Railyard Live - Arkansauce

    OHR Presents: Railyard Live - Arkansauce

    This week, another special road trip episode. OHR visits Rogers, Arkansas’ Railyard Live Concert Series featuring post-folk newgrass phenomenon Arkansauce, recorded live at Butterfield Stage in Railyard Park in historic downtown Rogers. Also, an interview with Rogers Arts & Culture Coordinator Kinya Christian.

    Rogers, Arkansas’ Railyard Live Concert Series began in 2021. Held on the city’s Butterfield Stage next to Railyard Park in historic downtown Rogers, it features live concerts every weekend throughout the Spring, Summer, and Fall. All of the Railyard Live events are either free to the public or at very low cost of admission. The concert series features a wide array of musical styles and interests designed to appeal to the diverse population of Rogers and invite them to experience the newly revitalized Railyard Entertainment District. The Ozark Folk Center State Park and the City of Rogers, Arkansas partnered to bring Ozark Highlands Radio to capture a little slice of this modern Ozark culture.

    “Arkansauce is Tom Andersen on bass, Zac Archuleta on guitar, Ethan Bush on mandolin, and Adams Collins on banjo. Their music features improvisational string leads matched with complex melodies, intriguing rhythms, and deep thumping bass grooves. Each member sings lead and harmony parts as well as contributes to the lyrics, which offer authentic, intelligent songwriting with hard-hitting hooks. “We are a band that spends most of our time in the back of a van hurtling toward long nights, good times, and a destiny unknown,” says Ethan. “Our inspiration is gathered by events unfolding in our own adventures in real time. These days, the desire to create, inspire, and redefine within our scene seems to be the main driving force behind our music.” The melodies of the Ozark Mountains' rolling hills and raging rivers can be heard in this progressive string quartet’s distinct blend of newgrass.”
    https://www.arkansaucemusic.com/info

    In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, OHR producer Jeff Glover offers a 1981 archival recording of Ozark originals The Bill Sky Family Trio performing the traditional song “Twilight is Stealing” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

    In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater traces the peregrination of the tune “John Stenson’s No. 2.”

    • 59 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
42 Ratings

42 Ratings

jdlorenzo8 ,

Entertaining

Wow ... I discovered this podcast last year when I was searching for podcasts involving David Holt.
The library of past shows is wonderful and I greatly anticipate each new broadcast. I greatly enjoy traditional country, bluegrass and folk music and this podcast offers all of those forms with great intelligence and humor. I enjoy learning about the artists who are featured, most of whom I was unaware of previously. I hope Ozark Highlands Radio continues to broadcast for many years to come. It truly enriches my life and makes a difficult, stressful urban commute to work much more enjoyable. Thanks for producing it and keeping it fresh and engaging each week! May God grant you many years!

PS … I was glad to see you finally produced a program honoring Mark Jones. His segment was always a highlight of each program. I especially liked the Christmas program you did a few years ago and how involved he was in it and his use of “distilled water” in his eggnog. LOL

color pencil cliff ,

Great show!!!!

I LOVE this show!!!

Snarkclaw ,

Great Performances of American Folk Music

I love Ozark Highlands Radio! This podcast has taught me a lot about American folk music, including a fun multi-part segment from 2017 attempting to define folk music. It has been fascinating to learn American history through music, including the reason for different instruments and sound. There is a lot of great music to be enjoyed on this podcast and a lot of interesting stories to be heard. :-)

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