144 episodes

A weekly discussion of immigration policy matters, both immediate and long-term, with researchers from the Center for Immigration Studies and guests.The Center for Immigration Studies is an independent, non-partisan, non-profit, research organization. Since our founding in 1985 by Otis Graham Jr., we have pursued a single mission – providing immigration policymakers, the academic community, news media, and concerned citizens with reliable information about the social, economic, environmental, security, and fiscal consequences of legal and illegal immigration into the United States.

Parsing Immigration Policy Center for Immigration Studies

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    • 4.2 • 31 Ratings

A weekly discussion of immigration policy matters, both immediate and long-term, with researchers from the Center for Immigration Studies and guests.The Center for Immigration Studies is an independent, non-partisan, non-profit, research organization. Since our founding in 1985 by Otis Graham Jr., we have pursued a single mission – providing immigration policymakers, the academic community, news media, and concerned citizens with reliable information about the social, economic, environmental, security, and fiscal consequences of legal and illegal immigration into the United States.

    Report: Can U.S. Farm Workers Be Replaced by Machines?

    Report: Can U.S. Farm Workers Be Replaced by Machines?

    A Center for Immigration Studies report and companion podcast episode, “Can U.S. Farm Workers be Replaced by Machines? Mechanizing Fruit and Vegetable Production,” provide historical context as well as analysis of current challenges and prospects for farm labor and mechanization. Both the report and the discussion explain the options available to replace U.S. farm workers - machines, H-2A guestworkers, and imports.

    The report outlines how rising labor costs have historically driven the adoption of mechanization in agriculture. It traces the evolution of farm mechanization, from the end of the Bracero program in the 1960s to the present day, highlighting pivotal moments such as the enactment of the Immigration and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA). IRCA supporters promised that legalized farm workers would demand higher wages, and that farm employers would have to raise wages and improve working conditions to retain legalized workers or hire H-2A guestworkers. But this did not happen, partly due to massive fraud.

    Philip Martin, professor emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California at Davis and author of the report, discusses how once legalized the workers left the fields for other employment and were replaced by new illegal workers. Since the passing of IRCA, which legalized more than one million illegal farm workers, the debate over the pay and work conditions of those in the fields and the role of mechanization has persisted.

    Martin emphasizes the pivotal role of government policies in impacting the growth of mechanization through labor-saving research, the cost of farm workers, and imports. The Farm Workforce Modernization Act (FWMA), approved by the U.S. House in March 2021 and re-introduced in July 2023, is the most recent legislation debated and repeats the IRCA bargain – legalization of illegal farmworkers for easier access to H-2A guestworkers.

    There is a race between labor-saving machines and migrant H-2A workers playing out amidst rising imports. Higher labor costs accelerate investments in machines to replace workers and spur government and private efforts to develop new farming systems, biological and engineering breakthroughs, and supply chain adjustments to accelerate labor-saving mechanization.Martin stresses, “Research, migration, and trade policies will help to determine whether workers or machines pick U.S. apples and oranges in 2030.”

    In his closing commentary, Mark Krikorian, the Center’s executive director and podcast host, highlights President Biden’s false claim that he does not have the authority to control the border and action from Congress is required. Political vulnerability is now forcing him to control the massive numbers entering the country.

    Host

    Mark Krikorian is the Executive Director of the Center for Immigration Studies.

    Guest

    Philip Martin is Professor Emeritus of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California at Davis.

    Related

    Can U.S. Farm Workers Be Replaced By Machines?

    Bracero 2.0: Mexican Workers in North American Agriculture

    Biden’s New Border Plan Shows ‘I Can’t Do Anything’ Was Always A Lie

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    • 37 min
    The Democrats’ Immigration Evolution

    The Democrats’ Immigration Evolution

    On this week’s episode of Parsing Immigration Policy, we are joined by Ruy Teixeira, co-author with John Judis of last fall’s book, Where Have All the Democrats Gone?: The Soul of the Party in the Age of Extremes. Teixeira, currently a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, worked from 2003 to 2022 as a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, a left-leaning public policy research and advocacy organization.

    Teixeira explains that Democrats were not always proponents of the open-border agenda. The Democratic party used to see illegal immigration as a threat to low-wage workers and unions. In fact, in the 1980s, organized labor was the main group pushing for more hawkish immigration policies.

    Teixeira stresses the importance of including the people at the center of the American electorate in policy debates, stating that the Democratic leadership is way off where the public is not. Many issues have become “culturalized” and reflect the agenda of what he calls a “shadow party” that includes activist groups, donors, academics, et al. who view issues, especially immigration, through a good-versus-evil lens, which does not foster productive debate or compromise.

    Today, he said, Democrats refuse to even acknowledge a problem at our southern border and have generally alienated the working class, which once made up a significant part of their base. Additionally, they often categorize their opponents as evil rather than merely mistaken. Teixeira sums up the view of the Democratic “shadow party” on immigration as “more is better and less is racist.”

    In his closing commentary, Mark Krikorian shares what he saw on a recent trip to the Del Rio and Eagle Pass areas of Texas, which has been “Ground Zero” for the border crisis. However, almost overnight the illegal immigration flow has virtually stopped in this area, thanks to a Mexican army crackdown on illegal migrants that followed December visits to Mexico by President Biden and other senior officials.

    Host

    Mark Krikorian is the Executive Director of the Center for Immigration Studies.

    Guest

    Ruy Teixeira is a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.

    Related

    Ruy Teixeira AEI profile

    Could Immigration Hand the 2024 Election to Trump?

    Where Have All the Democrats Gone?: The Soul of the Party in the Age of Extremes

    How Biden Could Act on the Border and Help Himself in November

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    • 42 min
    Senate Border Bill Update

    Senate Border Bill Update

    The Senate bill that would provide billions of dollars’ worth of funding to Ukraine in exchange for increased border security measures is unlikely to pass into law, but certain provisions from the bill may make their way into future border legislation. Andrew Arthur, the Center for Immigration Studies’ Resident Fellow in Law and Policy and former counsel for the House Judiciary and Oversight Committees, joins Parsing Immigration Policy to discuss the border bill with our host and executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies, Mark Krikorian.

    Arthur provides background on the bill and explains what changes would be implemented if it became law, including a 5,000 per-day cap on illegal entries, after which the border would be briefly closed to other migrants. In essence, Democratic efforts to promote this bill are little more than an attempt to limit the damage to President Biden’s political prospects resulting from increasing focus on the chaos at the border in an election year. The bill also includes provisions that have nothing to do with border security – including an increase in family- and employment-based green cards and automatic work permits for relatives of certain temporary workers.

    Regardless, Arthur explains, the president does not need legislative action to enforce the border, and the administration’s support of this bill is an admission of the failures of its current policies. The proposed cap of 5,000 illegal entries per day shows that Biden can close the border to illegal aliens at any time – he just doesn’t want to.

    Host

    Mark Krikorian is the Executive Director of the Center for Immigration Studies.

    Guest

    Andrew Arthur is the Resident Fellow in Law and Policy at the Center for Immigration Studies.

    Related

    The Good — and a Lot of Bad — in the Senate Border ‘Deal

    ’Latest Immigration Bill Spends $1.29 billion on Ineffective ATD Program

    The Availability of Work Authorization Is a Known ‘Pull Factor’ for Illegal Immigration and the Submission of Fraudulent Asylum Claims

    The Border Bill is Terrible

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    Intro Montage

    Voices in the opening montage:Sen. Barack Obama at a 2005 press conference.Sen....

    • 37 min
    European Lessons for America’s Mass Migration Crisis

    European Lessons for America’s Mass Migration Crisis

    This Week's episode of the Parsing Immigration Podcast offers key findings from a European field-research trip by Todd Bensman, the Center’s national security fellow. Bensman was a visiting fellow at the Budapest-based Migration Research Institute, and examined borders in Hungary, Slovenia, Poland, Croatia, Bosnia, Serbia, Kosovo, North Macedonia, and Greece.

    Bensman’s research revealed a resurgence of illegal human traffic along the “Western Balkan Route”, reminiscent of the 2015-2016 crisis. The 380,000 migrant detections in Europe during 2023 are merely suggestive of much larger undetected flows indicated by the nearly one million asylum claims also filed during that year. The trip also revealed the intense political debates among the European Union’s 27 members as they consider how to handle the rising challenge. Unfortunately, these debates have received little attention in the United States, where a U.S. border crisis is now entering its fourth year featuring many similar dynamics and policy factors.

    Conversely, Europe could learn from the U.S. experience. For example, the New Pact on Migration and Asylum, approved in December by EU members and the European Parliament, but not yet ratified, includes a regulation which would allow in all illegal-alien family units and unaccompanied minors almost without exception. This is the current policy in the U.S. under the Biden administration, and it has resulted in a strong pull factor attracting migrants to the southern border.

    Host

    Mark Krikorian is the Executive Director of the Center for Immigration Studies.

    Guests

    Todd Bensman is the Senior National Security Fellow at the Center for Immigration Studies.

    Related

    Video: European Lessons for America’s Mass Migration Crisis

    Are Borders Back in Europe?

    Will Mass Migration Breach Poland’s Famous Border Fence?

    The Road from Damascus: Time to recall the bloody history of border crossings from Syria

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    Intro Montage

    Voices in the opening montage:Sen. Barack Obama at a 2005 press conference.Sen. John McCain in a 2010 election ad.President Lyndon Johnson, upon signing the 1965 Immigration Act.Booker T. Washington, reading in 1908 from his 1895 Atlanta Exposition speech.Laraine Newman as...

    • 34 min
    Panel Podcast: Asylum in the U.S. and Europe

    Panel Podcast: Asylum in the U.S. and Europe

    The Center for Immigration Studies hosted a panel discussion examining present asylum laws in the United States and in Europe, how they work, their impact on illegal immigration, and proposals for reform. Members of the newly formed International Network for Immigration Research (INIR), which includes like-minded think tanks in the U.S., Israel, Hungary, France, and the UK, discussed how their countries are navigating their current asylum crises and address the shared challenge of immigration control.

    Participants examined whether the post-WWII asylum regime is an anachronism that needs to be re-thought and the proposed asylum reforms being discussed in the current negotiations between Republicans and Democrats. Listen to hear about the European Union Migration and Asylum Pact and what the U.S. can learn from this newly passed agreement.

    Mark Krikorian, the Center’s executive director and host of Parsing Immigration Policy, moderates this rebroadcast of the Center's panel.

    Host

    Mark Krikorian is the Executive Director of the Center for Immigration Studies.

    Guests

    Viktor Marsai is the Director of the Budapest-based Migration Research Institute

    Nicolas Pouvreau-Monti is the Co-founder of the Immigration and Demography Observatory in France

    Eric Ruark is the Director of Research at NumbersUSA

    Related

    Panel Video

    Panel Transcript

    Viktor Marsai's PowerPoint Presentation

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    Intro Montage

    Voices in the opening montage:Sen. Barack Obama at a 2005 press conference.Sen. John McCain in a 2010 election ad.President Lyndon Johnson, upon signing the 1965 Immigration Act.Booker T. Washington, reading in 1908 from his 1895 Atlanta Exposition speech.Laraine Newman as a "Conehead" on SNL in 1977.Hillary Clinton in a 2003 radio interview.Cesar Chavez in a 1974 interview.House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaking to reporters in 2019.Prof. George Borjas in a 2016 C-SPAN appearance.Sen. Jeff Sessions in 2008 comments on the Senate floor.Charlton Heston in "Planet of the Apes".

    • 49 min
    How States Can Fight Human Trafficking

    How States Can Fight Human Trafficking

    As January marks Human Trafficking Prevention Month, the Center for Immigration Studies releases a second podcast interview focused on the subject. This week’s episode of Parsing Immigration Policy features Frank Russo, director of the CPAC Foundation’s Center for Combatting Human Trafficking, who joins our guest host, Jessica Vaughan, director of Policy Studies at the Center for Immigration Studies. The two experts discuss the challenges, initiatives, and policy considerations involved in combatting this issue.

    Russo brings extensive experience in drafting and passing public safety and criminal justice legislation to his current position, which focuses on assisting states in updating their human trafficking laws. He emphasizes that even though 90 percent of crime in the U.S. is handled at the state and local level, there exists a significant gap in state law when it come to a comprehensive criminal and civil code to specifically address human trafficking. Russo explains that local jurisdictions often resort to charging traffickers with offenses like kidnapping or false imprisonment, lacking a targeted approach to combat human trafficking itself.

    Another challenge in the battle against human trafficking lies in the fragmented focus of victim advocacy organizations, state and local jurisdictions, and federal prosecutors. Each entity concentrates on different aspects of human trafficking, resulting in a lack of collaboration and a failure to understand the factors that drive the trafficking of individuals to the U.S.

    Russo offers recommendations for how the state and local levels can better fight human trafficking. One key suggestion is to provide resources to individuals who can prove they were trafficked and will testify against their traffickers, such as placing them in a safehouse to ensure their protection. Another is to adopt certain language in state law that can hold employers responsible for labor trafficking occurring in their facilities or through their use of contractors.

    Russo spoke at last month’s 2nd annual Conference to Combat Human Trafficking, co-sponsored by the Center for Immigration Studies and the University of Houston’s Borders, Trade, and Immigration Institute.

    Host

    Jessica Vaughan is the Director of Policy Studies at the Center for Immigration Studies.

    Guest

    Frank Russo is the Director of the CPAC Foundation Center for Combatting Human Trafficking.

    Related

    Florida Grand Jury: Biden Putting Alien Children in Harm’s Way

    The Biden Border Crisis: Exploitation of Unaccompanied Alien Children

    Florida Grand Jury Issues Shocking Report on Alien Kids

    Register for the 3rd Annual Conference to Combat Human Trafficking: Research and Technology, July 22-24, 2024

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    • 36 min

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
31 Ratings

31 Ratings

realbbbb ,

Enjoyable although some episodes I skip

I generally enjoy the podcast even though I'm usually up to date on most of the topics featured on it. There are definitely some topics that I'm not interested in and end up skipping (esp some of the panel discussions they replay). I also would suggest some type of listener Q&A segment every so often. Otherwise, Mark does a great job.

carboncow ,

Very much has an agenda

Another white nationalist group masquerading as a think tank. You’ll get numbers and information here don’t be fooled this group has an agenda do your research and start with Wikipedia to find out when the key players are in their organization.

retarmy1995 ,

Very informative

I find the discussions on various aspects on immegration to be very informative and well thoughtout. Highly recommend this podcast to anyone who wants very accurate facts and to become better informed on this important subject.

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