75 episodes

PEM Currents is a evidence-based podcast focused on the care of ill and injured children in the Emergency Department. The host is Brad Sobolewski, author of PEMBlog.com and an Associate Professor of Pediatric Emergency Medicine at Cincinnati Children's and the University of Cincinnati.

PEM Currents: The Pediatric Emergency Medicine Podcast Brad Sobolewski

    • Medicine
    • 4.6 • 48 Ratings

PEM Currents is a evidence-based podcast focused on the care of ill and injured children in the Emergency Department. The host is Brad Sobolewski, author of PEMBlog.com and an Associate Professor of Pediatric Emergency Medicine at Cincinnati Children's and the University of Cincinnati.

    Toxicology Season 1 Episode 4: Salicylates

    Toxicology Season 1 Episode 4: Salicylates

    This is episode four of season one of the Toxicology series that Suzan Mazor, the Medical Director for Toxicology at Seattle Children’s, and I are putting together. This episode focuses on a worrisome intentional and accidental ingestion – salicylates. Learn about diagnosis, management, and more!







    I am now proud to offer CME through Cincinnati Children’s. To claim CME & ABP MOC Part 2, visit Cincinnati Children’s Online Courses and search ‘PEM Currents’.







    PEMBlog.com







    Follow me on Twitter @PEMTweets







    Check out the Facebook page







    References







    Toce, Burns. The Poisoned Pediatric Patient. Pediatrics in Review May 2017, 38 (5) 207-220; DOI: 10.1542/pir.2016-0130







    Calello, Henretig. Pediatric Toxicology: Specialized Approach to the Poisoned Child. Emerg Med Clin N Am 32 (2014) 29–52







    Barrueto et al. Updates in the General Approach to the Pediatric Poisoned Patient. Pediatric Clinics. VOLUME 60, ISSUE 5, P1203-1220, OCTOBER 01, 2013. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2013.06.002







    Palmer, Clegg. Salicylate Toxicity. N Engl J Med 2020; 382:2544-2555. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMra2010852.

    • 14 min
    Toxicology Season 1 Episode 3: Acetaminophen

    Toxicology Season 1 Episode 3: Acetaminophen

    This is episode three of season one of the Toxicology series that Suzan Mazor, the Medical Director for Toxicology at Seattle Children’s, and I are putting together. This episode focuses on one of the most common intentional ingestions – Acetaminophen.







    For those of you from across the ocean – this episode tackles paracetamol, and for you chemists out there, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol (APAP).







    Suzan reviews toxicity and management and perhaps this one will help you care for an upcoming patient, and get a couple of questions right on your boards.







    I am now proud to offer CME through Cincinnati Children’s. To claim CME & ABP MOC Part 2, visit Cincinnati Children’s Online Courses and search ‘PEM Currents’.







    PEMBlog.com







    Follow me on Twitter @PEMTweets







    Check out the Facebook page







    References







    Toce, Burns. The Poisoned Pediatric Patient. Pediatrics in Review May 2017, 38 (5) 207-220; DOI: 10.1542/pir.2016-0130







    Calello, Henretig. Pediatric Toxicology: Specialized Approach to the Poisoned Child. Emerg Med Clin N Am 32 (2014) 29–52







    Barrueto et al. Updates in the General Approach to the Pediatric Poisoned Patient. Pediatric Clinics. VOLUME 60, ISSUE 5, P1203-1220, OCTOBER 01, 2013. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2013.06.002

    • 13 min
    Toxicology Season 1 Episode 2: Decontamination and Elimination

    Toxicology Season 1 Episode 2: Decontamination and Elimination

    This is episode 2 of season one of the Toxicology series that Suzan Mazor, the Medical Director for Toxicology at Seattle Children’s, and I are putting together. This follow up episode focuses on a decontamination and elimination in the poisoned pediatric patient and offers many pearls that will serve as a foundation for upcoming episodes – including why Ipecac is no longer prescribed to every 4 month old!







    I am now proud to offer CME through Cincinnati Children’s. To claim CME & ABP MOC Part 2, visit Cincinnati Children’s Online Courses and search ‘PEM Currents’.







    Follow me on Twitter @PEMTweets







    Check out the Facebook page







    References







    Toce, Burns. The Poisoned Pediatric Patient. Pediatrics in Review May 2017, 38 (5) 207-220; DOI: 10.1542/pir.2016-0130







    Calello, Henretig. Pediatric Toxicology: Specialized Approach to the Poisoned Child. Emerg Med Clin N Am 32 (2014) 29–52







    Barrueto et al. Updates in the General Approach to the Pediatric Poisoned Patient. Pediatric Clinics. VOLUME 60, ISSUE 5, P1203-1220, OCTOBER 01, 2013. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2013.06.002

    • 12 min
    Toxicology Season 1 Episode 1: General approach to the poisoned patient

    Toxicology Season 1 Episode 1: General approach to the poisoned patient

    This is episode 1 of season one of the Toxicology series that Suzan Mazor, the Medical Director for Toxicology at Seattle Children’s, and I are putting together. This premiere episode focuses on a solid general approach to the poisoned pediatric patient and offers many pearls that will serve as a foundation for upcoming episodes.







    I am now proud to offer CME through Cincinnati Children’s. To claim CME & ABP MOC Part 2, visit Cincinnati Children’s Online Courses and search ‘PEM Currents’.







    Follow me on Twitter @PEMTweets







    Check out the Facebook page







    References







    Osterhoudt KC, Burns Ewald M, Shannon M, Henretig FM. Toxicologic emergencies. In: Textbook of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, 5th ed, Fleisher GR, Ludwig S, Henretig FM (Eds), Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia 2000. p.951.







    Toce et al. The poisoned pediatric patient. Pediatrics in Review May 2017, 38 (5) 207-220; DOI: https://doi.org/10.1542/pir.2016-0130

    • 17 min
    Mastoiditis

    Mastoiditis

    Does mastoiditis always present with the classic triad of swelling behind the ear, otalgia, and protrusion of the auricle? Do you need to get a CT to make the diagnosis? What is the exact relationship with acute otitis media? Can swimmer’s ear turn into mastoiditis? These questions and more are why I recorded this episode of PEM Currents: The Pediatric Emergency Medicine Podcast.







    PEMBlog.com







    @PEMTweets on Twitter







    The Facebook page







    References







    Geva et al. Conservative management of acute mastoiditis in children. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2008;72(5):629.







    Groth et al. Acute mastoiditis in children aged 0-16 years–a national study of 678 cases in Sweden comparing different age groups. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2012;76(10):1494.







    Leskinen et al. Complications of acute otitis media in children. Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2005;5(4):308.







    Thompson et al. Effect of antibiotics for otitis media on mastoiditis in children: a retrospective cohort study using the United kingdom general practice research database. Pediatrics. 2009;123(2):424.







    van den Aardweg  et al. A systematic review of diagnostic criteria for acute mastoiditis in children. Otol Neurotol. 2008;29(6):751. 

    • 15 min
    Delirium

    Delirium

    Yes, PEM Currents is a Pediatric Emergency Medicine podcast, but during the COVID-19 pandemic we may be tasked with seeing patients outside of our area of expertise. Plus, there’s a lot we can learn from big people that we can extrapolate to children. I have partnered with POPCoRN, the Pediatric Overflow Planning Contingency Response Network to deliver content that will benefit those of us who may have been asked to care for adults both in their native habitat, and in our pediatric facilities. This episode, brought to you by yours truly and Barrett Burger, a Medicine-Pediatrics Resident from the University of Arkansas focuses on delirium and confusional states and delivers some sound advice on how to address the confused patient. Though this is geared towards the care of adults there are some great pearls to help with patients of any age.







    PEMBlog.com







    @PEMTweets on Twitter







    The Facebook page







    References







    Things We Do for No Reason: Neuroimaging for Hospitalized Patients with Delirium. J. Hosp. Med. 2019 July;14(7):441-444. March 20, 2019. | DOI 10.12788/jhm.3167







    Inouye SK. The dilemma of delirium: clinical and research controversies regarding diagnosis and evaluation of delirium in hospitalized elderly medical patients. Am J Med 1994; 97:278.







    Inouye S, Westendorp R, Saczynski J. Delirium in elderly people. Lancet. 2014;383(9920):911-922.







    Marcantonio. Delirium in Hospitalized Older Adults, NEJM, 2017.







    Setters B, Solberg LM. Delirium. Prim Care 2017; 44:541.







    Shenvi. Assessing and Managing Delirium and Older Adults. Academic Life in Emergency Medicine. July 25, 2015. http://www.aliem.com/delirium-in-older-adults/. Accessed June 7, 2020.

    • 15 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
48 Ratings

48 Ratings

Kool Aid 1621 ,

Fantastic podcast

Great balance of important information in scientific manner as well as key points to remember to assess patients quickly and efficiently. One of best Peds podcasts out there!

Dan939393 ,

Fantastic

Thankful for this service! As a peds resident, this podcast is invaluable. Thanks Brad!

Arnold430 ,

Awesome

This podcast is amazing. Very educational and easy to listen to!

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