298 episodes

Our near daily podcasts move quickly to reflect current events, are inspired by real patient care, and speak to the true nature of what it’s like to work in the Emergency Room or Pre-Hospital Setting. Each medical minute is recorded in a real emergency department, by the emergency physician or clinical pharmacist on duty – the ER is our studio and everything is live.

Emergency Medical Minute Emergency Medical Minute

    • Medicine
    • 4.7, 101 Ratings

Our near daily podcasts move quickly to reflect current events, are inspired by real patient care, and speak to the true nature of what it’s like to work in the Emergency Room or Pre-Hospital Setting. Each medical minute is recorded in a real emergency department, by the emergency physician or clinical pharmacist on duty – the ER is our studio and everything is live.

    Podcast 584:  Ketamine for Depression and Suicidality 

    Podcast 584:  Ketamine for Depression and Suicidality 

    Contributor: Jared Scott, MD
    Educational Pearls:
    Suicide is currently the 10th leading cause of death in the US  Low quality studies have reported ketamine as a potential promising agent in treating depression and preventing suicidal ideations or thoughts Randomized study was performed looking at giving ketamine to depressed patients in the ED to see if they could establish a proof of concept, meaning: would looking at ketamine for treatment of acute depression or suicidality be viable? 18 suicidal patients who required hospitalization for their depression and suicidality were entered in the study. 88% of the group treated with ketamine felt like their symptoms improved for up to 3 days, while only 33% of the placebo group reported an improvement References
    Domany Y, Shelton RC, McCullumsmith CB. Ketamine for acute suicidal ideation. An emergency department intervention: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, proof-of-concept trial. Depression & Anxiety (1091-4269). 2020;37(3):224-233. doi:10.1002/da.22975.
     
    Summarized by Jackson Roos, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD

    • 3 min
    Podcast 583:  Raise Your Hands if You Have Carpal Tunnel Syndrome   

    Podcast 583:  Raise Your Hands if You Have Carpal Tunnel Syndrome   

    Contributor: Aaron Lessen, MD
    Educational Pearls:
    Hand raising test: a simple but effective tool to diagnose carpal tunnel  Patients hold their hands over their head and if symptoms of carpal tunnel develop within 2 minutes, it is considered positive, meaning they likely have carpel tunnel Symptom included numbness and dull pain in the distribution of the median nerve Treatment for carpal tunnel in the ED can include splinting in a neutral position and oral steroids with possible follow up for steroid injections or surgery References
    Padua L, Coraci D, Erra C, et al. Carpal tunnel syndrome: clinical features, diagnosis, and management. Lancet Neurol. 2016;15(12):1273-1284. doi:10.1016/S1474-4422(16)30231-9
    Ma H, Kim I. The diagnostic assessment of hand elevation test in carpal tunnel syndrome. J Korean Neurosurg Soc. 2012;52(5):472-475. doi:10.3340/jkns.2012.52.5.472
    Summarized by Jackson Roos, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD

    • 2 min
    Rapid Fire Pharmacy Review with Adis Keric of ER-Rx

    Rapid Fire Pharmacy Review with Adis Keric of ER-Rx

    Meet Adis Keric, Board Certified Pharmacotherapy Specialist and a Board Certified Critical Care pharmacist who works in the Emergency Department and ICU of level 1 trauma center Regions Hospital in Saint Paul, MN. Adis is the founder and host of a new FOAMed podcast, ER-Rx. He started the podcast to inform clinicians in the ED and ICU about up-to-date, appropriate and optimal use of medications in different clinical scenarios.
    Dr. Nick Tsipis sits down with Adis to discuss some pearls in Emergency Medicine Pharmacy. 
    Time Stamps:
    0:10 Intros
    4:35 Antibiotics
    8:30 Post-Intubation Sedation
    12:00 Anti-coagulation reversal*
    16:00 ER-Rx Plug
    *Correction to figures quoted on anticoagulation reversal pricing. High-dose Andexxa regimen maxes out around $60,000 and Kcentra maxes out at $6,000. So there is still a massive price difference, but not as high as quoted in the audio.
     
    Check out ER-Rx on iTunes, Google Podcasts, Spotify, YouTube and other major podcast hosting platforms!
    Instagram: @errxpodcast
    Website: http://errxpodcast.com/

    • 18 min
    Podcast 582: Gadolinium - The Contrast of MRI

    Podcast 582: Gadolinium - The Contrast of MRI

    Contributor: Michael Hunt, MD
    Educational Pearls:
    Contrast agents are commonly used for X-rays and CT’s to better characterize disease, but contrast doesn’t work with MRI. That’s where the element Gadolinium comes into play. Gadolinium, element 64, is ferromagnetic (attracted to iron) below 68 degrees and above that temperature it’s paramagnetic which makes it useful in MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging). Gadolinium is toxic alone, but when paired with chelators it can be used in humans and allows for better characterization of tumors or abnormal tissue on MRI. It helps identify this abnormal tissue because when MRI causes polarization of our body’s cells, the gadolinium, which has the maximum number of unpaired electrons in its orbital shells, alters the rate of decay in abnormal tissue highlighting abnormalities on imaging. Gadolinium can also be used in the treatment of cancers because it collects in the cells of abnormal tissue, allowing for more targeted therapies. In people exposed to gadolinium, the anaphylaxis rate is low, below 1/1000, and in rare cases there are reports of kidney injury and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis which is why it’s not recommended in renal failure patients. References
    1)Ibrahim MA, Hazhirkarzar B, Dublin AB. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Gadolinium. [Updated 2020 Mar 9]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2020 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK482487/
    2)Pasquini L, Napolitano A, Visconti E, et al. Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agent-Related Toxicities [published correction appears in CNS Drugs. 2018 May 15;:]. CNS Drugs. 2018;32(3):229-240. doi:10.1007/s40263-018-0500-1
     
    Summarized by Jackson Roos, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD

    • 4 min
    Podcast 581:  Alcohol Complications

    Podcast 581:  Alcohol Complications

    \Contributor: Don Stader, MD
    Educational Pearls:
    Altered mental status/confusion are major symptoms associated with both alcohol use and withdrawal. Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a triad of symptoms of confusion, internuclear ophthalmoplegia, and confabulation The treatment for Wernicke’s is IV thiamine or vitamin B1 Untreated Wernicke’s leads to Korsakoff's syndrome where a prolonged thiamine deficiency leads to worsening brain function  Subdural hematomas from torn bridging veins are common in alcoholics because of the combination of frequent falls and cerebral atrophy caused by alcohol. Alcohol is a major cause of heart failure and atrial fibrillation; “holiday heart” is a-fib induced by binge drinking where high levels of acetaldehyde from the metabolism of alcohol excite the heart. Frequent alcohol use is linked to esophageal cancer Alcoholic cirrhosis can lead to a multitude of complications including esophageal varices that can rupture often with fatal outcomes Aspiration pneumonia is more common in alcoholics because of a depressed gag reflex and alteration of oral flora  References
    Brousse G, Geneste-Saelens J, Cabe J, Cottencin O. Alcool et urgences [Alcohol and emergencies]. Presse Med. 2018;47(7-8 Pt 1):667-676. doi:10.1016/j.lpm.2018.06.001
    Chandrakumar A, Bhardwaj A, 't Jong GW. Review of thiamine deficiency disorders: Wernicke encephalopathy and Korsakoff psychosis. J Basic Clin Physiol Pharmacol. 2018;30(2):153-162. Published 2018 Oct 2. doi:10.1515/jbcpp-2018-0075
    Simou E, Britton J, Leonardi-Bee J. Alcohol and the risk of pneumonia: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ Open. 2018;8(8):e022344. Published 2018 Aug 22. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2018-022344
     
    Summarized by Jackson Roos, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD

    • 6 min
    On The Streets #6: Artificial Intelligence Detection for LVOs

    On The Streets #6: Artificial Intelligence Detection for LVOs

    Meet Michelle Whaley, Clinical Nurse Specialist and Stroke Program Coordinator at Sky Ridge Medical Center in Lone Tree, Colorado. Jordan and Michelle discuss advances in Artificial Intelligence technology in an app that uses algorithms to analyze CT Angiograms to alert physicians of patients with images concerning for Large Vessel Occlusions (LVOs). Listen as they discuss the sweeping implications of this technology in the realm of stroke care and how it is decreasing wait times for critical patients to receive tPA and interventional procedures.
     
    For EMS, this technology is already improving the care given by specialized transfer teams of patients from smaller hospitals to regional stroke centers. Tune in for other applications of this technology in pre-hospital settings on the horizon.
     
    Disclaimer: This episode of On The Streets is for educational purposes only. Emergency Medical Minute is not affiliated with VIZ AI in any way and did not receive compensation for this episode.

    • 21 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
101 Ratings

101 Ratings

Canuck eh? ,

Exactly what I’m looking for

I am loving your podcast! Short, succinct pearls of wisdom that help my practice in the ER, but don’t take a lot of time to listen to. Thanks for keeping your podcasts short and to the point. I’ve learned a lot and am going through your older ones now.

MikeHarper23 ,

PreMed who loves the Emergency Medical Minute

I am a premed at UAB and have been listening to the Minute since my senior year of high school. I wanted to say thank you for what y’all do. You have made my medical education so much more entertaining, and I have gotten to share this knowledge with a lot of my classmates (who also enjoy it). Thank you again, and keep up the good work!

besthiker1 ,

Great podcast

The podcast is extremely good in relaying the latest medical treatments. It is evidenced based and they also consider limitations and biases of studies. It is also to the point. I highly recommend it!

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