804 episodes

Our near daily podcasts move quickly to reflect current events, are inspired by real patient care, and speak to the true nature of what it’s like to work in the Emergency Room or Pre-Hospital Setting. Each medical minute is recorded in a real emergency department, by the emergency physician or clinical pharmacist on duty – the ER is our studio and everything is live.

Emergency Medical Minute Emergency Medical Minute

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.7 • 142 Ratings

Our near daily podcasts move quickly to reflect current events, are inspired by real patient care, and speak to the true nature of what it’s like to work in the Emergency Room or Pre-Hospital Setting. Each medical minute is recorded in a real emergency department, by the emergency physician or clinical pharmacist on duty – the ER is our studio and everything is live.

    Podcast 683: Zofran vs. Haldol for Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome

    Podcast 683: Zofran vs. Haldol for Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome

    Contributor:  Jared Scott, MD
    Educational Pearls:
    Around 30 patients with cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (CHS) randomized treatment in three arms with 8mg Zofran, Haldol 0.05 mg/kg, and Haldol 0.1 mg/kg Haldol arms performed better on all measures compared to Zofran Extrapyramidal symptoms were significantly higher in the Haldol group than Zofran, especially the high-dose Haldol group References
    Ruberto AJ, Sivilotti MLA, Forrester S, Hall AK, Crawford FM, Day AG. Intravenous Haloperidol Versus Ondansetron for Cannabis Hyperemesis Syndrome (HaVOC): A Randomized, Controlled Trial. Ann Emerg Med. 2021;77(6):613-619. doi:10.1016/j.annemergmed.2020.08.021
    Summarized by John Spartz, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD
     
    The Emergency Medical Minute is excited to announce that we are now offering AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ via online course modules. To access these and for more information, visit our website at www.emergencymedicalminute.com/cme-courses/ and create an account. 
    Donate to EMM today!

    • 5 min
    Podcast 682: Snake Bites

    Podcast 682: Snake Bites

    Contributor:  Gretchen Hinson, MD
    Educational Pearls:
    Pit vipers include cottonmouths, rattlesnakes, and copperheads All have folding long fangs, triangular face, and elliptical pupils About 5,000 snakebites per year reported to Poison Control Initially develop a local reaction (swelling, bruising, pain, bullae) Complications can include  25% of snake bites result in no envenomation (dry bites) 20% of bites have serious side-effects, which can include hematologic, cardiovascular, neurologic and, muscular abnormalities, or even anaphylaxis to the envenomation itself Minor symptoms should be observed for 12-24 hours Moderate to severe symptoms are typically treated with antivenom  CroFab and other antivenoms are expensive, with costs upwards of $3200 per vial wholesale, though newer agents are cheaper Treat with 4-6 vials of CroFab initially with moderate symptoms and subsequent redosing with  References
    Buchanan JT, Thurman J. Crotalidae Envenomation. [Updated 2021 Jan 29]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan.
    Kanaan NC, Ray J, Stewart M, et al. Wilderness Medical Society Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Pitviper Envenomations in the United States and Canada. Wilderness Environ Med. 2015;26(4):472-487. doi:10.1016/j.wem.2015.05.007
    Summarized by John Spartz, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD
     
    The Emergency Medical Minute is excited to announce that we are now offering AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ via online course modules. To access these and for more information, visit our website at www.emergencymedicalminute.com/cme-courses/ and create an account. 
    Donate to EMM today!

    • 6 min
    Podcast 681: Internal Hernias

    Podcast 681: Internal Hernias

    Contributor:  Adam Barkin, MD
    Educational Pearls:
    Internal hernias, when bowel herniates through iatrogenic or congenital defect in mesentery, represent 1-6% of all small bowel obstructions Mortality of strangulated internal hernias is over 50% due to bowel necrosis and sepsis Intermittent symptoms presenting with nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, abdominal distension Increased risk in patients with gastric bypass, liver transplant, or laparascopic surgery CT is very >90% sensitivity and specific in diagnosing SBO due to internal hernia Mesenteric swirl is a classic radiology finding Treatment with immediate surgical consultation for possible OR bowel decompression Start on broad spectrum antibiotics with any signs of sepsis References
    Lanzetta MM, Masserelli A, Addeo G, et al. Internal hernias: a difficult diagnostic challenge. Review of CT signs and clinical findings. Acta Biomed. 2019;90(5-S):20-37. Published 2019 Apr 24. doi:10.23750/abm.v90i5-S.8344
    Martin LC, Merkle EM, Thompson WM. Review of internal hernias: radiographic and clinical findings. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2006;186(3):703-717. doi:10.2214/AJR.05.0644
    Summarized by John Spartz, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD
     
    The Emergency Medical Minute is excited to announce that we are now offering AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ via online course modules. To access these and for more information, visit our website at www.emergencymedicalminute.com/cme-courses/ and create an account. 
    Donate to EMM today!

    • 5 min
    Podcast 680: Coronary Artery Dissection

    Podcast 680: Coronary Artery Dissection

    Contributor:  Adam Barkin, MD
    Educational Pearls:
    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is the most common cause of acute MI in women under 50 years old Risk factors include fibromuscular dysplasia, extreme exercise, stress, pregnancy, and recent birth Diagnosed in cath lab but medically managed and usually do not get a stent Treated with dual antiplatelet therapy and beta-blockers References
    Yip A, Saw J. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection-A review. Cardiovasc Diagn Ther. 2015;5(1):37-48. doi:10.3978/j.issn.2223-3652.2015.01.08
    Janssen EBNJ, de Leeuw PW, Maas AHEM. Spontaneous coronary artery dissections and associated predisposing factors: a narrative review. Neth Heart J. 2019;27(5):246-251. doi:10.1007/s12471-019-1235-4
    Summarized by John Spartz, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD
     
    The Emergency Medical Minute is excited to announce that we are now offering AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ via online course modules. To access these and for more information, visit our website at www.emergencymedicalminute.com/cme-courses/ and create an account. 
    Donate to EMM today!

    • 4 min
    Podcast 679: Antibiotics for CAP

    Podcast 679: Antibiotics for CAP

    Contributor:  Peter Bakes, MD
    Educational Pearls:
    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is normally stratified into outpatient-candidates vs. inpatient candidates for treatment For outpatient treatment, antibiotic selection is driven by presence or absence comorbid health conditions (chronic lung/kidney/liver disease, DM, immunocompromised state, alcoholism, asplenia) No comorbidities: High dose amoxicillin, doxycycline, azithromycin Comorbidities: augmentin, cephalosporin, doxycycline, macrolide with fluoroquinolones as an alternatives For inpatient treatment, standard treatment is a macrolide and 3rd-generation cephalosporin Prior MRSA isolate or pseudomonas isolate as well as severe pneumonia are indications for adding MDR organism coverage with vancomycin and anti-pseudomonal coverage References
    Metlay JP, Waterer GW, Long AC, et al. Diagnosis and Treatment of Adults with Community-acquired Pneumonia. An Official Clinical Practice Guideline of the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Diseases Society of America. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2019;200(7):e45-e67. doi:10.1164/rccm.201908-1581ST
    Summarized by John Spartz, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD
     
    The Emergency Medical Minute is excited to announce that we are now offering AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ via online course modules. To access these and for more information, visit our website at www.emergencymedicalminute.com/cme-courses/ and create an account. 
    Donate to EMM today!

    • 7 min
    Podcast 678: ECMO for Refractory VFib

    Podcast 678: ECMO for Refractory VFib

    Contributor:  Aaron Lessen, MD
    Educational Pearls:
    Refractory ventricular fibrillation, defined as 3 defibrillation shocks without resolution, was studied via RCT looking to compare ECMO with cardiac cath vs. typical resuscitation After 30 patients (15 each arm), the trial was stopped because such a significant benefit seen in the ECMO arm 6 patients survived and 3 had good neurological outcomes at 6 months with ECMO This is compared to 1 patient surviving initially and none surviving at 6 months in the typical resuscitation arm References
    Yannopoulos D, Bartos J, Raveendran G, et al. Advanced reperfusion strategies for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and refractory ventricular fibrillation (ARREST): a phase 2, single centre, open-label, randomised controlled trial. Lancet. 2020;396(10265):1807-1816. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(20)32338-2
    Summarized by John Spartz, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD
     
    The Emergency Medical Minute is excited to announce that we are now offering AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ via online course modules. To access these and for more information, visit our website at www.emergencymedicalminute.com/cme-courses/ and create an account. 
    Donate to EMM today!

    • 3 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
142 Ratings

142 Ratings

kstonepharm ,

Pharmacy Friday

I love love love that you added a pharmacy Friday! I’m a first year pharmacy resident hoping to specialize in the ED and I love this! Very helpful and informative!

Canuck eh? ,

Exactly what I’m looking for

I am loving your podcast! Short, succinct pearls of wisdom that help my practice in the ER, but don’t take a lot of time to listen to. Thanks for keeping your podcasts short and to the point. I’ve learned a lot and am going through your older ones now.

MikeHarper23 ,

PreMed who loves the Emergency Medical Minute

I am a premed at UAB and have been listening to the Minute since my senior year of high school. I wanted to say thank you for what y’all do. You have made my medical education so much more entertaining, and I have gotten to share this knowledge with a lot of my classmates (who also enjoy it). Thank you again, and keep up the good work!

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