70 episodes

Have you ever wished for a comprehensive guide to help navigate those challenging and uncomfortable moments in parenting? We're Susan Stone and Kristina Supler—full-time moms and dedicated student attorneys at KJK. Our careers in student advocacy provide a unique perspective, but fundamentally, we're two moms sharing the wisdom gathered from our experiences at home and in the courtroom.

Our podcast delves into the essential aspects of parenting, covering a wide spectrum of topics. We dissect trends, examine case studies, and draw from expert opinions in each episode, aiming to equip you with insights on raising resilient kids in our constantly changing world.

Please join us as we delve into some 'Real Talk.'

Real Talk With Susan & Kristina KJK

    • Kids & Family
    • 5.0 • 22 Ratings

Have you ever wished for a comprehensive guide to help navigate those challenging and uncomfortable moments in parenting? We're Susan Stone and Kristina Supler—full-time moms and dedicated student attorneys at KJK. Our careers in student advocacy provide a unique perspective, but fundamentally, we're two moms sharing the wisdom gathered from our experiences at home and in the courtroom.

Our podcast delves into the essential aspects of parenting, covering a wide spectrum of topics. We dissect trends, examine case studies, and draw from expert opinions in each episode, aiming to equip you with insights on raising resilient kids in our constantly changing world.

Please join us as we delve into some 'Real Talk.'

    Real Talk: Navigating College Acceptance Season

    Real Talk: Navigating College Acceptance Season

    Welcome to this week's episode of Real Talk! In this installment, hosts Susan and Kristina delve into the high-stakes world of college admissions alongside guest Davida Amkraut. As the trio navigates the aftermath of a particularly competitive admissions season, they offer invaluable insights, tips, and tricks to help listeners make informed decisions. With the college acceptance landscape resembling a bloodbath this year, many students have found themselves admitted to schools that weren't necessarily their first choice. Parents, this episode is essential listening as the team breaks down what you need to know before sending your child off to college. And for upcoming seniors, they provide crucial advice on staying ahead of the curve and crafting a strategic plan for the college application process. Tune in for a candid discussion packed with insider knowledge and practical guidance!
     
    About Davida Amkraut:
    Davida is an Independent College Consultant who serves as the saving grace for students and families in crisis who are navigating the complex college application process. Whether a student finds themselves in trouble and is applying to college for the first time, or is transitioning from one university to another due to a Title IX or other university-related misconduct claim, Davida helps young adults shape their stories so that they gain acceptance into college.
      TRANSCRIPT: Susan Stone:
    Welcome back to Real Talk with Susan Stone and Kristina Supler. We are full time moms and attorneys bringing our student defense legal practice to life with real candid conversations.
     
    Susan Stone:
    Last week was accepted students weekend for Tori. Can you believe it? 
     
    Kristina Supler:
    what a big, big like- How do you feel now that you know where she's going?
     
    Susan Stone:
    Oh my gosh. First of all, for the listeners out there. My youngest just accepted college. She will be going to Ringling College in Sarasota, Florida, which is an art school.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Fabulous. 
     
    Susan Stone:
    To have it done for the final time was crazy. And our guest today, I also know has three kids, but I think all of them are out of college. Welcome back to Davida Amkraut . 
     
    Davida Amkraut:
    Thank you. Thank you. I actually have one still in college. He's just finishing his sophomore year, so. 
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Well, we're glad you're able to join us again.Our listeners probably remember you from some of your prior recordings with us and welcome back. 
     
    Davida Amkraut:
    It's good to see you guys. Yeah. 
     
    Susan Stone:
    Where is your youngest? Northeastern 
     
    Davida Amkraut:
    am I that's my middle. He's graduating in May from Northeastern. He's graduating in two weeks, and my youngest is at George Washington University. 
     
    Susan Stone:
    And how was his experience there? 
     
    Davida Amkraut:
    Loves loves loves loves it.He's in the pre physical therapy program there. So he's having 
    wow that's back. That's back to your that's your basic simpler. Yeah. Therapy. Yeah.
     
    Susan Stone:
    may be great for everyone out here. Christina's family's in 
     
    Kristina Supler:
    PT Bizz 
     
    Susan Stone:
    So, DeVita, you've got a lot of career changes lately. Why don't you catch our listeners up with what you're doing? 
     
    Davida Amkraut:
    Yeah, so I'm still doing.I still am running my own private practice where I assist. This past year, I had about 55 kids from all across the country, actually, who I worked with, on college admissions. But I also joined a high school team, in the Bronx, where I'm working at a Jewish high school in the Bronx, and I am on their college counseling team.
     
    So it's really fascinating for me to see both sides of the table. Right. So I'm working with kids from my computer, but then I'm also working with kids in person, and I've had a lot of access to admission officers, which has been amazing. I've been on advocacy calls for my students. For the listeners who don't

    • 33 min
    Real Talk: Cuddle Caution - Student's Guide to Consent & Boundaries

    Real Talk: Cuddle Caution - Student's Guide to Consent & Boundaries

    Students sometimes enjoy cuddling, but innocent acts can sometimes lead to serious Title IX cases. These situations are more common than you might expect. Join Susan and Kristina in this episode of Real Talk as they discuss common pitfalls, focusing on important aspects like communication, conversation, and consent. Tune in for essential insights, and be sure to share this information with your students.
      LINKS MENTIONED IN THE SHOW: https://studentdefense.kjk.com/
      TRANSCRIPT: Susan Stone:
    Welcome back to Real Talk with Susan Stone and Kristina Supler. We are full time moms and attorneys bringing our student defense legal practice to life with real candid conversations.
     
    Susan Stone:
    Nice to see you on this dreary, rainy day. 
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Indeed, it is. 
     
    Susan Stone:
    It is. Well, we're going to talk about something that's actually good to do on a rainy day. 
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Ooh, tell me more. What could that be? 
     
    Susan Stone:
    Cuddling. 
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Who doesn't love cuddling? 
     
    Susan Stone:
    My gosh. You know what? I'm mourning the fact that my youngest is about to go to college.
    And we talked about this on prior podcasts, but do you remember we used to have younger kids. But back in the day. 
     
    Kristina Supler:
    My kids love to CUDDLE Yeah, 
     
    Susan Stone:
    There's nothing like that. Cuddling up a little kid, especially on a rainy morning.
     
    Susan Stone:
    Couldn't agree more.
     
    Susan Stone:
    I love it. 
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Well, why are you talking about cuddling today, Susan? Do I go with this?
     
    Susan Stone:
    Well, we're going to get there because, as you know, nobody sees us and things until something goes wrong. And what is that saying? Everything's fine till somebody gets poked in the eye. Do you remember that thing? 
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Yes. 
     
    Susan Stone:
    Well, we're going to talk about cuddling going wrong. But first, let's just talk about why do we cuddle? I mean, I was doing a little research on cuddling and did you know that cuddling produces oxytocin and basically makes you feel good and safe?
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Well, that's interesting because I suppose and you know, you're the special ed wiz, if you will, is it could one argue that cuddling is kind of like a form of O.T. in a way, occupational therapy or stimulating you in some way? 
     
    Susan Stone:
    Well, we know it improves sleep. There are some studies out there that says it actually boosts the immune system and it, believe it or not, lowers blood pressure.
    That's crazy, isn't it? 
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Now that I didn't see that one coming, I'm just thinking about like some of our little kids and people with sensitivities to touch and touch can be a good thing. And also maybe something that can be triggering. 
     
    Susan Stone:
    Yeah, exactly. Well, I would say that in early childhood, cuddling definitely leads to attachment parenting. You really form bonds.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Well, that like when you first have your baby and they want to put the baby on your chest for the. What does that kangaroo care? What was it called?
     
    Susan Stone:
     I think it's kangaroo care. It's been a minute
     
    Kristina Supler:
    and they have had a baby. 
     
    Susan Stone:
    Yeah, but I think your point is well taken that some children actually are averse to touch, you know, like that feeling. But most people do. And a little simple hug or cuddle is wonderful for parents. And I'm a big fan of parents being physically affectionate with children. But.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    but there's always a but 
     
    Susan Stone:
    but we're not here to talk about parents snuggling their babies, 
     
    Kristina Supler:
    I think as part of our podcast. It's funny, every episode there's sort of a theme of, in reality, things that are nice. Most of the time innocent sure and then put them on a college campus and the title nine world. And of course, there's always room for things to

    • 19 min
    Real Talk: Exploring Who We Are, What We Do, and How We Came Together

    Real Talk: Exploring Who We Are, What We Do, and How We Came Together

    In this week's episode of 'Real Talk,' Susan and Kristina uncover the secret to their successful partnership. Join them for a hilarious exploration of their working relationship, their practice,and the valuable lessons learned during their nearly decade-long collaboration. So grab a cup of coffee and join them for a candid conversation about what makes their professional bond so special.
     
    LINKS MENTIONED IN THE SHOW: https://studentdefense.kjk.com/ 
    https://www.amazon.com/Yes-Your-Kid-Parents-Todays/dp/1637743807 
    https://www.instagram.com/stonesupler/   TRANSCRIPT: Susan Stone:
    Welcome back to Real Talk with Susan Stone and Kristina Supler. We are full time moms and attorneys bringing our student defense legal practice to life with real candid conversations.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Susan ever since the Super Bowl.
     
    Susan Stone:
    Oh no, oh no. Don't say it.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    I have a secret guilty pleasure. I confess to you and our listeners out there like,
     
    Susan Stone:
    Oh my God here, it's coming.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    But I am totally, completely obsessed with the dunking Dunkin Donuts commercials, the Ben Affleck Matt Damon commercials. Did you see those during the Super Bowl?
     
    Susan Stone:
    Okay. Not only did I see them, but I saw us in Ben and Matt.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    That's what I thought.
     
    Susan Stone:
    I know.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    What is about those two. I was so drawn to it. I can't stop watching when they're there walking in. We got touchdown, Tommy. On the key.
     
    Susan Stone:
    You love that one.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    I love that one.
     
    Susan Stone:
    Touchdown Tommy on the keys. Okay, Because here's what it is. They've been together a long time working and kind of separating.Yeah. We're not childhood friends, but.
     
     Kristina Supler:
    No, we're not.
     
    Susan Stone:
     But it's been.
     
    Kristina Supler:
     It's been a minute.
     
    Susan Stone:
    It's been a second. Collaborating,
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Creativity
     
    Susan Stone:
    Creativity. And, you know, they drive each other crazy, which we do sometimes.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    We do. We do. But there's humor there. I can't even tell you how much it made me laugh when Matt Damon looks at Ben Affleck and he's like, how do you like them donuts?
     
    Susan Stone:
    Oh my God.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    I’m so sorry.
     
    Susan Stone:
    Okay. The line I loved is sometimes it's really hard to be your friend or remember, I would do anything for you. This is anything. And I know those moments because in our working relationship, in our friendship, we ask an absolute a lot from each other.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Oh yeah. It's it's really it's been it's been quite a journey we've been on for the past.
    I don't even know how long it's been.
     
    Susan Stone:
    for the listeners out there. And those of you who are in Greek organizations, I hard rushed Sue Blur to be my law partner. I remember saying, Join me in this practice. And you're like, Well, I still want my criminal defense and you still do.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    I still do. You do. I do.
     
    Susan Stone:
    But mostly we represent students out there and we do handle a lot of criminal defense and we deal do with that. We still deal with sex issues
     
    Kristina Supler:
    all day, every day.
     
    Susan Stone:
     It was a hard sell getting you in, but we made it and it's been actually almost ten years.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    So why are we talking about this today? Why what is the point of this episode of this topic?
    Are our listeners are like what we're gone from done kings and Matt Damon and Ben Affleck to to the two of you are
     
    Susan Stone:
    Dunking’s or dukin?
     
    Kristina Supler:
     it's done Kings Kings because they're kings I swear folks she’s  really smart
     
    Susan Stone:
    I just feel like what Dunkin Donuts like
     
    Kristina Supler:
     Yeah it is but in the commercial they were getting creative. Okay okay,.

    • 17 min
    Real Talk: How Can Parents Address Bullying?

    Real Talk: How Can Parents Address Bullying?

    In this week's episode of 'Real Talk,' Susan and Kristina dive deep into the topic of bullying. Discovering that your child is either being bullied or is the one doing the bullying can be incredibly challenging for parents. However, it's crucial to be informed. Join us in this episode to learn about the necessary steps you should take, the responsibilities schools have, and how you, as a parent, can ensure your child is protected. Tune in for valuable insights and practical advice.
    LINKS MENTIONED IN THE SHOW: https://studentdefense.kjk.com/
    https://www.instagram.com/stonesupler/ 
    TRANSCRIPT: Susan Stone: 
    Welcome back to Real Talk with Susan Stone and Kristina Supler. We are full time moms and attorneys bringing our student defense legal practice to life with real candid conversations.
     
    Susan Stone:
    Well, good morning. 
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Good morning, my friend. 
     
    Susan Stone:
    Gosh, I don't know about you, but I'm exhausted. I’m just so tired. Every bone in my body feels tired. 
     
    Kristina Supler:
    It's funny you say that, because this morning, for the first time in an unknown eternity, my alarm went off to go to the gym, and I chose not to get up. I went back to bed and then another hour and a half to sleep.
     
    Susan Stone:
    I've had a lot of those mornings and I'm wondering what's contributing to the exhaustion. Any ideas on your part? I just think it's we're really busy. 
     
    Kristina Supler:
    We've had a busy January. We've had a lot of hearings. We have a lot of tough cases that I think we both really care about. And, you know, our work is it's not work that you can do if you don't care. You know, I mean, what do you think? 
     
    Susan Stone:
    Yeah, You know, I try very hard and I know you do to to separate work from home because our family does. Yeah, but I take it home. I carry it in my heart. I carry every client in my heart. And it's hard. 
     
    Kristina Supler:
    It's hard to turn off your brain at night and stop thinking about these really significant issues that, you know, we've spent hours all day sorting through. But then you go home and, you know, my children are younger, obviously, as you know, I'm in mom mode cooking dinner and helping with homework. And last night we were making cookies for a school presentation on Friday, and it was kind of like, my gosh, the last thing I want to do, but you have to do it.

     
    Susan Stone:
    You've got to do it. And I know that I worked last night after I made dinner and I just was losing patience for the client and it was more just fatigue on my part.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Yeah. 
     
    Susan Stone:
    So I need to recharge and so do you. What do you do to recharge? 
     
    Kristina Supler:
    that's a good question, because it can be a couple of different things.
    For me, sometimes it's just having a weekend that's unscheduled, you know, not having a million activities, but then also sleep and exercise and just sort of having some time for myself and not feeling like I'm running around all weekend, you know, taking care of other people. But I mean, what about you? 
     
    Susan Stone:
    Yeah, I don't know. I, I don't know.
    I keep thinking about it. It's a moving needle. But one of the things I do know is that we do let work move into our home space, and it keeps me up in the middle of the night. So I got to get better at that. And if any of you listeners are out there and have some ideas and yes, I already do practice yoga and healthy.
     
    Kristina Supler:
     mindfulness, 
     
    Susan Stone:
    I've got that mindfulness.But you know what's been coming in a lot and I just thought we talk about it. We're getting a lot of calls about bullying again.
     
    Kristina Supler:
     We are. And we get those cases and those calls, I should say, all the time. I mean, every year. But I do feel like in January there's always a bit of an uptick in bullying, say, issues.
    And it's really for students of all ages, wouldn't you agree? 
     
    Susan Stone:
    Yeah.

    • 22 min
    Real Talk: Decoding Teen Slang

    Real Talk: Decoding Teen Slang

    In this week's episode of 'Real Talk,' Susan and Kristina take on the daunting task of deciphering the ever-changing slang of today's kids. From navigating linguistic rollercoasters to tackling new words and phrases that pop up daily, they show that staying in the know is not just essential but also a fun challenge. Join them for some laughs and linguistic acrobatics as they take on today’s latest trends.
    TRANSCRIPT: Susan Stone:
    Welcome back to Real Talk with Susan Stone and Kristina Supler. We are full-time moms and attorneys bringing our student defense legal practice to life with real candid conversations.
    Have a fun podcast today, Supler.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    What are we talking about?
     
    Susan Stone:
    We are going to talk about decoding teen slang and trends.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Oooo, fun, I like it.
     
    Susan Stone:
    Yeah. Before we launch into our podcast today, can I just say it is so flipping cold out.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Oh my gosh. It is freezing out. To our listeners out there, We are in Cleveland where it's a balmy four degrees or one degree, depending upon the device you look at, and it is just frigid.
     
    Susan Stone:
    Okay, So hubby last night noted that there are no terms for cold and it's been called an ‘arctic blast’. You ever thought that we were experiencing… 
     
    Kristina Supler:
    I feel like I've heard like local weather people use different iterations of Arctic blast. Arctic freeze. I don't know.
     
    Susan Stone:
    All I know is I was trying to walk the dogs yesterday and it was truly a miserable experience for me and the dogs. They didn't even want to go out and go to the bathroom. It was awful.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Funny, I had the same experience this morning when I took my two dogs out. It was like quick rush, take your business and get back inside. But even inside, Freezing. Freezing, freezing, freezing.
     
    Susan Stone:
    Yeah, and didn’t you have… What happened with your uh… was it your, was it your water heater? Your power? What happened this weekend?
     
    Kristina Supler:
     So, Cleveland got a big storm over the weekend and yeah, I didn't have power for 24 hours so I was, we were away. It's fortunate that we were away but it was a little nerve racking in terms of, I don't know, bad things happening in the house. Fortunately, my husband informed me that power has no impact on our heating system because we have steam.
    I didn't really know. Yes, but yeah, food in the fridge, all those fun issues that Midwesterners deal with, so on and so forth. But here we are today and hopefully we've got something light and funny that can warm things up.
     
    Susan Stone:
    Yeah. You know what we did yesterday? I took my youngest and we went and saw Mean Girls.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Oh I read about the like re- uh, relaunch of that movie. I’ve never seen it. Tell me about it.
     
    Susan Stone:
    Well, I love the original. And the original was amazing. Rachel McAdams, Lindsay Lohan,
     
    Kristina Supler:
    I was gonna say isn’t Lindsay Lohan in it. That's. Yeah, the two comes to mind.
     
    Susan Stone:
    Yeah. And that was one of her. And she's in the remake.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    How’s she looking these days?
     
    Susan Stone:
    She's looking gorgeous.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Really, good! Good.
     
    Susan Stone:
    Shout out to you, Lindsay. You are aging fine. But I will say, Tori, my 18 year old, did not like the movie at all.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Really? Why? Now, did she had she seen the original or. No?
     
    Susan Stone:
     No, she had. She just thought.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    the remake was not hitting her right?
     
    Susan Stone:
    No. She thought it was insulting to her intelligence.
     
    Kristina Supler:
    Why is that?
     
    Susan Stone:
    Well, she felt like it didn't capture the original flavor of bullying.
    And she thought bullying is such an important topic that they sort of made fun of it and made light of it and made it seem ridiculo

    • 22 min
    Real Talk: Parenting Through Tough Conversations

    Real Talk: Parenting Through Tough Conversations

    Welcome to Real Talk with Susan and Kristina! In this episode, we’ll dive into the importance of addressing uncomfortable topics with your children. Join us as we explore why these difficult conversations are crucial for your child's well-being and navigating life's challenges. Gain practical tips on addressing sensitive subjects, fostering open communication, and dive into real-life situations drawn from our cases and personal experiences with our own children.
    LINKS MENTIONED IN THE SHOW:  https://studentdefense.kjk.com/  https://www.instagram.com/stonesupler/ https://www.amazon.com/Yes-Your-Kid-Parents-Todays/dp/1637743807 TRANSCRIPT: Susan Stone: Welcome back to Real Talk with Susan Stone and Kristina super. We are full time moms and attorneys bringing our student defense legal practice to life with real candid conversations.
     
    Susan Stone: Okay. This is Martin Luther King Day, and we're in our new studio. What do you think about our new digs? Miss Supluar. 
     
    Kristina Supler: I like it. Fix some adjustment. But I. I actually. I think it's nice. It's cozy. It's more intimate.
     
    Susan Stone: that is interesting. Well, hopefully not as interesting as our topic today, which is parenting through tough conversation. Anything recent you want to share from the old simpler house? 
     
    Kristina Supler: Funny you should ask. So recently we had a little tough conversation parenting moment in my household with my daughter and some Netflix content. Let me tell you, these these parent settings and these accounts, number one parent listeners out there, if you don't know how to do that and check for content and age-appropriate restrictions, please do so.
    Very important because if you don't, your child has unfettered access to everything, and I learned that on Netflix. If you don't put on like parental controls and kids are watching like they can access NC 17 material, there's some steamy stuff on there. 
     
    Susan Stone: You know what? I had no idea, but I want to know where to find that steamy material. (Laughing) Kidding 
     
    Kristina Supler: After a long day of work, Susan's going home and firing up the Netflix.
     
    Susan Stone:  But my kids are older, so I don’t have to worry about it.
     
    Kristina Supler: So, you can do that. That's right. That's right. But yes, there are these settings. Make sure you have you know, how they work, and they're turned on and fired up and good to go. But so, it was brought to my attention by, I'll just say, a family member 
     
    Susan Stone: a family member
     
    Kristina Supler: that said, hey, you might want to give an eye towards, you know, what your daughter's looking at. And I said, my gosh, thank you for telling me. Because I think it's important to not always say, my child would never do that. You have to sort of be open to the possibility of your kid doing anything. 
     
    Susan Stone: Well, Supler considering you are a coauthor on a book saying, yes, your kid, it would be slightly hypocritical if you didn't think your own kid could do something.
     
    Kristina Supler: Indeed, indeed. And to our listeners out there, check out. Yes, your kid available at all. Booksellers 
     
    Susan Stone: I did not mean for that to be a plug.
     
    Kristina Supler: no no.
     
    Susan Stone: But I was topical.
     
    Kristina Supler: I had to seize the moment. So at any rate, I said, Well, let me do some digging and you know, you like to call me investigators Suplar
     
    Susan Stone: Oh my gosh.For the listeners out there, nobody and I mean nobody can get to the bottom of different facts. Like my law partner Kristina Suplesr. So, what did you do? 
     
    Kristina Supler: Well, so I start doing a little a little digging just late light investigation. Let's say I call my husband and loop him in to what's before us. I get his thoughts.
    And I was like, you know, before before having that parent child moment, I want to get my own facts right so that I know. So I sort of like a little, I w

    • 23 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
22 Ratings

22 Ratings

aprilgru ,

Powerful women powerful content

This is a great podcast about raising our youth in this country through discussions between two women who are attorneys who are dealing with our children in the toughest moments in their lives and the experts they find to shed light on the problems. Moving, informative and even funny. I look forward to each new episode and you will too.

Carly Boyd ,

Great content!

This podcast is very interesting and informative on both the legal and personal aspects! I really enjoy the different perspectives and stories you tell, specifically the latest episode “Every Parents Nightmare.” It was great to hear from a parent!

Christine Croissant ,

Down to earth advice on important topics

Really interesting! Susan and Kristina cover need-to-know topics for parents of teenagers. Great listening while I’m on my runs.

Top Podcasts In Kids & Family

Calm Parenting Podcast
Kirk Martin
Greeking Out from National Geographic Kids
National Geographic Kids
Good Inside with Dr. Becky
Dr. Becky Kennedy
But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids
Vermont Public
Parenting & You With Dr. Shefali
Dr. Shefali / Maia Wisdom
Circle Round
WBUR