116 episodes

Rediscovering New York is a weekly show that showcases New York City’s extraordinary neighborhoods. Each week we focus on a particular neighborhood; we explore its history, its vibe, its feel and its energy, really what makes the neighborhood special.

Rediscovering New York Jeff Goodman

    • Education
    • 4.7 • 28 Ratings

Rediscovering New York is a weekly show that showcases New York City’s extraordinary neighborhoods. Each week we focus on a particular neighborhood; we explore its history, its vibe, its feel and its energy, really what makes the neighborhood special.

    Photography New York Style

    Photography New York Style

    On this week's show we will explore the great art of photography, through the lens of New York City.

    My guests are *David Campany* , Managing Director of Programs at the *International Center of Photography* ( https://www.icp.org/ ) in New York; and *Alex Harsley* , documentary photographer and Curator of the *4th Street Photo Gallery* ( http://www.the4thstreetphotogallery.com/alex-harsley.html ) in the East Village.

    Tune in for this fascinating conversation at *TalkRadio.nyc* ( http://talkradionyc.msnd26.com/tracking/lc/a8216538-a299-47b2-80ab-760ed8208260/8416f3e5-f312-4993-af72-2807431a7d4e/0e7563bd-e990-41c8-9e2a-dd276d28e0f2/ ) or watch the *Facebook Video by Clicking Here* ( https://fb.watch/5iu95kqWZv/ ).

    *Show Notes*
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    Segment 1

    The topic of photography is mentioned first. It is an artform that means a lot to the state of New York. Today’s guests are David Campany who is an author and the managing director of programs at International Center of Photography. In addition, Alex Harsley has joined who is a documentary photographer and Curator of the 4th Street Photo Gallery in the East Village. When David first came to America, it was in the late 1980’s. He is from England but loves the people and the light of New York. The city is so theatrical it seems to be asking to be photographed. David also mentions versatility and how one can walk just two blocks in New York and feel like they’re in a new place. He states how important it is for his program to build strong relationship with their surroundings and community He was able to open a gallery featuring hundreds of images

    Segment 2

    David is asked what attracted him to the ICP and he explains how it is a perfect fit for him. He enjoys the creative side to his work by taking a space that is given and presenting it in different ways. He also likes collaborating with others to produce a quality finished product. Next, he talks about how in a photography institution, everyone will have a variety of reactions towards an image. That is less likely to occur with painting and drawing. The ICP has a show running currently featuring the theme of life and how it just goes on. He says that it is very gentile and observational work. His staff works with the artist to coordinate the gallery.

    Segment 3

    The second half of the show will be with the guest Alex Harsley who has photographed a number of historic figures throughout the years. After being taught to be a farmer, he concluded that was not what he wanted to do and moved to New York. He first got into photography in 1957. He eventually got into photojournalism and got to see a different perspective on situations that others did not. Furthermore, he talks about how much he wanted to take photography in school because equipment was not very accessible for him. Most people only used cameras for capturing portraits and significant moments. His family had a camera but was not allowed to touch it. After he got his equipment he began capturing moments of his life, friends and environment.

    Segment 4

    Alex is asked about if racism was an issue while transitioning from North Carolina to New York in the 1950’s. He explains how there was some discrimination but the neighborhood he grew up in was a melting pot and nobody was racist. Alex first started the 4th Street Photo Gallery after observing what was occurring in Far Rockaway New York. He took some documentary shots which contributed to opening the gallery in 1974. Next, Alex confesses how it is the diversity and ability to dream of the East Village citizens that motivates him to continue doing work in that area.

    • 1 hr
    Fabulous Fordham, in The Bronx

    Fabulous Fordham, in The Bronx

    On this week’s show we will visit the fabulous Fordham section of the Bronx.

    My guests are Rediscovering New York regular *Justin Rivers* , Chief Experience Officer and Lead Tour Guide for *Untapped New York* ( https://untappedcities.com/ ) , and *Wilma Alonso* , Executive Director of the *Fordham Road Business Improvement District* ( https://fordhamroadbid.org/ ).



    Tune in for this fascinating conversation at  *TalkRadio.nyc* ( https://d38rqs2egh08o4.cloudfront.net/link_click/ixAVlj8Nji_bl0E2/e7f50fc5726ee42136486f2d8219b88e ) or watch the *Facebook Livestream by clicking here* ( https://fb.watch/59meT4bXIn/ ) *.*

    *Show Notes*
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    Segment 1

    To begin, Jeff introduces the topic of Fordham along with other great places in New York. Then Wilma Alonso and Marco Shalma are introduced. Both of them are not originally from the empire state but they have both made great contributions. Wilma started the Fordham Road Business Improvement District in 2005. She admits that it took 25 years to build a bid on Fordham Road. It took hard work but was made possible thanks to the supporters. Marco is currently working on something called a Radio Park that is a unique experience that is rooted from broadway performances. It is a drive in theater with a band that plays the soundtrack while dancers are also performing. It is currently located in Queens. In addition, Marco’s love for food and wanting more types of food to be attainable in The Bronx lead to him creating the Bronx Night Market which is located on Fordham.

    Segment 2

    Due to the pandemic, Marco and the Bronx Night Market have had to put some restrictions on themselves. In 2019, they had tens of thousands of people entering and leaving daily. They are known to welcome in anyone as a food marketplace but now they cannot to the same extent. Marco is looking forward to getting back to normalcy so he can resume serving the borough like how he used to. Wilma loves the vibrance of the people that live in Fordham. When speaking to them, it is interesting for her to hear their stories of places she is familiar with. It gives the two of them a connection to each other and their environment. Marco describes the community as super direct. He appreciates how the people always tell him how it is.

    Segment 3

    Justin Rivers is introduced to begin the second half. He is the Chief Experience Officer and Lead Tour Guide for Untapped New York. He is from New Jersey but went to school at Fordham New York. Fordham got its name because it was shallow and appeared as though it could forge a river. Eventually, Fordham Manner originates and an English man contributed to the name. Fordham was a village that was right outside of New York. It can sometimes get forgotten or lost because it became more of the Bronx. Furthermore, Edgar Allen Poe was a Bronx residence who always had money issues. His house was one of the first built on Fordham road. The home is still around today. It is described as a cute little cottage. There still remains some remnants of it including Fordham Plaza which was the village square and the Poe house. There is also some Revolutionary War history in the area. George Washington was running from the British through Fordham and people gave him coverage.

    Segment 4

    Now that we are coming out of the pandemic, tours are now being offered again. Justin is a tour guide for untapped New York who feature many unique tours including the remanence of Penn Station. Irish immigrants played a key role contributing to Fordham University. Many of them were migrating that direction from Manhattan. Later, Dagger John buys Fordham Manner. He also founded St. John’s University which eventually becomes Fordham. He got the name by coming to a New York that was very Protestant which contrasted to the Catholicism being brought over. Many people did not like the change being brought t

    • 1 hr
    New York's Famous Department Stores

    New York's Famous Department Stores

    An exploration of some of New York’s most historic and iconic department stores.

    We will explore how shopping habits have changed throughout the City’s history and the effects that commerce had on everything from women’s emancipation to holiday traditions.

    Macy’s, Saks Fifth Avenue, Bergdorf Goodman’s, B. Altman’s, Bloomingdale's, Wannamaker’s Lord & Taylor and Bonwit Teller were some of the august names both past and present.

    My guest is Rediscovering New York regular and the show’s Special Consultant, David Griffin of Landmark Branding, https://landmarkbranding.com ( https://landmarkbranding.com/ ).



    Tune in for this fascinating conversation at *TalkRadio.nyc* ( http://talkradio.nyc ) or watch the *Facebook Video by Clicking Here* ( https://fb.watch/507roIfEd8/ ).

    *Show Notes*
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    *Segment 1*

    The show begins by reflecting on all of the historic topics that have been covered and where they can be accessed. This then translates to a discussion on department stores with guest David Griffin who is a writer, blogger, CEO and owner of Landmark Branding.. He was originally born in Long Island and lived there for twelve years before moving a bit north to get closer to family. Many great stores in New York are no longer with us but so many remain. David majored in Art History in college and is an expert on New York history, He states that a department store is a store that sells more than one dry good. The first one in New York was Stewart’s Department Store that was the first to hold a series of fashion shows and helped develop a luxury experience when shopping. Siegell-Cooper is a store that rises and falls within a 25 year period which is rare. They originated in Chicago then moved to New York looking to expand. They grew to 120 different departments including a bank, arcade, ticketbooth and more.

    Segment 2

    Siegell-Cooper was a store that mixed dry goods with wet goods. They sold groceries along with dry goods. The downfall of the store takes place once the owner is convinced to sell the business after he over extends himself trying to make the perfect one stop shop. In addition, another store was rivalling him. Eventually he opens back up but people are no longer shopping at the same extent. Later, Macy’s opened in 1858. Business is not flowing at first but it does later. Once it does, they are forced to pay about one million dollars just to keep the corner of land they were operating on. Macy’s now hosts one of the biggest parades on the holiday of Thanksgiving. As a game, they used to have balloons float down on people who could then exchange it for a cash prize. This got shut down due to the hazard that it was creating in the 1930’s.

    Segment 3

    David founded Landmark Branding in 2014. The company offers branding and marketing support for real estate, architecture and design companies. The department store Gimbels becomes a major rival to Macy’s once it emerges. By 1930 they had several flagship stores including one neighboring Macy’s building in New York City. Gimbels was more plain and straightforward. It was not intended to be as fancy as the others. They catered to middle class people. Their downfall was their lack of appealing qualities compared to their counterparts. People began to feel like there was no need to visit New York just to shop at a generic store. B. Altman and Company was a luxury department store that was founded in New York in 1865. The flagship store on Fifth Avenue in New York ran from 1906 to 1989 before falling to bankruptcy.

    Segment 4

    Another store that closed recently is Lord & Taylor. They were founded in 1826 and were located up the road from B. Altman. David recalls them as a convenient department store to stop in and admire their alluring windows.They also had great holiday displays. Sax Fifth Avenue is a store that branched from Lord & Taylor

    • 1 hr
    Take me Out To The Ballgame... Of Yesteryear

    Take me Out To The Ballgame... Of Yesteryear

    On this week’s show we will explore the City’s temples to Baseball that are no longer physically here, but which live in many memories and many hearts. My guests will be returning guest, historian, and author *Jason Antos* , president of the *Queens Historical Society* ( https://queenshistoricalsociety.org/ ) , and author of “ *Shea Stadium* ( https://amzn.to/3tauCBe ) ”; and journalist, educator and sports historian *David Kaplan* , founding director of the *Yogi Berra Museum and Learning Center* ( https://yogiberramuseum.org/ ).

    Tune in for this fascinating conversation at *TalkRadio.nyc* ( https://d38rqs2egh08o4.cloudfront.net/link_click/iamfcIdhFS_bkWBk/011d23a7cca98927db844583ca6aa495 ) or watch the *Facebook Livestream by clicking here* ( https://fb.watch/4ST86F8Oh-/ ) *.*

    *Show Notes*
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    Segment 1

    Jeff begins the show by introducing the topic of historical sports stadiums along with the two guests. He reads off the long list of pieces that Jason has written throughout his career. Next, he introduces David Kaplan stating that he is an adjunct professor at Montclair State University and the founding director of the Yogi Berra Museum and Learning Center. Jason has always had a passion for sports and the history of New York which helped to fuel him. While in high school, he realized that he wanted to do writing and journalism professionally. He graduated from the University of Miami and got a job writing for the Gazette Newspaper. Dave attended Cortland State University, a school that embraces sports. His dream was to combine his two passions of sports and journalism which led to him becoming a sports editor. After introductions, they begin discussing the history of where the first few baseball games were being held. The first baseball game where admission was charged in a stadium was in the town of Corona. The Brooklyn Dodgers were playing in Washington Park but eventually they relocated to Brownsville. Since they were not getting the same amount of attendance while playing here, they moved back.

    Segment 2

    To begin this segment, the Polo Grounds are discussed. The original Polo Grounds was designed for the sport of polo. However, it became the home of the New York Giants in the late 1800’s. John McGraw and Bill Terry were two of the great historic Giants players. Eventually Willie Mays began playing there and left an amazing legacy behind. They eventually left N.Y. because they were persuaded that the west coast was more to offer. They would reunite with the Dodgers and resume the rivalry. In addition, the field they were playing in was not really designed for cars and New York was transitioning into something new which convinced the baseball club to move. Eventually, the Polo Grounds was refurbished for the Mets to play their first few seasons. The Polo Grounds also was the home of the Yankees from 1913 to 1922. Next, Paul Ebbets was discussed who originally was a bookkeeper for the Brooklyn Dodgers and eventually took over the team. He was going to keep the name of Washington Park but was eventually convinced to title the field after himself.

    Segment 3

    Next, Shea Stadium was discussed. Jason remembers watching game six of the 1986 World Series live when he was younger which only increased his love for the sport and the stadium. Furthermore, David begins discussing Yogi Berra and how down to earth he was. He states that what you saw was what you got. Yogi was part of one of the most memorable Yankee teams. He is a Hall of Fame catcher for the team who everyone loved. Next Ebbets field is brought up again. It meant a lot to all of the New Yorkers. Many game changing players played there including Jackie Robinson. The Dodgers ultimately left Brooklyn because of money. Parking was an issue and many New Yorkers were moving to Long Island. They did not want to change boroughs because they were so c

    • 1 hr 3 min
    The Scots in New York

    The Scots in New York

    *The Impact of Scottish Immigrants on the City and our Cityscape*

    On this week’s show, broadcast during Tartan Week here in New York, we will celebrate how Scottish immigrants contributed to and influenced New York, especially our architectural heritage.

    My guests will be architect *John Kinnear* , founder of *John Kinnear Architects* ( http://johnkinneararchitects.com/ ) , and board member of the *American Scottish Foundation* ( https://www.americanscottishfoundation.com/home/index.html ) ; and *Graham Dobbin* , business coach and public speaker at *Asentiv New York* ( https://newyork.asentiv.com/our_team/graham-dobbin/ ) , and host of his own trailblazing radio program “ *The Mind Behind Leadership* ( https://www.talkradio.nyc/shows/the-mind-behind ) ”



    Tune in for this fascinating conversation at *TalkRadio.nyc* ( https://d38rqs2egh08o4.cloudfront.net/link_click/hYOcGcZoJy_bkUPx/79db7ec7dfb71ff9a7dbb474048dd630 ) or watch the *Facebook Livestream by clicking here* ( https://fb.watch/4JPpwl8jwz/ ) *.*

    *Show Notes*
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    Segment 1

    tonight on Rediscovering New York we’re taking a deep dive into Scottish heritage. Starting with tartan week, it is a Celebration of Scotland contributions Scott’s have made in the United States United States. If you look up AmericanScottishfoundation.org there you will find the events that are going on this week. there is no parade this year so all events are happening virtually. Our first guess is John Kinnear, founder of John Kinnear Architects, and board member of the American Scottish Foundation. John found a passion for architecture very early in life. He was Building things and taking trips around New York. So he felt it would be a great fit. The Scottish been here since the formation of New York. The Livingstons were the first family to Really make a name for themselves and they purchased land across the Hudson River. Alexander Hamilton One of the founding fathers. his family was also one of the wealthiest families in Scotland, but he did not end up inheriting, and had to work his way up. John McCone was another Scottish man who became famous for his architecture in New York and eight of his buildings have become landmarks. He has cemented himself in New York history.

    Segment 2

    if you’d like to contact John you can go to JohnKinneararchitect.com. Charles McCain was a Architect of Scottish descent born in America. The University club on fifth Avenue is such a gem.It’s marketed as an Italian Renaissance. The interior of the building is beautiful; the library is modeled after the Vatican library. He also helped develop Pennsylvania station, the original Penn station, another staple in New York architecture. Wallter cook is known for being the architect of the Carnegie mansion. Frank Lloyd Wright was another Scottish an American architect, designer, writer, and educator. He designed more than 1,000 structures over a creative period of 70 years. Sadly he designed a house for Marilyn Monroe that was never built and he passed away in New York.

    Segment 3

    Our second guest is Graham Dobbin, business coach and public speaker at Asentiv New York, and host of his own trailblazing radio program “The Mind Behind Leadership. Graham I just was drawn to New York and it’s magic and decided to build a home here. Carnegie, One of the most famous architects Settled in Pennsylvania. Carnegie became well off at a young age as his investment paid off . Putting money into Railroads Oil derricks and bridges. And he founded Carnegie steel. We should become the biggest steel company in the world. He understood people and business and that made him the success that he was.

    Segment 4

    Graham Works with multiple companies such as BMW, google. As a business coach he really is involved. He takes a practical approach and knows that one size does not fit all when it comes to worki

    • 1 hr 2 min
    East Harlem - Not The Part of Harlem You Probably Have Heard About

    East Harlem - Not The Part of Harlem You Probably Have Heard About

    On this week’s show we will visit East Harlem. My guests will be returning Rediscovering New York historian *Kevin Draper* , Director of *New York Historical Tours* ( https://newyorkhistoricaltours.com/ ) ; and *Julio Valdez* , Founder of *JVS Project Space* ( https://www.jvsprojectspace.com/ ) , which provides professional artists the opportunity to develop and present their work in the City.

    Tune in for this fascinating conversation at *TalkRadio.nyc* ( https://d38rqs2egh08o4.cloudfront.net/link_click/hN7GsEQpC8_9MMvG/a800cc88a6df12a608735e65e239efe5 ) or watch the *Facebook Livestream by clicking here* ( https://fb.watch/4AlSu3uHhN/ ) *.*

    *Show Notes*
    ------------

    Segment 1

    Tonight we are going back to the island of Manhattan and visiting East Harlem The first guest is Kevin Draper. He is the Director of New York Historical Tours. Kevin. Is a respected historic consultant for media publications such as CBS ABC The New York Times. Kevin grew up on Long Island, And he went to school in New York and he’s just never left. Kevin always had a passion for New York history since he was five years old and when he got older he just decided to switch up his career and make his passion his career. During the 19 century is where East Harlem really started to take shape as they put in the railroad. As the neighborhood was first developing The businesses that you would see were restaurants and barrel making for The breweries. East Harlem gods name Late 19 century is when the local started calling It East Harlem. The communities that would move to East Harlem in the 19th century were Irish, Jewish, and Italian and German.He’s tall and became a model for urban living during those times.

    Segment 2

    Covid has really affected a lot of businesses but thankfully Kevin has reinstated his tours If you go to his website NewYorkhistoricaltors.com all the tours that are listed are now available. They are available as private tours. Meaning that it’ll just be you .East Harlem was the original Little Italy. East Harlem has a rich histories of Italians and Patty’s is one of the most famous restaurants in New York opened up in the 1930s. Was also home to a lot of organized crime, such as The blackhand. They would scare people into extortion and that was really the beginning of the Mafia

    Segment 3

    Our second guest on tonight's show is Julio Valdez. Julio was born in Santo Domingo, The Dominican Republic. He’s a painter, a printmaker teacher, and an installation artist. has exhibited internationally since 1984. This training and print making an oil painting in New York and in the Dominican Republic. Julio studied in the national school of fine arts in the Dominican Republic from 1984 to 1986. He founded the Julio Valdez Studio. specializes in. Nontoxic contemporary printmaking. He's had 31 printmaking exhibitions most recently In 2020 at June Kelly’s Gallery in Soho. Julia was always interested in it but decided to really take it seriously when he was 15. His father had passed away but right before his passing he set up Oil painting classes for Julio. He was Offered the fellowship for a year in New York and just built a life here.

    Segment 4

    Julio has a studio in East Harlem. Originally his first year was in the Lower Eastside. He became unhappy there because he felt like it was very pretentious and it was at home to real artists. I felt that Estar warm was home to a larger Latino community. and East Harlem brought that flavor and feel of culture that he was missing.

    • 1 hr 2 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
28 Ratings

28 Ratings

Insights will transform you ,

A bona fide journey into NYC’s DNA, hosted by an expert!

I’ve been a fan since my first Rediscovering New York walking tour with Jeff Goodman 7-8 years ago. The pandemic has accelerated Jeff’s beloved excursions onto digital platforms so he can now broadcast to the world. I ought to know: I’m now an ExPat living abroad and I look forward to Jeff’s NYC podcast so I can keep close to the city in which I spent my life.
For those trying out Rediscovering New York for the first time, I envy you the experience. You’ll be impressed by the vast catalog Jeff has built up, by the thoroughness of his approach, by the experts he regularly turns to for deep dives, and by his joyful professionalism. Plus, you will learn so much about the history, geography and the fables spun by the life force we call NYC.
Enjoy the tour!

Shanebaker ,

Everyone should tune into this!

Started listening to this podcast and I LOVE it. Living in the city since 2012 after immigrating from Ireland, and I'm always interested in the history of this great wonderland! Keep up the great work, and I'm looking forward to going through all the episodes !

tommery29 ,

Great show, great host

I thoroughly enjoy this show. Sure I’m a sponsor, but it’s not just that! Jeff is a wealth of information and really lets his guests shine. The result is the weaving of a tapestry as rich and stories as the neighborhoods he features weekly. Bravo!

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