279 episodes

Regenerative Skills is based on the pursuit of a regenerative life. A lifestyle centered on stewardship of the natural world, strong connections to community, and the daily habits that bring us closer to those goals. Each week learn actionable information from experts around the world that you can apply in your own life. Together we can regenerate our planet and our communities.

Regenerative Skills Oliver Goshey

    • Education
    • 4.7 • 78 Ratings

Regenerative Skills is based on the pursuit of a regenerative life. A lifestyle centered on stewardship of the natural world, strong connections to community, and the daily habits that bring us closer to those goals. Each week learn actionable information from experts around the world that you can apply in your own life. Together we can regenerate our planet and our communities.

    A first look at our regenerative project in the new year!

    A first look at our regenerative project in the new year!

    2022 has been an intense year for me behind the scenes. I don't often talk about my personal life here on the show, but I've had some major milestones this year that I'm excited to share with you.







    It's been a long journey of almost 4 years since leaving the project that I cofounded with my two colleagues in Guatemala around the time that I started this podcast, until now when my partner and I are recently moved into our new little farm in the mountains of Catalunya in Spain.







    In this episode, for the first time, I'm going to be speaking with my partner Alba about what that journey has been like and what we have planned for our home, farm, and the businesses that will support its development.









    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YsCRc99iQA&t=15s











    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rvFZJBC_Ug&t=6s











    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vniWaDUiW8g

















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    Links:







    https://www.instagram.com/regenerative_skills/







    https://www.instagram.com/molidebojons/

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Nick Steiner and Oliver Goshey on the scope of water cycle restoration options for any project size

    Nick Steiner and Oliver Goshey on the scope of water cycle restoration options for any project size

    I’ll keep today’s intro real short because this is a long episode. The short of it is that my good friend Nick Steiner and I have been diving real deep into the topic of landscape hydrology and water cycle restoration both on our own properties and through our work with clients and farmers all around Europe.







    In the process we’ve become complete nerds about this topic and all of the incredible potential that working with water systems can have for the ecology and quality of life where it’s applied appropriately.







    So today, Nick and I are just gonna lay it all out and summarize some of the many learnings we’ve gathered through courses, research, personal experience and case studies from our work.







    We’ll be looking at hydrological work through small home scale actions to massive regional and country level policy change and transformation. 







    So instead of explaining all of this twice, let’s just jump right in. 







    Join the discord discussion channel to answer the weekly questions and learn new skills with the whole community







    Links:







    Contact us to schedule a free water project planning session







    https://www.linkedin.com/in/oliver-goshey-17a518122/







    https://www.linkedin.com/in/steiner-nick/







    https://www.instagram.com/permanick_permaculture/







    https://www.instagram.com/regenerative_skills/

    • 1 hr 41 min
    Zach Weiss and Lorenzo Costa break down the design and process for restoring the water cycle of Tuscany

    Zach Weiss and Lorenzo Costa break down the design and process for restoring the water cycle of Tuscany

    It’s not often I get to do interviews in person, and it’s not often that I get a chance to go to Italy to visit amazing farms and take a course on regional scale landscape hydrological restoration either. In fact this was my first visit to Italy at all. All of these fortunate circumstances came together at the end of November, a couple weeks ago, thanks to the incredible efforts and coordination by my friend Ed Cutler, the director of the Tuscany Environment Foundation.







    Early on Ed invited me to come and assist on a four day course that he was planning with Zach Weiss from Elemental Ecosystems and Lorenzo Costa from La Scoscesa farm, and since I’ve been in Zach’s Water Stories course since the beginning I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to go out and get my hands dirty with a few of my heroes while working on one of my biggest topics of passion.So today’s interview is taking place up on Lorenzo’s farm a day after the course wrapped up with incredible views of the mountain valleys and vineyards around as the three of us discuss some of the most important learnings of the week. 







    In that session we covered a lot of ground. Much like in the course itself we zoom in and out throughout the discussion to explore the challenges and opportunities for water restoration work at a large scale and in smaller and more specific examples. Lorenzo gave us great information and context on the history of land use in the Tuscan area as well as his own farm. Zach explained a lot of bigger picture concepts about working with water and the solutions for degraded landscapes and mismanaged infrastructure.







    We also refer regularly to the farm that hosted the course of the previous days, Tenuta di Paganico, which I highly recommend that you check out. I’ll put the link to their website and social media in the show notes. Despite the challenges that they have with soil erosion and old water retention features that are no longer functioning, they are doing amazing work with forest management and grazing animals in silvopasture systems among others. I also highly recommend stopping by their farm store and restaurant if you ever find yourself near the town of Paganico. 







    I know this isn’t a super detailed introduction to the interview, but everything is very well spelled out from personal introductions through the progress of the learnings from the course so I’m not worried that you’ll fall behind.







    Join the discord discussion channel to answer the weekly questions and learn new skills with the whole community







    Links:







    https://www.instagram.com/lorenzo.costa1/







    https://www.instagram.com/lascoscesa/







    https://www.elementalecosystems.com/







    https://www.waterstories.com/







    https://www.youtube.com/@Water_Stories









    https://www.tenutadipaganico.it/en/









    https://www.instagram.com/tenuta_di_paganico/

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Scott Zona on the gardener’s guide to biology

    Scott Zona on the gardener’s guide to biology

    Today’s session, in contrast to the more challenging subject of the last two weeks, will take me back into my comfort zone, namely, nerding out about plants and how bizarre and amazing they are. 







    I don’t claim to be a plant expert, far from it. I’m more like a fanboy of a stadium band that has been around forever pumping out the hits and that I only found out about recently and act like I discovered them. I hope those of you who’ve been growing and studying plants your whole lives will forgive me. 







    A perfect example of a person who’s been a lifelong aficionado of the plant kingdom is Scott Zona. Scott holds a B.S. in horticulture and an M.S. in botany from the University of Florida. His Ph.D. in botany is from Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden (now the California Botanic Garden) and Claremont Graduate University, California.







    He has explored plants in Florida, California, Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, the Pacific islands, Indonesia, Malaysia, New Guinea, and Madagascar. His interests are in the diversity and natural history of tropical plants, especially palms, salvias, and bryophytes, and has published over 175 articles on these topics in various magazines, book chapters, and scholarly journals.







    He is the co-author of two books, Encyclopedia of Cultivated Palms (2nd ed.) and The Palm Collection at the Jardín Botánico de Culiacán.







    His third book, A Gardener’s Guide to Botany, will be out in December 2022. Scott is also a member of American Bryological and Lichenological Society, Cactus & Succulent Society of America, International Association of Bryologists, International Palm Society, North American Rock Garden Society, and the Royal Horticultural Society and he is a Research Collaborator with the Herbarium of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 







    All of this has made him way over qualified to write his new book, A Gardener’s Guide to Botany: The biology behind the plants you love, how they grow, and what they need. 







    In this interview, Scott and I really just spend the whole time talking about why plants are the coolest and why everyone should love them too. This brings us through a world of plant physiology and biological processes, nutrition hydration and soil health principles, and the incredible adaptability and senses that have evolved in the vegetative world to overcome all manner of stresses and challenges in different environments. 







    Despite the fact that Scott reminds me a few times that his book is not about how to grow plants or garden, I can’t help but prod him for advice and insights about exactly these topics since that’s my own most vivid connection with plants. All the same there’s something for every plant lover in this episode.







    Join the discord discussion channel to answer the weekly questions and learn new skills with the whole community







    Links:







    https://bookshop.org/p/books/a-gardener-s-guide-to-botany-the-biology-behind-the-plants-you-love-how-they-grow-and-what-they-need-scott-zona/18396717?ean=9780760374450

    • 1 hr 8 min
    Jake Leguee gives a perspective from modern technological farming: Part 2

    Jake Leguee gives a perspective from modern technological farming: Part 2

    Today we’ll be wrapping up the second in a two part interview that I’ve been looking forward to doing for a long time. If you missed the first part of the interview then I really recommend that you go back and listen to it before this second half to get the proper context. 







    As a quick recap, I’ve been speaking with conventional and industrial farmers for some time, not only to better understand the industry and the management practices they use, but also to understand the people who manage these farms, the decisions and challenges they face, and both the differences and commonalities they have with the regenerative farmers I speak to more regularly. 







    In an effort to raise awareness of these issues and to introduce some perspective into the conversation that is going on now around the world about how we should produce food and manage the natural world that we’ve come to dominate, I reached out to a voice that I’ve been following for a number of months and that I believe represents very honestly the realities of modern industrial farming operations in North America. Jake Leguee is managing over 15,000 acres near Weyburn in southern Saskatchewan in Canada.







    He grows durum, wheat, canola, peas, lentils, and flax and farms with his family, including his wife and three young sons, and several other family members. Together they are a 3rd-generation farm that strives to continually improve - to leave things better than they found them. Jake is also involved in various places in the agriculture industry as well. As a farmer and an agronomist, agriculture, and the science and business therein, is his fascination and passion.







    In the first half of the interview we covered Jake's family’s history into farming and how has overseen some major transformations in how the land and business are managed since taking over the farm business. We also unpacked some of the points of friction that farmers like Jake have experienced when dealing with legislators and regulators in Canada, as well as how this is often representative of many other countries around the world. We wrapped up on a note about the importance of including farmers directly in discussion at the government level whenever decisions are being made that would affect their work and the farming sector in general. 







    In this second part we’ll be exploring further some of the misunderstandings that Jake has observed about how the general public understands modern farming, the pressures that farm owners like him are under, and even how these misunderstandings can be overcome. We also talk about some of the more controversial management practices that modern farmers engage in and why Jake defends the use of certain crop protection chemicals, GMO crops, and the use of synthetic fertilizers among other issues.







    Just as a quick reminder, my aim in giving voice to these positions is not to advocate for or to defend them, but rather to share the perspective and reality of the farmers that those of us in the regenerative fields often villainize or try to distance ourselves from. I believe that it’s essential to understand their positions and look for common ground rather than trying to convince others of our way of seeing things. I believe Jake does an admirable job of bringing thoughtfulness and compassionate advocacy to his way of life and farming and I hope that this will open up a larger discussion of how we can better include and welcome conventional farmers into the regenerative transformation of the farm and food industries that many of us are hoping to advance. 







    Join the discord discussion channel to answer the weekly questions and learn new skills with the whole community/a...

    • 59 min
    Jake Leguee gives a perspective from modern technological farming: Part 1

    Jake Leguee gives a perspective from modern technological farming: Part 1

    Today I’ll begin the first in a two part interview that I’ve been looking forward to doing for a long time, but let me give you some background context before we get started. It’s no secret that I’m a major proponent of regenerative agriculture and many of the different methodologies, practices, and concepts that this wide label contains. I believe strongly that our generation has an opportunity and an obligation to reconcile our food production system with the natural world that we depend on and to use our knowledge, wisdom, and access to resources to regenerate the health of the Earth’s biomes as a primary function through which we produce value for our own species in the form of food, fiber, fuel, and medicine.With that said, I’ve long been observing an ugly manifestation of this advocacy creep into the online and media discourse around regenerative agriculture. As we hold up examples of success stories and best practices, many of these discussions are also propped up on derogatory mentions of conventional or industrial farmers and farming practices. Some of these even expand into contests of who is more regenerative or who is doing better for the climate. I am certain that insults, negative assumptions, and general dismissal of the people and practices in this sector does nothing to bring their voices to the table, and often serves to further separate our ideals in the regenerative ag movement from the people who we should be working hardest to welcome. 







    For this reason I’ve been speaking with conventional and industrial farmers for some time, not only to better understand the industry and the management practices they use, but also to understand the people who manage these farms, the decisions and challenges they face, and both the differences and commonalities they have with the regenerative farmers I speak to more regularly. 







    In an effort to raise awareness of these issues and to introduce some perspective into the conversation that is going on now around the world about how we should produce food and manage the natural world that we’ve come to dominate, I reached out to a voice that I’ve been following for a number of months and that I believe represents very honestly the realities of modern industrial farming operations in North America. Jake Leguee is managing over 15,000 acres near Weyburn in southern Saskatchewan in Canada. He grows durum, wheat, canola, peas, lentils, and flax and farms with his family, including his wife and three young sons, and several other family members. Together they are a 3rd-generation farm that strives to continually improve - to leave things better than they found them. Jake is also involved in various places in the agriculture industry as well. As a farmer and an agronomist, agriculture, and the science and business therein, is his fascination and passion.







    My intention with this interview needs a little explanation. I’ve been reading Jake’s blog on thelifeofafarmer.com since the beginning of the year. There are few other places on the web where I’ve found confident and first hand defenses of many of the pariahs of regenerative and organic agriculture such as the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, GMOs and the massive increase in the average size of farms, yet Jake manages to do so in an articulate and compassionate way.I need to also mention that I do not agree with or defend the positions that Jake promotes in this talk, but that’s not at all the point. If you’ve been listening to this show for any length of time, you’re already well aware of my beliefs and opinions. The guests that I’ve interviewed over the last 6 years have done a much better job than I could at explaining them as well. My hope here is rather to reconnect those of us who are so susceptible to getting lost in an echo chamber of agreement with the humanity and core motivations that ...

    • 1 hr 8 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
78 Ratings

78 Ratings

J. Barshop ,

Deeply substantial and amazingly practical

It’s obvious that Oliver puts extraordinary effort in covering salient topics and finding guests that are authentic and truly care about being a positive force in this world - the insights they bring to bear is still mind-blowing Every. Single. Time.

No matter the subject, you’re guaranteed to gain something from every episode - can’t recommend The Abundant Edge enough 🙌

PNWSHEEP ,

Awesome!

Just stumbled on this podcast and I am loving it. Great interviews and amazing guests.

livinglight2day ,

Great Learning Experience

This is a wonderful podcast. Love all the first hand information that is available for new homesteaders with no prior farming experience at all.

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