55 episodes

This isn’t a podcast for total beginners. We’re going to assume that you know what plot structure is, what a protagonist is, where ideas come from, and how to use a semicolon. This is a podcast for people who can already write okay, but want to do better.

Rite Gud Kittysneezes

    • Education
    • 3.3 • 60 Ratings

This isn’t a podcast for total beginners. We’re going to assume that you know what plot structure is, what a protagonist is, where ideas come from, and how to use a semicolon. This is a podcast for people who can already write okay, but want to do better.

    Space Racism, Oppressed Wizards, and Other Marginalized Fantasy Allegories

    Space Racism, Oppressed Wizards, and Other Marginalized Fantasy Allegories

    Sci-fi, fantasy, and horror have always used speculative elements to express political ideas. HG Wells wrote War of the Worlds as a reaction to British colonialism, Tolkien explored his feelings about World War I and industrialization in The Lord of the Rings, and Mary Shelley had a lot to say about gender and modernity in Frankenstein. Many speculative authors use fantastic creatures–mutants, fairies, werewolves, androids, vampires, and so on–as allegories for oppressed people. Sometimes that can work. But sometimes, it falls flat in terms of storytelling and politics.











    In the first episode of our second season, Ashely Adams joins us to talk about plant influencers, gay werewolves, and what House in the Cerulean Sea has in common with The Iron Dream.





    Links:







    How Allegory in Sci-Fi Can Narrow Representation





    Interview with TJ Klune





    48 Books by Indigenous Writers to Read to Understand Residential Schools





    Best of Super Best Friends play Detroit: Become Human





    A super-dark deleted scene from Zootopia





    Hijacking the Dead? Terry Pratchett and the Trans ‘Debate’





    Grey





    About Rite Gud: Raquel S. Benedict is an author, appearing in Fantasy and Science Fiction and Gardner Dozois’ The Very Best of the Best: 35 Years of The Year’s Best Science Fiction. Matt Keeley, founder of Kittysneezes, is producing Rite Gud for KS Media, LLC. Rite Gud is a Kittysneezes production. If you have questions, comments and concerns, email ritegud – at – kittysneezes – dot – com. Rite Gud is also on Patreon, at patreon.com/ritegud. Patrons receive access to the official Kittysneezes Discord, exclusive episodes and more. 

    The Rite Gud theme is by OK Glass. Follow them on Twitter, YouTube and Bandcamp, and at OK.Glass.  



    Rite Gud is supported by readers like you. If you enjoy what you’ve heard here, please consider supporting Rite Gud on Patreon, or via the Kittysneezes Boutique. 

    • 1 hr 8 min
    Writing Beyond Limits with Naben Ruthnum

    Writing Beyond Limits with Naben Ruthnum

    Writers are often under pressure to follow rules, to write to the market, to carefully fit themselves into a safe cultural and commercial niche. You have to stick to one genre, and follow the standard recipe for that genre, or else audiences will get mad and your book won’t sell. At least, that’s what publishers say. But some writers know better.





    In this episode, Naben Ruthnum joins us to talk about body horror, the pressures of the market, and how Indian diaspora writers get pushed into writing formulaic “curry” books.







    (Image via NEON)





    Links:





    *

    Helpmeet



    *

    Find You in the Dark



    *

    Your Life Is Mine



    *

    A Hero of Our Time



    *

    Why Curry Doesn’t Really Exist





    About Rite Gud: Raquel S. Benedict is an author, appearing in Fantasy and Science Fiction and Gardner Dozois’ The Very Best of the Best: 35 Years of The Year’s Best Science Fiction. Matt Keeley, founder of Kittysneezes, is producing Rite Gud for KS Media, LLC. Rite Gud is a Kittysneezes production. If you have questions, comments and concerns, email ritegud – at – kittysneezes – dot – com. Rite Gud is also on Patreon, at patreon.com/ritegud. Patrons receive access to the official Kittysneezes Discord, exclusive episodes and more. 

    The Rite Gud theme is by Surgeryhead. Follow them on Twitter, YouTube and Soundcloud.



    Rite Gud is supported by readers like you. If you enjoy what you’ve heard here, please consider supporting Rite Gud on Patreon, or via the Kittysneezes Boutique. 

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Internet Fiction

    Internet Fiction

    The internet is a huge part of our lives, but putting it into our fiction can be difficult. Many writers leave it out of their stories entirely. Others try to incorporate it into their work with awkward results. How should our fiction handle the internet? Should our fiction try to handle the internet at all? Cartoonist RE Parrish joins us to talk about the uneasy marriage of writing and the internet—incorporating the internet into fiction, using the internet as a medium for fiction, and why it’s so hard to write a good social media epistolary novel.

    Links:



    * RE Parrish

    * I Sexually Identify as the ‘I Sexually Identify as an Attack Helicopter’ Controversy

    * VERY ONLINE

    * 17776

    * Reconsidering the Conventions of the So-Called Internet Novel

    * E Unibus Pluram (TV fiction essay)

    * The Empath

    * OC Protective Services

    * 9MOTHER9HORSE9EYES9



    Header image by Tony Webster

    About Rite Gud: Raquel S. Benedict is an author, appearing in Fantasy and Science Fiction and Gardner Dozois’ The Very Best of the Best: 35 Years of The Year’s Best Science Fiction. Matt Keeley, founder of Kittysneezes, is producing Rite Gud for KS Media, LLC. Rite Gud is a Kittysneezes production. If you have questions, comments and concerns, email ritegud – at – kittysneezes – dot – com. Rite Gud is also on Patreon, at patreon.com/ritegud. Patrons receive access to the official Kittysneezes Discord, exclusive episodes, critiques and more. 

    The Rite Gud theme is by Surgeryhead. Follow them on Twitter, YouTube and Soundcloud.



    Rite Gud is supported by readers like you. If you enjoy what you’ve heard here, please consider supporting Rite Gud on Patreon, or via the Kittysneezes Boutique. 

    • 1 hr 12 min
    Tales From the Slush Pile

    Tales From the Slush Pile

    When you send a short story to a magazine, it probably doesn’t go directly to the editor. Instead, it ends up in what’s called the slush pile–the pool of unsolicited work waiting for review. Who reviews it? Weirdos like us. In this episode of Rite Gud, we’re joined by slush readers NM Whitley and Karl P to talk about why stories get rejected, retro ’70s gender war fiction, and the art of rejectomancy.





    Links:







    How to Escape the Slush Pile





    The Shocking Truth about the Slush Pile





    Very Recent History: The “Slush Pile”





    Against Quirky Writing





    Psychotic Operas 2: Green Box Edition





    NM Whitley, “Fest”





    Improvise: Scene from the Inside Out





    Nectar for Rejectomancers





    About Rite Gud: Raquel S. Benedict is an author, appearing in Fantasy and Science Fiction and Gardner Dozois’ The Very Best of the Best: 35 Years of The Year’s Best Science Fiction. Matt Keeley, founder of Kittysneezes, is producing Rite Gud for KS Media, LLC. Rite Gud is a Kittysneezes production. If you have questions, comments and concerns, email ritegud – at – kittysneezes – dot – com. Rite Gud is also on Patreon, at patreon.com/ritegud. Patrons receive access to the official Kittysneezes Discord, exclusive episodes, critiques and more. 

    The Rite Gud theme is by Surgeryhead. Follow them on Twitter, YouTube and Soundcloud.



    Rite Gud is supported by readers like you. If you enjoy what you’ve heard here, please consider supporting Rite Gud on Patreon, or via the Kittysneezes Boutique. 

    • 1 hr 17 min
    Never Bring a Pen to a Sword Fight

    Never Bring a Pen to a Sword Fight

    They say the pen is mightier than the sword, but it is way easier to kill a guy with a sword than with a pen. We love art–it’s important to us and it’s meaningful and a worthwhile pursuit–but art alone does not change the material world. What, then, is the purpose of writing? Why do we do this if we’re not saving the world? Here to talk about this is poet Danielle Rose.











    Header image via Petri Damstén.





    Links:







    Barren Magazine Fires Editor over Cynical Tweet About Poetry





    Orwell’s List





    at first & then





    The History of Mountains





    How ‘The Birth of a Nation’ revived the KKK





    About Rite Gud: Raquel S. Benedict is an author, appearing in Fantasy and Science Fiction and Gardner Dozois’ The Very Best of the Best: 35 Years of The Year’s Best Science Fiction. Matt Keeley, founder of Kittysneezes, is producing Rite Gud for KS Media, LLC. Rite Gud is a Kittysneezes production. If you have questions, comments and concerns, email ritegud – at – kittysneezes – dot – com. Rite Gud is also on Patreon, at patreon.com/ritegud. Patrons receive access to the official Kittysneezes Discord, exclusive episodes, critiques and more. 

    The Rite Gud theme is by Surgeryhead. Follow them on Twitter, YouTube and Soundcloud.



    Rite Gud is supported by readers like you. If you enjoy what you’ve heard here, please consider supporting Rite Gud on Patreon, or via the Kittysneezes Boutique. 

    • 55 min
    A Rite Gud Minifesto

    A Rite Gud Minifesto

    The changing of the guard in the early 2000s and the euthanization of the reactionary Sad Puppy movement in the early 2010s should have ushered in a new era of speculative fiction, an era of creative freedom and experimentation.



    It did not.







    Instead of welcoming and mentoring a new generation of authors from all walks of life, the current publishing establishment primarily supports friends who can afford to attend the same costly private workshops, MFA programs, and industry galas. This pay-to-play model hurts any writer without economic privilege, but it hits oppressed people particularly hard, since people of marginalized backgrounds are statistically less likely to be affluent than their white, cisgender, heterosexual counterparts.







    Like any gated community, speculative fiction ruthlessly polices its entrances. Any new writer who breaks into the scene without paying the gatekeeper, either in cash or in flattery, is treated with suspicion and marked “unsafe.” Any new writer who dares to challenge readers sees their work denounced as “harmful”—a 21st century euphemism for degenerate art–and is chased out of the community with harassment and abuse. Ironically, this cruelty is often inflicted by the very same people who were similarly attacked by the Rabid Puppies just a few years ago.







    Given this authoritarian restriction of expression, is it any wonder that the genre has narrowed and stagnated? Why innovate, when innovation carries so much risk and so little reward?







    Speculative fiction has stopped experimenting with style; instead, the short stories that attract buzz and acclaim are astonishingly similar to each other in tone, structure, and theme.







    Speculative fiction has stopped looking to the future or showing us new worlds; instead it rehashes old stories and reiterates dusty debates about red shirts and final girls and Omelas, like Miss Havisham in a moth-eaten Starfleet uniform.







    Speculative fiction is not living up to its potential. Speculative fiction could be so much more than it is, if the community’s leaders would only give it room to breathe.







    To challenge the suffocating, stultifying order of contemporary speculative fiction, we present an indisputable list of demands we are calling the Rite Gud Manifesto:







    Speculative fiction must be free to explore difficult subjects.







    Speculative fiction must be free to shock, disturb, sadden, and disgust readers.







    Speculative fiction must be free to experiment with form and style.







    Speculative fiction must be free to hold negative space.







    Speculative fiction must be free to ask questions without answers.







    Speculative fiction must be free to speak for itself rather than serving as an accessory to the author’s personal brand identity.







    Speculative fiction must be free to exist for its own sake.







    Speculative fiction must be free to face stylistic critique rather than serving purely as a litmus test for the artist’s perceived moral purity.







    Speculative fiction must be free to explore sexuality.







    Speculative fiction must be free to succeed even if the author hasn’t had the privilege to attend costly networking events like Clarion, Odyssey,

    • 6 min

Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5
60 Ratings

60 Ratings

cowboyplanet ,

Shrug emoji

If you can get through the intellectual status anxiety, a good casual cast.

be careful12341 ,

It’s good guys

I’m also a fan of Raquel’s Everyone is Beautiful piece for Blood Knife but found the podcast through people yelling at her for being right.

It’s particularly worth your time if you find yourself worn down by commercialized geek culture and the genre (and/or) publishing scenes; I definitely am, but if you collect Funko pops you might feel affronted. Sorry. No punches are pulled here. Content-wise, the guests are great and the insight into process is valuable. Discussion does tend to circle the same two or three topics a lot, so you might get worn out trying to binge it unless you’re personally angry at the Marvel nerds or Cassandra Clares of the world (which is fair). Personally, I’m pacing it out a bit.

Writing this review to hopefully even out the one-star bomb. This is a good podcast made by people who care a lot about craft. If that also describes you, give it a try.

Jack with the Cat ,

So glad I found this!

I discovered this after reading Raquel’s piece on sexlessness in contemporary blockbusters. The show is a perfect balance between thoughtful insight and casual venting between writers in conversation.

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