54 episodes

Science Fiction and Politics Class, Courtney Brown, Emory University.
It has long been known that science fiction often seeks to foretell future technological developments.
But it is also true that much science fiction foretells social science, and it can offer explicit commentaries on the political and social evolution of our societies.
Isaac Asimov's depiction of the new science of psychohistory, Fritz Lang's biting critique of human society in his science fiction movie "Metropolis," and H.G. Well’s similarly powerful perspective on social and political development as portrayed in his novel "The Time Machine," are just a few examples.
This seminar examines the role of science fiction as a powerful vehicle for social and political commentary, especially as it relates to the evolutionary tendencies of human societies.

Science Fiction and Politics, Courtney Brown, Emory University Courtney Brown, Ph.D.

    • Education
    • 4.1 • 32 Ratings

Science Fiction and Politics Class, Courtney Brown, Emory University.
It has long been known that science fiction often seeks to foretell future technological developments.
But it is also true that much science fiction foretells social science, and it can offer explicit commentaries on the political and social evolution of our societies.
Isaac Asimov's depiction of the new science of psychohistory, Fritz Lang's biting critique of human society in his science fiction movie "Metropolis," and H.G. Well’s similarly powerful perspective on social and political development as portrayed in his novel "The Time Machine," are just a few examples.
This seminar examines the role of science fiction as a powerful vehicle for social and political commentary, especially as it relates to the evolutionary tendencies of human societies.

    Redshirts by John Scalzi (Part 2 of 2): Science Fiction and Politics

    Redshirts by John Scalzi (Part 2 of 2): Science Fiction and Politics

    Science Fiction and Politics Class: Redshirts by John Scalzi (Part 2 of 2), Courtney Brown, Emory University.

    • 1 hr 7 min
    Redshirts by John Scalzi (Part 1 of 2): Science Fiction and Politics

    Redshirts by John Scalzi (Part 1 of 2): Science Fiction and Politics

    Science Fiction and Politics Class: Redshirts by John Scalzi (Part 1 of 2), Courtney Brown, Emory University.

    • 1 hr 14 min
    Rainbows End by Vernor Vinge (Part 2): Science Fiction and Politics

    Rainbows End by Vernor Vinge (Part 2): Science Fiction and Politics

    Science Fiction and Politics Class: Rainbows End by Vernor Vinge (Part 2), Courtney Brown, Emory University.

    • 1 hr 9 min
    Rainbows End by Vernor Vinge (Part 1): Science Fiction and Politics

    Rainbows End by Vernor Vinge (Part 1): Science Fiction and Politics

    Science Fiction and Politics Class: Rainbows End by Vernor Vinge (Part 1), Courtney Brown, Emory University.

    • 1 hr 8 min
    The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi (Part 2): Science Fiction and Politics

    The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi (Part 2): Science Fiction and Politics

    Science Fiction and Politics Class: The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi (Part 2), Courtney Brown, Emory University.

    • 1 hr 4 min
    The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi (Part 1): Science Fiction and Politics

    The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi (Part 1): Science Fiction and Politics

    Science Fiction and Politics Class: The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi (Part 1), Courtney Brown, Emory University.

    • 50 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
32 Ratings

32 Ratings

mbwebwe ,

I want go back to school & take this class

I'll keep this short. This is exactly why I read science fiction. It represents my world view and examines "us", possibilities, realities and strips away all the hedging and buffering of "the message". I would love to recommend Kim Stanley Robinson's Red Mars, Green Mars, Blue Mars Trilogy - you could spend a whole semester on the issues in there.

loiseham ,

Emory.

I was pretty shocked by the student’s inability to understand the profs requirements and the subject. It seems no one was ready for what seemed to be an assignment, to find relevant passages and be ready to enter into a discussion. In addition they weren’t able to stay on task with the subject at hand or were so confused that they couldn’t offer related comments or questions.

Emory is noted to be one of the better universities. I would assume that all these students were freshman but even so are they up to the task?

I have to admit that I haven’t read the book but have been reading SF since I was a tween. I could not myself understand the subject as it related to SF and politics. I’m sure the professor had something in mind to tie the subjects together in the future. It seemed more akin to SF and social behavior which maybe in future classes will relate to what we really think of as politics.

rachydee ,

excellent

Do not miss the _Snow Crash_ lectures!

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