524 episodes

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

Science Magazine Podcast Science Magazine

    • Science
    • 4.3 • 723 Ratings

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

    What makes blueberries blue, and myth buster Adam Savage on science communication

    What makes blueberries blue, and myth buster Adam Savage on science communication

    Why squeezing a blueberry doesn’t get you blue juice, and a myth buster and a science editor walk into a bar
     
    First up on the show this week, MythBusters’s Adam Savage chats with Science Editor-in-Chief Holden Thorp about the state of scholarly publishing, better ways to communicate science, plus a few myths Savage still wants to tackle.
     
    Next on the show, making blueberries without blue pigments. Rox Middleton, a postdoctoral fellow at the Dresden University of Technology and honorary research associate at the University of Bristol, joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about how blueberries and other blue fruits owe their hue to a trick of the light caused by specialized wax on their surface.
     
    In a sponsored segment from the Science/AAAS Custom Publishing Office, Erika Berg, director and senior editor of custom publishing, interviews professor Jim Wells about organoid therapies. This segment is sponsored by Cincinnati Children’s Hospital.
     
    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
     
    About the Science Podcast
     
    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Holden Thorp
     
    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.z7ye2st

    • 46 min
    A new kind of magnetism, and how smelly pollution harms pollinators

    A new kind of magnetism, and how smelly pollution harms pollinators

    More than 200 materials could be “altermagnets,” and the impact of odiferous pollutants on nocturnal plant-pollinator interactions
     
    First up on the show this week, researchers investigate a new kind of magnetism. Freelance science journalist Zack Savitsky joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about recent evidence for “altermagnetism” in nature, which could enable new types of electronics.
     
    Next on the show, producer Meagan Cantwell talks with Jeremy Chan, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Naples Federico II, about how air pollution can interfere with pollinator activities—is the modern world too smelly for moths to do their work?
     
    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
     
    About the Science Podcast
     
    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Meagan Cantwell; Zack Savitsky
     
    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.zz09cbu

    • 31 min
    A new way for the heart and brain to ‘talk’ to each other, and Earth’s future weather written in ancient coral reefs

    A new way for the heart and brain to ‘talk’ to each other, and Earth’s future weather written in ancient coral reefs

    A remote island may hold clues for the future of El Niño and La Niña under climate change, and how pressure in the blood sends messages to neurons
     
    First up, researchers are digging into thousands of years of coral to chart El Niño’s behavior over time. Producer Kevin McLean talks with Staff Writer Paul Voosen about his travels to the Pacific island of Vanuatu to witness the arduous task of reef drilling.
     
    Next on the show, host Sarah Crespi talks with Veronica Egger, a professor of neurophysiology at the Regensburg University Institute of Zoology, about an unexpected method of signaling inside the body. Egger’s work suggests the pulse of the blood—the mechanical drumming of it—affects neurons in the brain. The two discuss why this might be a useful way for the body to talk to itself.
     
    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
     
    About the Science Podcast
     
    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Kevin McLean; Paul Voosen
      
    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.z1hqrn2

    • 30 min
    A hangover-fighting enzyme, the failure of a promising snakebite treatment, and how ants change lion behavior

    A hangover-fighting enzyme, the failure of a promising snakebite treatment, and how ants change lion behavior

    On this week’s show: A roundup of stories from our daily newsletter, and the ripple effects of the invasive big-headed ant in Kenya

    First up on the show, Science Newsletter Editor Christie Wilcox joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about snake venom antidotes, a surprising job for a hangover enzyme, and crustaceans that spin silk.
     
    Next on the show, the cascading effects of an invading ant. Douglas Kamaru, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Zoology & Physiology at the University of Wyoming, discusses how the disruption of a mutually beneficial relationship between tiny ants and spiny trees in Kenya led to lions changing their hunting strategies.
     
    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
     
    About the Science Podcast
     
    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Christie Wilcox
     
    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.zd5mbue

    • 28 min
    Paper mills bribe editors to pass peer review, and detecting tumors with a blood draw

    Paper mills bribe editors to pass peer review, and detecting tumors with a blood draw

    Investigation shows journal editors getting paid to publish bunk papers, and new techniques for finding tumor DNA in the blood
     
    First up on this week’s episode, Frederik Joelving, an editor and reporter for the site Retraction Watch, talks with host Sarah Crespi about paper mills—organizations that sell authorship on research papers—that appear to be bribing journal editors to publish bogus articles. They talk about the drivers behind this activity and what publishers can do to stop it.
     
    Next, producer Zakiya Whatley of the Dope Labs podcast talks with researcher Carmen Martin-Alonso, a graduate student in the Harvard–Massachusetts Institute of Technology Program in Health Sciences and Technology, about improving liquid biopsies for cancer. They discuss novel ways to detect tumor DNA circulating in the blood.
     
    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
     
    About the Science Podcast
     
    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Zakiya Whatley; Richard Stone
      
    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.zahpt8h
     
    About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast

    • 36 min
    The environmental toll of war in Ukraine, and communications between mom and fetus during childbirth

    The environmental toll of war in Ukraine, and communications between mom and fetus during childbirth

    Assessing environmental damage during wartime, and tracking signaling between fetus and mother
     
    First up, freelance journalist Richard Stone returns with news from his latest trip to Ukraine. This week, he shares stories with host Sarah Crespi about environmental damage from the war, particularly the grave consequences of the Kakhovka Dam explosion.
     
    Next, producer Kevin McLean talks with researcher Nardhy Gomez-Lopez, a professor in the department of obstetrics and gynecology and pathology and immunology in the Center for Reproductive Health Sciences at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The two discuss signaling between fetus and mother during childbirth and how understanding this crosstalk may one day help predict premature labor.
     
    Finally, in a sponsored segment from the Science/AAAS Custom Publishing Office, Erika Berg, director and senior editor for the Custom Publishing Office, interviews Andrew Pospisilik, chair and professor of epigenetics at the Van Andel Institute, about his research into how epigenetics stabilizes particular gene expression patterns and how those patterns affect our risk for disease. This segment is sponsored by the Van Andel Institute.
     
    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
     
    About the Science Podcast
     
    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Kevin McLean; Rich Stone
     
    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.z5jiifi

    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
723 Ratings

723 Ratings

ASPD1 ,

More time!

Thanks for the show all!
I love having a science news podcast to learn about stuff I hadn’t really thought about
I wish more time was spent on the interviews-they are great topics! For example the latest episode about the cartels, I’d rather have 11 more minutes (or more!) of that interview than to hear about new fall games… seems like conflicting shows to me.

Manny Camps ,

NPR style narration but way more boring

I listen to quite a few science podcasts and this one is by far the most boring one. The presentation of each topic is boring. I want more authentic narration, not the ridiculously animated NPR-Planet Money style of narration

eb ramírez ,

Informative

So easy to follow, awesome topics

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