300 episodes

Seriously is home to the world’s best audio documentaries and podcast recommendations, and host Vanessa Kisuule brings you two fascinating new episodes every week.

Seriously..‪.‬ BBC Radio 4

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.3 • 257 Ratings

Seriously is home to the world’s best audio documentaries and podcast recommendations, and host Vanessa Kisuule brings you two fascinating new episodes every week.

    Who Do You Really Think You Are?

    Who Do You Really Think You Are?

    We’re a nation obsessed with genealogy. Millions of us are gripped by TV shows like 'Who Do You Think You Are', where genealogists show celebrities their famous ancestors - like Danny Dyer being descended from Edward III, the first Plantagent King! But what if Danny doesn’t get exclusive bragging rights? With the help of mathematician Hannah Fry and Habsburg Royal Historian professor Martyn Rady, population geneticist Dr Adam Rutherford sets out to prove that we're all descended from royalty, revealing along the way that family trees are not the perfect tool for tracing your heritage. But can it really be true? Can we all be descended from Henry VIII or Charlemagne!?

    • 28 min
    Prosecuting Polmont

    Prosecuting Polmont

    In 2018, within a few months of each other, Katie Allan and William Lindsay took their own lives at Polmont Young Offenders Institution in Scotland. There have been nine suicides at Polmont since 2012 and the overall suicide rate in Scottish prisons is at a record high.
    Katie's mum Linda believes many of these deaths were avoidable. She was told by the Crown Office that there were sufficient grounds for prosecuting the Scottish Prison Service for potential failures of duty of care to both Katie and William, but they couldn't proceed because, unlike the police, the NHS, or even a private prison, the prison service has immunity from prosecution.
    With a Fatal Accident Inquiry about to open into Katie and William's deaths, Linda has little faith it will hold the prison accountable.
    Dani Garavelli Presenter and Researcher
    Liza Greig Producer
    Elizabeth Clark Executive Producer
    BBC Scotland Productions for BBC Radio 4

    • 28 min
    How to Read the News - Episode 1

    How to Read the News - Episode 1

    When journalists tell stories, they rarely start at the beginning but instead with the latest development. Context comes towards the end. It’s called the ‘inverted pyramid’.
    When scandal at the Confederation of British Industry hit the newspapers and boss Tony Danker was dismissed, he complained that articles didn’t state right at the start that he was not accused of the worst misconduct. If you didn’t make it much past the headlines, you might not realise that.

    We discover why journalists write stories ‘the wrong way up’, how that affects how we understand them, and how that might change with new technology.
    ‘How to Read the News’ - this series is all about giving you the tools to decode the news.
    Presenter: Jo Fidgen
    Producer: Charlotte McDonald
    Researchers: Beth Ashmead Latham, Kirsteen Knight
    Editors: China Collins, Emma Rippon

    • 14 min
    Graceland in the Glens

    Graceland in the Glens

    In 2019, Elvis Presley Enterprises threatened to deconstruct Graceland and move it to Saudi Arabia, Tokyo, or whoever was the highest bidder. Artist, writer, KLF member and money burner - Bill Drummond - realised something had to be done. Bill's relationship with Northern Ireland began before his relationship with Elvis - but at some junction, these two relationships were bound to collide. It seems the Curfew Tower at the junction of the crossroads in the village of Cushendall in the Glens of Antrim is where this collision will be taking place.
    Producer: Conor Garrett

    • 28 min
    The Screening Dilemma

    The Screening Dilemma

    Ronnie Helvy is on his way for a screening test. He's in his sixties and wants an assessment to check for a variety of cancers. He isn't currently displaying any symptoms but is seeking reassurance. His blood will undergo a series of tests in exchange for over a thousand pounds. The outcome might be able to determine whether he is susceptible to cancers that some of his family have died from. It sounds like a good thing. Or is it?
    Advances in health screening have allowed us to see far into our bodies' future. During the pandemic home testing became an everyday routine. The same technology has helped develop new tools that can sequence our DNA quickly. Simple tests are making the process less intrusive than ever before.
    These improvements have also seen the development of a number of major national screening programmes. Including Our Future Health and the UK Biobank. Both of these are large scale research studies to help researchers prevent chronic health conditions. They could also inform the NHS on how to implement generalised screening across more of the population.
    Private health clinics are also offering health check-ups -- tests that could spot future warning signs. Home-testing kits can be ordered from the internet. But what does this information tell us? And is it information we can trust? We look at whether the private industry is acting responsibly when it comes to genetic testing.
    The BBC's Health Correspondent Matthew Hill finds out whether screening programmes can really help us live both better and longer lives. And he asks: can diagnosing conditions decades before they might affect us cause more harm than good?
    The promise of diagnosing conditions early is an exciting one. But there are fears among some health professionals that more screening might not be entirely helpful.
    We take a look at what lessons from the past could tell us about the current surge in screening. And we consider some of the dilemmas it might present us with.
    Presenter: Matthew Hill
    Producer: Robbie Wojciechowski
    Editor: Richard Collings
    Contributors:
    Dr Paul Cornes, Oncologist and International Advisor on cancer
    Prof. Clare Turnbull, Division of Genetics and Epidemiology at the Institute of Cancer Research
    Helen Wallace, Deputy Director of GeneWatch UK
    Prof Sir John Bell, Regius Professor of Medicine at the University of Oxford and the UK’s Life Sciences Champion

    • 28 min
    Hotel Room Art

    Hotel Room Art

    The inside story of art in hotel rooms - and why hoteliers think it's so important to get it right. Ian McMillan has always been fascinated by the artworks he finds on his travels. Here he encounters mass produced flowers, abstract excitement and ancient artefacts. In three very different hotel bedrooms he meets curators, designers and artists - but most importantly he meets the art, and asks why we have ‘art’ hotels .

    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
257 Ratings

257 Ratings

arrrrrrrghh! ,

In general, great content

In general, a surprising podcast with great, diverse material. There are only two weaknesses to the program:

(1) The host--who never speaks for more than 45 seconds--is infuriatingly banal. Don't let her ruin the podcast for you.

(2) Some episodes are bad. They are few and you know them right away when you see the title. If the episode has anything to do with social media, futurism, or technology, it will be banal Twitter-level discourse, voiced by a brain-dead tech-triumphalist spouting tired bromides.

These two things said, this is an almost consistently excellent podcast, notwithstanding the soul-crushing stupidity of the host and the occasional contributor.

HarborGabby ,

A big proud cry

Once the folks at Cardiff Pride started speaking, the tears flowed! “I’m proud on the inside” - the most beautiful statement I have ever heard. Thank you!

eightyanthony ,

.omg im sorry

I wrote a one star review for “connor explains” by accident. I like ur show!

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