300 episodes

New research on how society works

Thinking Allowed BBC

    • Science
    • 4.4 • 253 Ratings

New research on how society works

    Covid

    Covid

    Covid: Laurie Taylor explores the financial impact of the coronavirus & asks if it represents an opportunity, as well as a crisis. He's joined by Lisa Suckert, Senior Researcher at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies in Cologne, whose recent study examines the way in which the pandemic has disrupted our sense of time and the temporal logic of the capitalist economy. Also, Adam Tooze, Shelby Cullom Davis chair of History at Columbia University, considers the shockwaves unleashed by the shutdown of the global economy. Will they yield any positive changes to our way of life?

    Producer: Jayne Egerton

    • 28 min
    Freedom

    Freedom

    Freedom: Laurie Taylor explores an unruly & disputed concept. Annelien de Dijn, Professor of Modern Political History at Utrecht University, asks how it came to be identified with limited government. Does our view of freedom owe more to the enemies of democracy than the liberty lovers of the Age of Revolution? Also, Tyler Stovall, Professor of History at Fordham University, considers the intertwined histories of racism and freedom in the United States, a nation that has claimed liberty as at the heart of their national identity.

    Producer: Jayne Egerton

    • 28 min
    Love and Romance

    Love and Romance

    LOVE & ROMANCE – Laurie Taylor unpacks different conceptions of love. He’s joined by Raksha Pande, Senior Lecturer in Social Geography at Newcastle University, whose latest research explores arranged marriages amongst people in the British-Indian diaspora. She finds that they have skilfully adapted cultural norms to carve out an identity narrative that portrays them as modern migrants offering a different take on romantic love. She’s joined by Eva Illouz, Rose Isaac Chair of Sociology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, who considers the ways in which romantic affairs in Western culture fail to spark or break up. What can ‘the end of love’ tell us about the effects of consumer culture on personal relationships?

    Producer: Jayne Egerton

    • 28 min
    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan

    Afghanistan: The lives of Afghans in Britain today and the role of corruption in the return of the Taliban. Laurie Taylor talks to Nichola Khan, Reader in Anthropology and Psychology at the University of Brighton, about her monumental study of Afghan migrants in Sussex, England, at a time when we are seeing a fresh wave of migration from their home country. Also, Sarah Chayes, former Senior Associate in the Democracy and Rule of Law Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, explores the role of political corruption in the renewed ascendency of the Taliban.

    Producer: Jayne Egerton

    • 28 min
    Office Life

    Office Life

    Office life: As more people return to the conventional workplace, Laurie Taylor talks to Craig Robertson, Associate Professor of Media Studies at Northeastern University, about a new study which charts the ‘vertical’ history of the filing cabinet and its role in capitalist modernity. Why was it advertised alongside gleaming skyscrapers & how did the logic of the cabinet come to penetrate the domestic sphere? Also, Harriet Shortt, Associate Professor in Organisation Studies at UWE, Bristol, considers the ways in which people deploy private possessions, from toys to photos, to personalise their increasingly sanitised working environments. Has Covid changed our relationship to such objects at work, as Zoom meetings have blurred the private and professional allowing us to enter our colleagues homes?

    Producer: Jayne Egerton

    • 28 min
    Cool Consumers

    Cool Consumers

    Cool Consumers: Laurie Taylor considers how music acquires the social connotations of “cool” & its implicit association with youth and outsider status. He's joined by Jo Haynes, Associate Professor in Sociology at the University of Bristol. Also, the way in which racial marketing promoted menthol cigarettes to African Americans, linking them to notions of ‘cool’, with enduringly harmful effect. Keith Wailoo, Professor of History and Public Affairs at Princeton University, unpacks a poignant and intricate story which reveals why 85% of Black smokers prefer menthol brands and how difficult it has been to ban them, not least because of the way that tobacco companies forged deep connections with Black media publishers and civil rights campaigners. He argues that the cry of 'I can't breathe' has multiple meanings in America's painful racial history.

    Producer: Jayne Egerton

    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
253 Ratings

253 Ratings

Entropyman ,

Terrific - informative and fun

Laurie must be a wonderful teacher. He has a good sense of humor but more important he discusses topics in a way that offers a fresh perspective. History and sociology are combined with music to make episodes memorable. The recent episodes on CoVid and Freedom were intriguing. I hope he continues his podcast.

Cozzum ,

A Half Hour of Interesting Sociological Content

Presenter Laurie Taylor takes up needle and thread to weave a tapestry of reflections on the diverse states of human affairs. The various strands of thought provoking material consist of insightful guests discussing their studies and resulting papers or books, while Laurie guides the conversation with questions eliciting the most colorful and textured responses designed to give us a better view of the big picture.

His jovial personality adds a friendly and comforting level of uplift to what can often be challenging ideas, behaviours, and incidents from history or the present day. Sometimes the musical interludes and humorous takes on aspects of our world that Laurie employs can be just the right touch to regain a little balance and perhaps harmony to our thinking, which is very much allowed and appreciated.

The artful crafting of episodes also helps inspire me to prepare better meals as I am often cooking while listening to the program. I've never cooked better food than while listening to Thinking Allowed. Thanks for all the great programs Laurie Taylor and Thinking Allowed Crew, nicely done.

tinu ,

Marvelous Podcast!

Huge thanks to the host and to the BBC and other partners that make this truly marvelous podcast happen.

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