128 episodes

The student-led Stanford Psychology Podcast invites leading psychologists to talk about what’s on their mind lately. Join Eric Neumann, Anjie Cao, Kate Petrova, Bella Fascendini,  Joseph Outa and Julia Rathmann-Bloch as they chat with their guests about their latest exciting work. Every week, an episode will bring you new findings from psychological science and how they can be applied to everyday life. The opinions and views expressed in this podcast represent those of the speaker and not necessarily Stanford's. Subscribe at stanfordpsypod.substack.com. Let us hear your thoughts at stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com. Follow us on Twitter @StanfordPsyPod. Visit our website https://stanfordpsychologypodcast.com. Soundtrack: Corey Zhou (UCSD). Logo: Sarah Wu (Stanford)

Stanford Psychology Podcast Stanford Psychology

    • Science
    • 4.4 • 61 Ratings

The student-led Stanford Psychology Podcast invites leading psychologists to talk about what’s on their mind lately. Join Eric Neumann, Anjie Cao, Kate Petrova, Bella Fascendini,  Joseph Outa and Julia Rathmann-Bloch as they chat with their guests about their latest exciting work. Every week, an episode will bring you new findings from psychological science and how they can be applied to everyday life. The opinions and views expressed in this podcast represent those of the speaker and not necessarily Stanford's. Subscribe at stanfordpsypod.substack.com. Let us hear your thoughts at stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com. Follow us on Twitter @StanfordPsyPod. Visit our website https://stanfordpsychologypodcast.com. Soundtrack: Corey Zhou (UCSD). Logo: Sarah Wu (Stanford)

    127 - Guilherme Lichand: Remote Learning Repercussions

    127 - Guilherme Lichand: Remote Learning Repercussions

    Anjie chats with Dr. Guilherme Lichand. Guilherme is an assistant professor at the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University, and a co-Director at the Stanford Lemann Center. His research interest explores the sources of education inequities in the global south, and in interventions with the potential to overturn them. In this episode, Guilherme talks about his recent paper titled “The Lasting Impacts of Remote Learning in the Absence of Remedial Policies: Evidence from Brazil”. He shares his insights on how remote learning could have negative, long-term impacts on the learning outcomes, especially in places without high quality access to the facilities required by remote learning. He also shares his thoughts on whether the same patterns could generalize to remote work – that is, does work from home have negative impacts on our productivity. 
     If you found this episode interesting at all, subscribe on our Substack and consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.
     
    Guilherme’s paper: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=4209299
    Guilherme’s personal website:https://lichand.info/
     Anjie’s: website: anjiecao.github.io
    Anjie’s Twitter @anjie_cao
     
    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod
    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/
    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com

    • 45 min
    126 - Michele Gelfand: Culture and Conflict

    126 - Michele Gelfand: Culture and Conflict

    Eric chats with Michele Gelfand, Professor of Organizational Behavior at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. Michele’s culture lab studies the strength of cultural norms, negotiation, conflict, revenge, forgiveness, and diversity, drawing on many different disciplines. Michele is world-renowned for her work on how some cultures have stronger enforcement of norms (tight cultures), while others are more tolerant of deviations from the norm (loose cultures). She is the author of Rule Makers, Rule Breakers.
    In this chat, Eric and Michele discuss the latest insights into loose and tight cultures, what academic disciplines are tight versus loose, and how this framework explains phenomena as disconnected as Covid fears, the appeal of populist leaders, and why Ernie and Bert have so many disagreements. Michele then shares how she stays so passionate and productive, the barriers she has faced trying to be so interdisciplinary, how she deals with setbacks, and why she sometimes dresses up as a pickle.

    JOIN OUR SUBSTACK! Stay up to date with the pod and become part of the ever-growing community :) https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    If you found this episode interesting at all, consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.
    Links
    Book: https://www.michelegelfand.com/rule-makers-rule-breakers
    How tight or loose are you? https://www.michelegelfand.com/tl-quiz
    Tight vs loose cultures: https://www.science.org/doi/abs/10.1126/science.1197754?casa_token=P4iNAMuyYeQAAAAA:gyWMq9sohJJ0LsH-bBRg844OqN8-e9AwiVb649lkXe8cXzCP5jcSmqtAojp-1Lfvg5itKyD2nPP8J4g
    Culture, threat, tightness and looseness: https://www.pnas.org/doi/abs/10.1073/pnas.2113891119

    Eric's website

    Eric's Twitter @EricNeumannPsy

    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod

    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/

    Let us know what you think of this episode, or of the podcast! :) stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com

    • 50 min
    125 - Marginalia Episode: Cristina Salvador on Cultural Psychology in Latin America

    125 - Marginalia Episode: Cristina Salvador on Cultural Psychology in Latin America

    Marginalia Episode is a collaboration between Stanford Psychology Podcast and Marginalia Science, a community committed to including, integrating, advocating for, and promoting members who are not typically promoted by the status quo in academia. In each Marginalia Episode, we feature a guest who has been featured in the Marginalia Science Monthly Newsletter. In this episode, Anjie chats with Dr. Cristina Salvador, an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. Cristina examines how culture interfaces with biology to influence our thinking, feeling, and behavior. She analyzes the influence of culture at multiple levels, including the brain, everyday language use, implicit measures, and big data. In this episode, we start our conversation on her recent paper titled “Emotionally expressive interdependence in Latin America: Triangulating through a comparison of three cultural zones.”. To learn more about Cristina, you can read the Marginalia Science Newsletter attached below. 


    Episode on Marginalia Science: https://www.stanfordpsychologypodcast.com/episodes/episode/7927b876/104-special-episode-marginalia-science
    Marginalia Newsletter featuring Cristina:https://marginaliascience.substack.com/p/newsletter-september-2023


    Cristina’s paper; https://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/2024-15733-001.pdf
    Cristina’s lab website:https://sites.duke.edu/culturelab/ 
    Crstina’s twitter: @cris_esalvador


    Anjie’s: website: anjiecao.github.io
    Anjie’s Twitter @anjie_cao



    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod
    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/
    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com

    • 36 min
    124 - Oriel FeldmanHall: Punishment, Forgiveness, and Predicting Emotions

    124 - Oriel FeldmanHall: Punishment, Forgiveness, and Predicting Emotions

    This week, Rachel chats with Oriel FeldmanHall,  Professor of Cognitive, Linguistics, and Psychological Sciences at Brown University. Oriel's lab leverages methods from behavioral economics, social psychology, and neuroscience to explore the neural bases of social behavior, and the role of emotion in shaping social interactions. She has won numerous awards, including the Cognitive Neuroscience Society’s Young Investigator Award for outstanding contributions to science, the Association for Psychological Science’s Janet Taylor Spence Award for Transformative Early Career Contributions, and the American Psychological Association’s Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology. 
    In this episode, Oriel provides an introduction to the world of affective science, explaining how her team measures and studies emotion. She describes how the emotions that we expect to feel—and the inaccuracies in our predictions—shape our judgments and behavior, and the complex relationship between emotion and depression. We also discuss the hazards of sharing scientific findings on twitter, and how some of the best research questions originate in coffee shops.
     
     JOIN OUR SUBSTACK! Stay up-to-date with the podcast and become part of the ever-growing community 🙂 https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/
     If you found this episode interesting, please consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a minute but will allow us to reach more listeners and make them excited about psychology.
     
     Links:
     Link to the paper we discussed
    Check out more of Professor Oriel FeldmanHall's work at the FeldmanHall lab website! 
    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod
    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/ 
    Let us know what you think of this episode or of the podcast by sending us an email at stanfordpsychologypodcast@gmail.com

    • 29 min
    123 - Jacqueline Gottlieb: Are You Curious About Curiosity?

    123 - Jacqueline Gottlieb: Are You Curious About Curiosity?

    This week, Julia chats with Jacqueline Gottlieb, Professor of Neuroscience in the Kavli Institute for Brain Science and the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Institute for Mind, Brain, and Behavior at Columbia University in New York. Since joining the Columbia Faculty in 2001, she has spearheaded pioneering research on the neural mechanisms of attention and curiosity, using computational modeling combined with behavioral and neurophysiological studies in humans and non-human primates. 


    In this episode, Professor Gottlieb unlocks the fundamental forces governing curiosity. She begins by explaining the ambiguity inherent in uncertainty and the balance between potential risks and rewards. Then, she reviews a recent study that suggests that we don’t always reason optimally about uncertainty. After discussing potential reasons why we might struggle with decision making surrounding uncertainty, she highlights key personality factors from the study that were associated with more successful decision making. Finally, she closes by sharing her hopes for the future of the field.


    JOIN OUR SUBSTACK! Stay up-to-date with the podcast and become part of the ever-growing community 🙂 https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/ 
    If you found this episode interesting, please consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a minute but will allow us to reach more listeners and make them excited about psychology.


    Links:
    Link to the paper we discussed
    Check out more of Professor Gottlieb’s work at her lab website! 


    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod
    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/ 
    Let us know what you think of this episode or of the podcast by sending us an email at stanfordpsychologypodcast@gmail.com

    • 1 hr
    122 - Michal Kosinski: Studying Theory of Mind and Reasoning in LLMs.

    122 - Michal Kosinski: Studying Theory of Mind and Reasoning in LLMs.

    Xi Jia chats with Dr. Michal Kosinski, an Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business. Michal's research interests recently encompass both human and artificial cognition. Currently, his work centers on examining the psychological processes in Large Language Models (LLMs), and leveraging Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning (ML), Big Data, and computational techniques to model and predict human behavior.

    In this episode, they chat about Michal's recent works: "Theory of Mind Might Have Spontaneously Emerged in Large Language Models" and "Human-like intuitive behavior and reasoning biases emerged in large language models but disappeared in ChatGPT". Michal also shared his scientific journey and some personal suggestions for PhD students.

    If you found this episode interesting at all, subscribe on our Substack and consider leaving us a good rating! It just takes a second but will allow us to reach more people and make them excited about psychology.
    Michal's paper on Theory of Mind in LLMs: https://arxiv.org/abs/2302.02083
    Michal's paper on reasoning bias in LLMs: https://www.nature.com/articles/s43588-023-00527-x

    Michal's personal website: https://www.michalkosinski.com/


    Xi Jia's profile: https://profiles.stanford.edu/xijia-zhou
    Xi Jia's Twitter/X: https://twitter.com/LauraXijiaZhou


    Podcast Twitter @StanfordPsyPod
    Podcast Substack https://stanfordpsypod.substack.com/


    Let us know what you thought of this episode, or of the podcast! :) stanfordpsychpodcast@gmail.com

    • 1 hr 8 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
61 Ratings

61 Ratings

thisisrhenickbame ,

119 Bryan Brown

“Never replace in-school education.” “The humanity of me as a teacher understanding the needs of my students is going to be the hardest thing to replicate… I can now provide my students a microscopic understanding of a phenomenon.”
“Idea first, language second.” My heart leaped throughout this podcast. Professor Brown speaks to balance, insight and understanding. Thank you.

Freddyflinstone9752 ,

Great show

Interesting guests, irreverent host.

pb&j sammie ,

real knowledge + wisdom, engaging, life-relevant

I found you via episode 69- in a word, fabulous (truly the right word, by the way).

The professor is actuallu genial (and I use that word so infrequently), because he really embodies cross disciplinary and profound perspectives and knowledge as well as a sensitivity, nuance and humor that characterizes real intelligence and he in no way exudes that arid, merely cerebral accademia-speak that for me often betrays a lack of deeper, life-relevant, humanizing knowledge.

The interviewer is equally expressive of those wonderful qualities of curiosity, vulnerability, and thirst for knowledge while integrating the personal quest for locating oneself in the world end finding wisdom. That's what's so strong about this episode and both of its interlocutors: they play with, explore, and share real conversation that embodies those lovely qualities and is therefore both exceptionally engaging as well as both intellectually and personally/spiritually enriching and relevant.

Thank you for existing as a group and a project, and for sharing this podcast as a creative work which is a gift.

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