107 episodes

A Podcast on Antebellum America (ca.1815 - ca.1845) hosted by Daniel N. Gullotta and sponsored by Andrew Jackson's Heritage​.

The Age of Jackson Podcast Daniel Gullotta

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.6, 141 Ratings

A Podcast on Antebellum America (ca.1815 - ca.1845) hosted by Daniel N. Gullotta and sponsored by Andrew Jackson's Heritage​.

    106 Merrill D. Peterson's The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun (1988) with James Bradley (History of History 20)

    106 Merrill D. Peterson's The Great Triumvirate: Webster, Clay, and Calhoun (1988) with James Bradley (History of History 20)

    Enormously powerful, intensely ambitious, the very personifications of their respective regions--Daniel Webster, Henry Clay, and John C. Calhoun represented the foremost statemen of their age. In the decades preceding the Civil War, they dominated American congressional politics as no other figures have. Now Merrill D. Peterson, one of our most gifted historians, brilliantly re-creates the lives and times of these great men in this monumental collective biography.

    Arriving on the national scene at the onset of the War of 1812 and departing political life during the ordeal of the Union in 1850-52, Webster, Clay, and Calhoun opened--and closed--a new era in American politics. In outlook and style, they represented startling contrasts: Webster, the Federalist and staunch New England defender of the Union; Clay, the "war hawk" and National Rebublican leader from the West; Calhoun, the youthful nationalist who became the foremost spokesman of the South and slavery. They came together in the Senate for the first time in 1832, united in their opposition of Andrew Jackson, and thus gave birth to the idea of the "Great Triumvirate." Entering the history books, this idea survived the test of time because these men divided so much of American politics between them for so long.

    Peterson brings to life the great events in which the Triumvirate figured so prominently, including the debates on Clay's American System, the Missouri Compromise, the Webster-Hayne debate, the Bank War, the Webster-Ashburton Treaty, the annexation of Texas, and the Compromise of 1850. At once a sweeping narrative and a penetrating study of non-presidential leadership, this book offers an indelible picture of this conservative era in which statesmen viewed the preservation of the legacy of free government inherited from the Founding Fathers as their principal mission. In fascinating detail, Peterson demonstrates how precisely Webster, Clay, and Calhoun exemplify three facets of this national mind.
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    James Bradley holds an M.A. in history from New York University, has been a journalist and editor for more than 20 years, contributing to The Village Voice, The New York Observer, and New York Newsday, among other publications. He has been an editor at Time Inc. since 1998. For five years, he was the senior project editor of The Encyclopedia of New York City, published by Yale University Press, now in its second edition. Bradley is currently under contract with Oxford University Press to complete a biography of Van Buren. He has a home in the Hudson Valley and often visits the Van Buren National Historic Site in Kinderhook to do research.

    • 1 hr 6 min
    105 Tariff Wars and the Politics of Jacksonian America with William K. Bolt

    105 Tariff Wars and the Politics of Jacksonian America with William K. Bolt

    Before the Civil War, the American people did not have to worry about a federal tax collector coming to their door. The reason why was the tariff, taxing foreign goods and imports on arrival in the United States. Tariff Wars and the Politics of Jacksonian America attempts to show why the tariff was an important part of the national narrative in the antebellum period. The debates in Congress over the tariff were acrimonious, with pitched arguments between politicians, interest groups, newspapers, and a broader electorate.

    The spreading of democracy caused by the tariff evoked bitter sectional controversy among Americans. Northerners claimed they needed a tariff to protect their industries and also their wages. Southerners alleged the tariff forced them to buy goods at increased prices. Having lost the argument against the tariff on its merits, in the 1820s, southerners began to argue the Constitution did not allow Congress to enact a protective tariff. In this fight, we see increased tensions between northerners and southerners in the decades before the Civil War began.

    As Tariff Wars reveals, this struggle spawned a controversy that placed the nation on a path that would lead to the early morning hours of Charleston Harbor in April of 1861.
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    William K. Bolt is Assistant Professor of History at Francis Marion University and former assistant editor on the James K. Polk Project.

    • 1 hr 4 min
    104 Church-State Relations in the Early American Republic with James S. Kabala

    104 Church-State Relations in the Early American Republic with James S. Kabala

    Americans of the Early Republic devoted close attention to the question of what should be the proper relationship between church and state. This issue engaged participants from all religions, denominations and party affiliations. Kabala examines this debate across six decades and shows that an understanding of this period is not possible without appreciating the key role religion played in the formation of the nation.
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    James S. Kabala received his Ph.D. in History from Brown University. He is an adjunct professor at Rhode Island College and Community College of Rhode Island.

    • 1 hr 4 min
    103 White Women as Slave Owners in the American South with Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers

    103 White Women as Slave Owners in the American South with Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers

    Bridging women’s history, the history of the South, and African American history, this book makes a bold argument about the role of white women in American slavery. Historian Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers draws on a variety of sources to show that slave-owning women were sophisticated economic actors who directly engaged in and benefited from the South’s slave market. Because women typically inherited more slaves than land, enslaved people were often their primary source of wealth. Not only did white women often refuse to cede ownership of their slaves to their husbands, they employed management techniques that were as effective and brutal as those used by slave-owning men. White women actively participated in the slave market, profited from it, and used it for economic and social empowerment. By examining the economically entangled lives of enslaved people and slave-owning women, Jones-Rogers presents a narrative that forces us to rethink the economics and social conventions of slaveholding America.
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    Stephanie E. Jones-Rogers is associate professor of history at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the winner of the 2013 Lerner-Scott Prize for best doctoral dissertation in U.S. women’s history.

    • 1 hr 10 min
    102 European Nationalist Movements and the Creation of the Confederacy with Ann L. Tucker

    102 European Nationalist Movements and the Creation of the Confederacy with Ann L. Tucker

    From the earliest stirrings of southern nationalism to the defeat of the Confederacy, analysis of European nationalist movements played a critical role in how southerners thought about their new southern nation. Southerners argued that because the Confederate nation was cast in the same mold as its European counterparts, it deserved independence. In Newest Born of Nations, Ann Tucker utilizes print sources such as newspapers and magazines to reveal how elite white southerners developed an international perspective on nationhood that helped them clarify their own national values, conceive of the South as distinct from the North, and ultimately define and legitimize the Confederacy.

    While popular at home, claims to equivalency with European nations failed to resonate with Europeans and northerners, who viewed slavery as incompatible with liberal nationalism. Forced to reevaluate their claims about the international place of southern nationalism, some southerners redoubled their attempts to place the Confederacy within the broader trends of nineteenth-century nationalism. More conservative southerners took a different tack, emphasizing the distinctiveness of their nationalism, claiming that the Confederacy actually purified nationalism through slavery. Southern Unionists likewise internationalized their case for national unity. By examining the evolution of and variation within these international perspectives, Tucker reveals the making of a southern nationhood to be a complex, contested process.
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    Ann L. Tucker is an assistant professor of history at the University of North Georgia. She earned her BA at Wake Forest University and MA and Ph.D. at the University of South Carolina. Dr. Tucker’s areas of expertise include the Civil War era and US South, which she approaches through a transnational perspective. She is interested in questions of southern identity and international influences; in particular, she wants to know how events in Europe helped shape southern identity in the Civil War era. Her first book is Newest Born of Nations: European Nationalist Movements and the Creation of the Confederacy. You can follow her on Twitter, @AnnLTucker.

    • 52 min
    101 Christine Stansell's City of Women: Sex and Class in New York, 1789-1860 (1986) with Anne Twitty (History of History 19)

    101 Christine Stansell's City of Women: Sex and Class in New York, 1789-1860 (1986) with Anne Twitty (History of History 19)

    Before the Civil War, a new idea of womanhood took shape in America in general and in the Northeast in particular. Women of the propertied classes assumed the mantle of moral guardians of their families and the nation. Laboring women, by contrast, continued to suffer from the oppressions of sex and class. In fact, their very existence troubled their more prosperous sisters, for the impoverished female worker violated dearly held genteel precepts of 'woman's nature' and 'woman's place.' City of Women delves into the misfortunes that New York City's laboring women suffered and the problems that resulted. Looking at how and why a community of women workers came into existence, Christine Stansell analyzes the social conflicts surrounding laboring women and the social pressure these conflicts brought to bear on others. The result is a fascinating journey into economic relations and cultural forms that influenced working women's lives—one that reveals, at last, the female city concealed within America's first great metropolis.

    Christine Stansell writes about the social, sexual, and cultural history of American women and gender relations. Her most recent book, American Moderns: Bohemian New York and the Creation of a New Century, follows an influential group of writers, artists, and political radicals from 1890 to 1920. Stansell’s first book, City of Women: Sex and Class in New York, 1789-1860, reveals the central role that working-class women played in the city’s history. She worked in the new field of the history of sexuality, collaborating with Ann Snitow and Sharon Thompson to publish Powers of Desire; The Politics of Sexuality. She has received fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Institute for Advanced Study, and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study.
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    Anne Twitty is an Associate Professor of History & Chair of the Undergraduate Committee at the University of Mississippi. Broadly defined, Professor Twitty’s research focuses on questions of nineteenth-century American social and cultural history, with a special emphasis on legal and labor history, slavery and freedom, gender and women’s history, and the history of the South and Midwest. She joined the faculty at the University of Mississippi in the fall of 2010 after completing her bachelor’s degree in political science at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. and her master’s and doctoral degrees in history at Princeton University. Her first book, Before Dred Scott: Slavery and Legal Culture in the American Confluence, 1787-1857, was published by Cambridge University Press in 2016. You can follow her on Twitter: @ProfessorTwitty.

    • 1 hr 18 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
141 Ratings

141 Ratings

Zendude2664 ,

Wonderful - One of the Best!!

The host is a pro and the guests are the cream of the crop.

And get this, first class pod production values. Way too much content in this space suffers from weak interviewers and/or horrible prod values. It’s not that hard to prevent mic pop, background noise and non equalization kiddos.

First rate! Congrats on the work and keep it up.

The Ostler interview was great.

Status Crime ,

Excellent look at American history

This podcast is a great way to learn more about American history. Each episode is an interview with an author who wrote a book based in the age of Jackson 1812-1859. They’re mostly historians, but not always. Gullata’s Questions are always insightful, intuitive, and allow The listener to get a much clearer picture of People living in this Time. A Great interviewer And wonderful host.

Zach ETSU Alumni ,

Amazing Quality

As a graduate student studying the Antebellum and Civil War eras at ETSU, I can’t stress enough how top notch the quality is for this podcast. The host always brings in a renowned historian usually with a PhD in the subject. Ignore some of the poor reviews on here talking about political bias.

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