300 episodes

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • News & Politics
    • 4.6, 38.5K Ratings

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
38.5K Ratings

38.5K Ratings

champ0255 ,

Best way to start my day

I love starting my day with The Daily. I feel informed of current events and I love the approach the journalists take to understand multiple perspectives in a given scenario. The conversation always had a logical flow and topics are broken down for everyday people to understand. Every time I have a question in my head, the next thing to happen is Michael breaking down the information to clarify or reiterate. It’s like he’s reading my mind. Really well done!

Joy forthright ,

Average

Extremely left-leaning bias. The episodes leave out a lot of key information and rely on emotional arguments.

nsmythej ,

On immigration

I’m a legal alien here in the US, and from a developing country (to which I intend to return). I am sympathetic to immigrants, documented or not, but I did not find the episode on the immigration raids compelling. I cannot understand why there is no attempt to take a deeper look at the causes of immigration, and the ways in which US foreign policy has directly contributed to destabilization in many of the countries from which immigrants come. The political and economic issues in Central America are a direct result of US intervention in the region over decades. The US cannot now expect to wash its hands clean, the US government bears a great deal of responsibility for the conditions that push people to leave their countries. What’s more, much of the prosperity enjoyed in the US was secured through the exploitation (through unfair trade agreements, the abuse of multinational corporations, structural adjustment policies, and more direct political interference from the CIA etc) that such destabilization made possible. The US’s fancy supermarkets are built on the backs of many, many people within and without this nation. A serious consideration of some of that background needs to be a part of the conversation. This kind of short-sighted sob story is besides the point, this issue does not require an emotional appeal, it needs a reckoning w history.

Top Podcasts In News & Politics

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by The New York Times