1,641 episodes

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro and Sabrina Tavernise. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • News
    • 4.4 • 87.6K Ratings

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro and Sabrina Tavernise. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    Florida After Hurricane Ian

    Florida After Hurricane Ian

    As the sun came up over Florida yesterday, a fuller picture began to emerge of the destruction that Hurricane Ian had inflicted on the state and its residents.

    The Category 4 storm washed away roads, bridges, cars, boats and homes. The damage is so extensive that, according to the state’s governor, Ron DeSantis, it may take years to rebuild.

    Guests: Patricia Mazzei, the Miami bureau chief for The New York Times; Richard Fausset, a Times correspondent based in Atlanta; Nicholas Bogel-Burroughs, a national news reporter for The Times; and Hilary Swift, a photojournalist.

    • 31 min
    One Man Flees Putin’s Draft

    One Man Flees Putin’s Draft

    Kirill, 24, works at a nonprofit for homeless people in the Moscow region. He does not support the policies of President Vladimir V. Putin and is vehemently against the invasion of Ukraine.

    After suffering setbacks in the war, Mr. Putin announced a military draft a week ago. Kirill was among those called up. As he hides out to avoid being served his papers, Kirill spoke to Sabrina Tavernise about how his life has changed.

    Guest: Kirill, a 24-year-old from Moscow who is attempting to avoid the draft and who asked that only his first name be used to avoid reprisals.

    • 38 min
    An Iranian Uprising Led By Women

    An Iranian Uprising Led By Women

    Mahsa Amini, 22, traveled from her hometown in the province of Kurdistan to the Iranian capital, Tehran, this month. Emerging from the subway, she was arrested for failing to cover her hair modestly enough. Three days later, she was dead.

    The anger over Ms. Amini’s death has prompted days of rage, exhilaration and street battles across Iran, with women stripping off their head scarves — and even burning them — in the most significant outpouring of dissent against the ruling system in more than a decade.

    Guest: Farnaz Fassihi, a reporter for The New York Times.

    • 29 min
    The Great Pandemic Theft

    The Great Pandemic Theft

    During the pandemic, an enormous amount of money — about $5 trillion in total — was spent to help support the newly unemployed and to prop up the U.S. economy while it was forced into suspension.

    But the funds came with few strings and minimal oversight. The result: one of the largest frauds in American history, with billions of dollars stolen by thousands of people.

    Guest: David A. Fahrenthold, an investigative reporter for The New York Times, focused on nonprofits.

    • 31 min
    Why Fewer American Children Are Living in Poverty

    Why Fewer American Children Are Living in Poverty

    The high poverty rate among children was long seen as an enduring fact of American life. But a recent analysis has shown that the number of young people growing up poor has fallen dramatically in the past few decades.

    The reasons for the improvement are complicated, but they have their roots in a network of programs and support shaped by years of political conflict and compromise.

    Guest: Jason DeParle, a senior writer at The New York Times and a frequent contributor to The New York Times Magazine.

    • 27 min
    The Sunday Read: ‘The Quest by Circadian Medicine to Make the Most of Our Body Clocks’

    The Sunday Read: ‘The Quest by Circadian Medicine to Make the Most of Our Body Clocks’

    The concept of having a “body clock” is a familiar one, but less widespread is the awareness that our body contains several biological clocks. Understanding their whims and functions may help us optimize our lives and lead to better overall health, according to scientists.

    Every physiological system is represented by a clock, from the liver to the lungs, and each one is synced “to the central clock in the brain like an orchestra section following its conductor,” writes Kim Tingley, a New York Times journalist who explored the effect this knowledge has on how conditions are treated, and spoke to scientists about how misalignment or deregulation of these clocks can have a profound effect on our health.

    Exploring the components that dictate our lives, and how they work together like the “gears in a mechanical watch,” Ms. Tingley builds a case for the importance of paying attention to all our circadian rhythms — and not just when it comes to monitoring our sleep.

    • 54 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
87.6K Ratings

87.6K Ratings

Christine Shepherd ,

Where’s the coverage on mahsa amini and iran 2022 protests

Usually love… but why hasn’t a podcast been made yet on the situation in iran. Be their voice.

Cy445 ,

So incredibly biased

I AM a liberal, and I cannot believe how biased this podcast is towards the left 😭😭😭 like you’re not even trying to hide it at this point??? Please attempt to show both sides a bit more or I will probably stop listening soon because it just feels like propaganda…

newsjunqui ,

Circadian medicine

This article has had a profound effect on me. I’ve given up midnite snacking & I have revamped my daily schedule to align more closely to circadian rhythm. Thank u for such a valuable & instructional podcast!

You Might Also Like

NPR
New York Times Opinion
This American Life
NPR
Vox
New York Times Opinion

More by The New York Times

The New York Times
New York Times Opinion
The New York Times
New York Times Opinion
The New York Times
Serial Productions & The New York Times