46 episodes

“The Run-Up” is your guide to understanding the 2024 election. Host Astead W. Herndon talks to the people whose decisions will make the difference.

Listen to this podcast in New York Times Audio, our new iOS app for news subscribers. Download now at nytimes.com/audioapp

The Run-Up The New York Times

    • News
    • 4.4 • 1.6K Ratings

“The Run-Up” is your guide to understanding the 2024 election. Host Astead W. Herndon talks to the people whose decisions will make the difference.

Listen to this podcast in New York Times Audio, our new iOS app for news subscribers. Download now at nytimes.com/audioapp

    ‘What If Someone Dies?’ And Other 2024 Questions, Answered

    ‘What If Someone Dies?’ And Other 2024 Questions, Answered

    For the past few months, we’ve been asking our listeners to write in with questions, and we’ve gotten some great ones. Things like: How does polling work? Does Joe Biden’s stance on Gaza present a campaign challenge? And who might Donald Trump select as his running mate?

    But as we were sorting through them, an underlying theme started to emerge: People can’t seem to fathom that we’re careening toward a Biden-Trump rematch — and they want to know if anything could alter this seemingly inevitable reality.

    So today, with some of our most trusted colleagues on the Times Politics team, we talk through all of the hypotheticals: What happens in the case of a health emergency? How about a criminal conviction? Could this be the year that a third-party candidate breaks through? Or is it too late?

    Do you have a question you want us to answer? Nothing is out of bounds. We’re game for everything from the existential (Will democracy survive?) to the more trivial (Do celebrity endorsements make a difference?). Email us a voice memo with your question at therunup@nytimes.com.

    • 51 min
    Do Not Invite Donald Trump or Joe Biden on This Date

    Do Not Invite Donald Trump or Joe Biden on This Date

    If you had just a few minutes to win someone’s affection, how political would you get? Would you dive right in, or avoid politics altogether? The Run-Up went speed dating in suburban Philadelphia to find out.

    Usually when we’re out in the field, we’re at rallies or campaign events – places where people are vocal about their political beliefs. But for many participants at the dating event, talking politics was a complete turn off.

    This got us thinking: How do political divisions — the things that seem so present on the campaign trail and in polling — actually play out in people’s personal lives? We turned to two of our colleagues -- Anna Martin, host of the Modern Love Podcast, and Jessica Grose, a writer for the Times Opinion section -- for perspective and additional reporting from the intersection of love and politics.

    • 44 min
    How Political Polls Really Work

    How Political Polls Really Work

    Our listeners have lots of questions about polling.

    Questions such as: Is it still relevant? How does it work? How do you get a reliable sample when people don’t answer the phone?

    At this point in a usual primary season, still weeks away from Super Tuesday, most of the attention of polling would be on who might capture the nomination.

    But this year, with the race all but set, we’re anticipating nine months of polling on two men we already know very well.

    Today, to prepare for that future and to answer the many questions on the subject, we go behind the scenes with the New York Times polling team. And Nate Cohn, our chief political analyst, introduces us to “double haters” and other swingy voters he thinks will decide 2024.

    Do you have a question you want us to answer? Email and tell us what you’re curious about, ideally in the form of a voice memo, at therunup@nytimes.com.

    • 44 min
    Why Donald Trump Won Nevada Before Any Votes Were Cast

    Why Donald Trump Won Nevada Before Any Votes Were Cast

    Nevada is doing things differently this year. Or at least, it tried to.

    The first presidential nominating contest in the west takes place on Tuesday — and on Thursday.

    But that’s not what state officials were hoping would happen when they decided to move from a caucus to a primary in 2021.

    Democrats got on board — and President Biden is expected to win that contest handily on Tuesday. On the Republican side, however, things did not go according to plan.

    A caucus was seen as being beneficial to former President Donald J. Trump, so state party officials — who were aggressively lobbied by the Trump campaign — decided to hold a caucus anyway. The caucus, not the primary, is what will determine which Republican candidate wins Nevada’s delegates.

    Nikki Haley, the last remaining significant challenger to Mr. Trump, opted to run in the primary, not the caucus.

    So Mr. Trump is effectively in a caucus without a real opponent. And his win is a foregone conclusion.

    Confused? You’re not alone.

    Today, with our colleague Jennifer Medina, we travel to East Las Vegas to talk to voters about what makes their state so critical — and so confounding — to Republicans and Democrats alike.

    • 23 min
    Will ‘Cease-Fire Now’ Drown Out ‘Biden 2024’?

    Will ‘Cease-Fire Now’ Drown Out ‘Biden 2024’?

    President Biden has started to switch gears into campaign mode.

    On the trail, he’s particularly focused on South Carolina, which holds the first official Democratic primary contest on Saturday. And one of his first campaign events of the year took him to Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, for a speech that addressed the dangers of white supremacy.

    But a few minutes into the speech, he was interrupted by protesters calling for a cease-fire in Gaza.

    Since that day in early January, it seems as if wherever Biden goes, protesters are ready to voice their dissatisfaction with the way the administration is handling the war between Israel and Hamas.

    Today: The activists drowning out the president at campaign events. And the Arab American swing state mayor, Abdullah Hammoud of Dearborn, Mich., on why he declined a recent invitation from Biden’s team.

    • 43 min
    The ‘People’s President’ vs. the Donor Class

    The ‘People’s President’ vs. the Donor Class

    Donald Trump’s victory over Nikki Haley in the New Hampshire primary made two things clear: The MAGA wing of the G.O.P. is ready for his coronation, while anti-Trump Republicans believe the race is far from over.

    From inside Trump’s victory party on Tuesday night, we hear from supporters of the former president and from the stars of his orbit, who see themselves as being on the verge of “obliterating the establishment.” And from Tim Draper, a billionaire venture capitalist who is backing Haley.

    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
1.6K Ratings

1.6K Ratings

Rallye425 ,

Love the additional coverage from a unique perspective.

I’ve really enjoyed the way this man has come to each topic by fairly talking to both sides and learning what’s at the heart of the left and right.
I just hope he chases down RFK JR. and gives his angle a chance. I’d like to hear who his fans and detractors are.

EricDLock ,

Great show, great host

Astead Herndon is a terrific interviewer. He’s very disarming and gets people to open up to him because, it seems to me, he’s honestly curious about their point of view. In this sense, I think his gift is that he’s just an old journalist. Refreshing!

BryanReviews ,

Interviewer issues

It’s a good podcast, but sometimes the interviewer speaks as if he’s rushed and interrupts a lot.

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