300 episodes

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • Daily News
    • 4.5 • 69.5K Ratings

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    A Pivotal Senate Race in North Carolina

    A Pivotal Senate Race in North Carolina

    In the struggle to control the U.S. Senate, one race in North Carolina — where the Republican incumbent, Thom Tillis, is trying to hold off his Democratic challenger, Cal Cunningham — could be crucial.

    North Carolina is a classic purple state with a split political mind: progressive in some quarters, while firmly steeped in Southern conservative tradition in others.

    Two bombshells have recently upended the race: Mr. Tillis fell ill with the coronavirus after attending an event for Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court nomination without a mask. And Mr. Cunningham’s image was sullied by the emergence of text messages showing that he had engaged in an extramarital affair.

    Jonathan Martin, a national political correspondent for The Times, talks us through the race and examines the factors that could determine who prevails.

    Guest: Jonathan Martin, a national political correspondent for The New York Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: North Carolina is a linchpin in the 2020 election — the presidency and the Senate could hinge on results in the state.Here’s how the critical senate race was engulfed in chaos in a single night.

    • 26 min
    The Field: A Divided Latino Vote in Arizona

    The Field: A Divided Latino Vote in Arizona

    This episode contains strong language. 

    In the last decade, elections have tightened in Arizona, a traditionally Republican stronghold, as Democrats gain ground.

    According to polls, Joe Biden is leading in the state — partly because of white suburban women moving away from President Trump, but also because of efforts to activate the Latino vote.

    Will that turn states like Arizona blue? And do enough Hispanic voters actually want Mr. Biden as president?

    To gauge the atmosphere, Jennifer Medina, a national politics reporter for The New York Times, spoke to Democratic activists and Trump supporters in Arizona.

    Guests: Jennifer Medina, a national politics reporter for The Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: Though a majority of Latino voters favors Democrats, Hispanic men are a small but enduring part of Trump’s base. Those supporters see him as forceful, unapologetic and a symbol of economic success.If Joe Biden wins Arizona, he would be only the second Democratic presidential candidate to have done so since 1952. But the state has been trending more friendly to the party for years.

    • 39 min
    The Sunday Read: 'Jim Dwyer, About New York'

    The Sunday Read: 'Jim Dwyer, About New York'

    Jim Dwyer, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist for The New York Times, died earlier this month. He was 63.

    Throughout his nearly 40-year career, Jim was drawn to stories about discrimination, wrongly convicted prisoners and society’s mistreated outcasts. From 2007, he wrote The Times’s “About New York” column — when asked whether he had the best job in journalism, he responded, “I believe I do.”

    Dan Barry, a reporter for The Times who also wrote for the column, has called Jim a “newsman of consequence” and “a determined voice for the vulnerable.” Today, he reads two stories written by Jim, his friend and colleague.

    These stories were written by Jim Dwyer and read by Dan Barry. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

    • 21 min
    The Candidates: Joe Biden’s Plans

    The Candidates: Joe Biden’s Plans

    In the second of a two-part examination of the presidential candidates’ policies, we turn to Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s agenda and how he plans to govern a nation wracked by a public health and economic crisis.

    The themes of Mr. Biden’s Democratic primary campaign were broad as he eschewed the policy-intensive approach of opponents like Senator Elizabeth Warren. But the onset of the pandemic helped shape and crystallize his policy plans.

    His approach stands in stark contrast to that of President Trump: Mr. Biden wants to actively mobilize federal resources in addressing the pandemic, an expansion to health care that he hopes will endure beyond the coronavirus.

    Today, we speak to Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent, about Mr. Biden’s plans for dealing with the current crisis and beyond.

    Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political reporter at The New York Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: We delve into the candidates’ backgrounds and present key questions about the campaigns of Donald Trump and Joe Biden.With 18 days to go, here’s a guide to the 2020 election with the latest updates, polling news and information on how to vote.

    • 29 min
    The Candidates: Donald Trump’s Promises

    The Candidates: Donald Trump’s Promises

    In a two-part examination of the policies of the president and of the man seeking to replace him, Joe Biden, we first take a look at what Donald Trump said he would do four years ago — and what he’s actually accomplished.

    On some of the big issues, Mr. Trump has been the president he told us he was going to be, keeping commitments on deregulation, taxes, military spending and the judiciary.

    But other potent promises — such as replacing Obamacare, draining “the swamp” in Washington and forcing Mexico to pay for a border wall — have withered.

    Today, we speak to Peter Baker, The Times’s chief White House correspondent, about Mr. Trump’s record. Tomorrow, we scrutinize Mr. Biden’s plans for the presidency.

    Guest: Peter Baker, chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: We delve into the background of the candidates and present key questions about the campaigns of Donald Trump and Joe Biden.With 19 days to go, here’s a guide to the 2020 election with the latest updates, polling news and information on how to vote.

    • 36 min
    The Confirmation Hearing of Amy Coney Barrett

    The Confirmation Hearing of Amy Coney Barrett

    It was a 12-hour session. Twenty-two senators took turns questioning Judge Amy Coney Barrett on her record and beliefs.

    Senator Dianne Feinstein, Democrat of California, evoked personal experience of life before Roe v. Wade and asked Judge Barrett whether she would vote to overturn abortion rights.

    On that question, Judge Barrett demurred — an approach she would take to other contentious issues, including whether she would recuse herself if a presidential election dispute came before the court.

    With Judge Barrett’s confirmation all but certain, Democratic senators pressed her more with the election in mind than out of any hope of derailing her rise.

    Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times, gives us a rundown of the second day of the hearings.

    Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The Times.




    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: In declining to detail her legal views, Judge Barrett said she would not be “a pawn” of President Trump.With the hearing taking place closer to an election than any other Supreme Court confirmation — and with the Senate Republican majority at real risk — the proceeding was riddled with electoral politics.Judge Barrett’s testimony was a deft mix of expertise and evasion. She demonstrated easy familiarity with Supreme Court precedents but said almost nothing about whether they should stand.

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
69.5K Ratings

69.5K Ratings

jjhunsecker ,

The best

My news source

rebrab43 ,

Used to be great

This used to be my #1 podcast. The topics were broad as well as fascinating & the reporting and host were fairly unbiased. All that seems to have slipped away over the last couple of years. Barbaro still does his job well but the political slant has me tuning out.

TexasBrees ,

THE BIAS IS IN THE TITLES

BIDEN HAS HAD “PLANS” (lol) FOR 47 YEARS!!!! YOU REALLY THINK HE IS GOING TO HELP ANYONE???

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