105 episodes

Scott Rada, Lee Enterprises social media manager, and Richard Kyte, director of the Ethics Institute at Viterbo University, talk about the intersection of ethics and modern life.

Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or on Spotify.

The Ethical Life Lee Enterprises Podcasts

    • Society & Culture
    • 3.6 • 19 Ratings

Scott Rada, Lee Enterprises social media manager, and Richard Kyte, director of the Ethics Institute at Viterbo University, talk about the intersection of ethics and modern life.

Follow the show on Apple Podcasts or on Spotify.

    Has influx of money made it tougher to be a sports fan?

    Has influx of money made it tougher to be a sports fan?

    Episode 143:  Americans’ love affair with sports is stronger than ever. According to a poll earlier this year by Pew Research, about half of Americans say they took part in organized, competitive sports in high school or college; most Americans who played sports in high school or college say their athletic experiences improved their physical health and confidence; and nearly 4-in-10 Americans follow professional or college sports at least somewhat closely.

    Hosts Richard Kyte and Scott Rada discuss whether legalized gambling, the reliance on TV revenue and costly taxpayer-funded stadiums make sports less appealing.

    Discussion topics:

    The dark side of the sports betting boom, by Nathaniel Meyersohn, CNN

    Cash-grabbing power players are sending college sports Into a soulless spiral, by Pat Forde, Sports Illustrated

    Stadium subsidies are getting even more ridiculous, by Dan Moore, The Atlantic

    About the hosts

    Scott Rada is a digital strategist with Lee Enterprises, and Richard Kyte is the director of the D.B. Reinhart Institute for Ethics in Leadership at Viterbo University in La Crosse, Wisconsin. His forthcoming book, "Finding Your Third Place," will be published by Fulcrum Books.

    • 50 min
    What can be done to make housing more affordable?

    What can be done to make housing more affordable?

    Episode 142: Most economists say that the U.S. economy is in a relatively strong position. Although inflation is still a concern, overall GDP numbers are strong, the unemployment rate is low, and wages are rising. Yet in a poll from earlier this year, just 28 percent of Americans rated national economic conditions as excellent or good.

    There are many reasons for this disconnect, but one is certainly the high price of housing and the stubborn problem of homelessness in many of our cities.

    Hosts Richard Kyte and Scott Rada talk about how the tight housing supply and zoning restrictions are especially harmful for those with the lowest incomes. 

    Links to stories mentioned in the podcast: 

    We can solve housing one communithy at a time, by Richard Kyte

    Share of gross rent in household income in the United States in 2022, by Statista

    Why is housing inventory so low? Understanding the the U.S. housing shortage, by Jess Ullrich, Bankrate

    Where are all the apartments for families? by Rachel Cohen, Vox

    Homeless or overhoused: Boomers are stuck at both ends of the housing spectrum, The Wall Street Journal

    Biden administration to boost affordable housing programs, supply of manufactured homes, by Alex Gangitano, The Hill

    Looking for a new car under $20,000? Good luck. Your choice has dwindled to one vehicle, by Tom Krisher, The Associated Press

    About the hosts: Scott Rada is a digital strategist with Lee Enterprises, and Richard Kyte is the director of the D.B. Reinhart Institute for Ethics in Leadership at Viterbo University in La Crosse, Wisconsin. His forthcoming book, "Finding Your Third Place," will be published by Fulcrum Books.

    • 50 min
    Can too many choices in life keep us from making decisions?

    Can too many choices in life keep us from making decisions?

    Episode 141: Our lives are dependent on the choices we make, and in most cases, we have more choices than ever.

    A study by Harvard University shows that having fewer choices can promote happiness because the more options you have, the more opportunities you have to regret the choice you've made. There is also a term called the “parallelizing paradox,” which is when people who are faced with more options than they can effectively consider feel unsure what to do.

    Hosts Richard Kyte and Scott Rada discuss how people can navigate the seemingly unlimited number of options they face in everyday life.

    • 54 min
    When is a protest ethically justified?

    When is a protest ethically justified?

    Episode 140: Nearly seven months after the Israel-Hamas war began, many campuses across the country are dealing with pro-Palestinian demonstrations and encampments.

    Some college presidents have chosen to involve the police, which has led to hundreds of students being arrested. In addition, these protests have again stirred up a debate about the limits of free speech, as some think the messaging has become antisemitic.

    Hosts Richard Kyte and Scott Rada discuss the four tenets of ethical protests and why such principles are important.

    Links to stories mentioned in the podcast:

    Are student protests against Israel missing the mark?, by Richard Kyte

    What students read before they protest, by Ross Douthat, The New York Times

    Columbia University responds after Robert Kraft says he's pulling support over anti-semitic violence,  by Greg Norman, Fox Business

    College students should study more, by Matthew Yglesias, Slow Boring

    About the hosts: Scott Rada is a digital strategist with Lee Enterprises, and Richard Kyte is the director of the D.B. Reinhart Institute for Ethics in Leadership at Viterbo University in La Crosse, Wis. His forthcoming book, "Finding Your Third Place," will be published by Fulcrum Books.

    • 49 min
    Are these five things the secret to happiness?

    Are these five things the secret to happiness?

    Episode 139: If you were making a list of superstar psychologists, Carl Jung would be toward the top. According to a recent story by Arthur C. Brooks in The Atlantic, the one-time associate of Sigmund Freud coined the terms extravert and introvert, along with many of the other words we use to describe mental health today.

    One topic he thought a lot about was happiness, and how difficult it was to obtain. In 1960, as he neared the end of his long life, Jung shared five pillars that he said could help us make progress toward being happy. Hosts Richard Kyte and Scott Rada discuss these five pillars and why they each play an important role:


    Good physical and mental health.
    Good personal and intimate relations, such as those of marriage, family and friendships
    Seeing beauty in art and in nature.
    A reasonable standard of living and satisfactory work.
    A philosophical or religious outlook that fosters resilience.

    About the hosts: Scott Rada is social media manager with Lee Enterprises, and Richard Kyte is the director of the D.B. Reinhart Institute for Ethics in Leadership at Viterbo University in La Crosse, Wis. His forthcoming book, "Finding Your Third Place," will be published by Fulcrum Books.

    • 50 min
    Should AI be used to help us stay in touch with the dead?

    Should AI be used to help us stay in touch with the dead?

    Episode 138: There are 137 episodes of The Ethical Life podcast, and that means there are more than 6,000 minutes of hosts Richard Kyte and Scott Rada talking about various ethical issues. This also means that AI can stitch together all this information and create replicas that would sound — and possibly even think — like them.

    Some people already are using such technologies to attempt to keep alive relationships for people who have died. The hosts discuss whether such technologies would help with the healing process or instead make it tougher to move on.

    Links to stories discussed during the podcast:

    Using AI to talk to the dead, by Rebecca Carballo, The New York Times

    Artificial intelligence advances fuel industry trying to preserve loved ones after death, Max Zahn, ABC News

    AI versions of deceased loved ones could be a serious threat to mental health, by Nigel Mulligan, The Conversation

    About the hosts: Scott Rada is social media manager with Lee Enterprises, and Richard Kyte is the director of the D.B. Reinhart Institute for Ethics in Leadership at Viterbo University in La Crosse, Wis. His forthcoming book, "Finding Your Third Place," will be published by Fulcrum Books.

    • 42 min

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5
19 Ratings

19 Ratings

bw7373 ,

Very left leaning

The podcast has turned into a situation where Scott Rada brings the left leaning news room story of the day to the podcast, never a real ethical situation/delema. Scott’s attempt to smear Clarence Thomas in this last episode was an embarrassment. When Richard Kyte started to question looking into other justices, I verbally thanked him out loud. We all know that if Sonya Sotomayor was accused of this, it would never have been brought up as a topic. Love the concept of the show, but really getting tired of left leaning topics…

GraceOM ,

Light on ethics - immigrants.

It’s shallow on the politics. Nothing more than headlines.
What is lacking is the ethical dimension.

These questions are not addressed:

what is the moral argument for treating immigrants - the Other?
Then what is international law regarding refugees, immigrants, asylum seekers?
What are the arguments from our founding documents about immigrants?
What do the major religions say about what obligations we have to the Other?

This was a shallow back and forth on superficial politics. This is not a discussion of ethics. Nothing of any depth.
Real disappointment. Delete

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