67 episodes

The Glossy Beauty Podcast is the newest podcast from Glossy.
Each 30-minute episode features candid conversations about how today’s trends, such as CBD and self-care, are shaping the future of the beauty and wellness industries. With a unique assortment of guests, The Glossy Beauty Podcast provides its listeners with a variety of insights and approaches to these categories, which are experiencing explosive growth. From new retail strategies on beauty floors, to the importance of filtering skincare products through crystals, this show sets out to help listeners understand everything that is going on today, and prepare for what will show up in their feeds tomorrow.

The Glossy Beauty Podcast Glossy

    • Fashion & Beauty

The Glossy Beauty Podcast is the newest podcast from Glossy.
Each 30-minute episode features candid conversations about how today’s trends, such as CBD and self-care, are shaping the future of the beauty and wellness industries. With a unique assortment of guests, The Glossy Beauty Podcast provides its listeners with a variety of insights and approaches to these categories, which are experiencing explosive growth. From new retail strategies on beauty floors, to the importance of filtering skincare products through crystals, this show sets out to help listeners understand everything that is going on today, and prepare for what will show up in their feeds tomorrow.

    Kopari Beauty co-founder Gigi Goldman on how coconut oil is the new Windex

    Kopari Beauty co-founder Gigi Goldman on how coconut oil is the new Windex

    Before co-founding Kopari Beauty with Kiana Cabell, James Brennan and her husband Bryce, Gigi Goldman was already using its star ingredient with abandon. "I don’t know if you’ve seen ‘My Big Fat Greek Wedding’ where they use Windex to solve all their problems -- well, I was that way with coconut oil," Goldman said on the Glossy Beauty Podcast.
    At the time she was a stay-at-home mom concerned about the best natural products to use while raising three children. After starting the company in 2015, the brand is one of the leaders in the body care category; Kopari products include deodorants, scrubs, toothpaste, masks and sexual wellness products.
    These items are found at a number of retailers including Ulta, Sephora, Nordstrom and Urban Outfitters, but you won't find every Kopari Beauty product at each of these stores. "We tailor our assortment to each retailer, and we collaborate with them to see what's really going to be mutually beneficial for each," Goldman said. "You have to consider price point, you have to consider assortment, you have to consider if it's a lifestyle store."
    Goldman talked about acquisition rumors, the company's recent foray into CBD, what makes coconut oil a hero ingredient and the company's efforts to build homes in the Philippines, where their coconuts are sourced.

    • 29 min
    'Talking to those two extremes is where we come alive:' The Inkey List co-founders Colette Laxton and Mark Curry on their skin care brand

    'Talking to those two extremes is where we come alive:' The Inkey List co-founders Colette Laxton and Mark Curry on their skin care brand

    "We've been in failed startups, we've been in tough times in early days," said The Inkey List co-founder Mark Curry. But Curry credited early business non-starts for the cautious and measured way he and co-founder Colette Laxton are stewarding their latest company, The Inkey List, a skin care line with products under $15.
    "With The Inkey List, it was all of our learnings that we took of what worked [and] what didn't work," Laxton said. Curry, for his part, had a prior life starting a female feminine care line way before sexual wellness products were making a splash in beauty retailers.
    Further trial-and-error was methodic. Laxton and Curry incubated several beauty lines via its umbrella company, Be for Beauty, before landing on its hitmaker.
    Since debuting in the U.K. in late 2018, The Inkey List is available exclusively in Sephora in the U.S., as well as in select channels in Southeast Asia. As the brand has grown over the last two years, education is a big part of The Inkey List's awareness plans, even if consumers use said information to then buy the brand's products elsewhere or buy from other companies entirely.
    "We want to be the brand that gives the consumer the right information to help them," Laxton said. The company plans on launching "Ask Inkey," a 24/7 chat service for anyone with a question or concern about skin care or ingredients. The brand is also in the midst of retooling its website.
    Despite their insistence on careful growth, Curry said he hopes The Inkey List will "be a $100 million brand."
    The founders joined the Glossy Beauty Podcast to talk about properly educating consumers, biding their time and how past failures helped them finally succeed.

    • 38 min
    E.l.f. Cosmetics CEO Tarang Amin on the strategies that turned the beauty company around

    E.l.f. Cosmetics CEO Tarang Amin on the strategies that turned the beauty company around

    When E.l.f. Cosmetics went public in 2016 after a majority investment from TPG just two years earlier, it seemed like the sky was the limit for the millennial-minded beauty brand.
    "E.l.f. has always been this brand that had the best of beauty, but made it accessible at these incredible price points," E.l.f. Chairman and CEO Tarang Amin said on the Glossy Beauty Podcast.
    The company had just reached about $100 million in yearly sales when TPG invested -- in part by cracking how to sell $1 priced makeup online -- and was growing 20% annually, according to Amin. But 2018 saw a slump in both the company's sales and relevance online.
    "For us it seemed like death," Amin said.
    The year-long slowing of color cosmetic sales overall didn't help his outlook. E.l.f. closed its 22 standalone stores in February 2019. But freeing up $13.7 million in capital helped the company focus on e-commerce and wholesale via its "Project Unicorn" plan to turn the business around.
    Thanks to a repackaging campaign (favoring colors, not just black); a renewed focus on fewer, but better prestige-level products; and a TikTok brand challenge, E.l.f. has seen four quarters of growth. And in many cases, the company has bested its competitors in the makeup segment.
    Amin talked about the ongoing headwinds in the color cosmetics category, the white space opening up in India, the company's plan for incubation and M&A and his indifference, at first, to the rise of influencer-driven brands.

    • 28 min
    Francesco Clark on founding, selling and buying back his skin care company

    Francesco Clark on founding, selling and buying back his skin care company

    When Francesco Clark started experimenting with skin care formulas, it was to help himself. At 24, a diving accident left him paralyzed from the neck down.
    That might sound like the beginning of Clark's Botanicals, the skin care company he founded, but it took a nudge from his former boss, Harper's Bazaar editor-in-chief Glenda Bailey. She applied the contents of a glass vial that Clark's sister, Charlotte, had spirited away from the founder's home laboratory at a visit a decade ago.
    "I got home and I was incredibly embarrassed because I was kind of like, 'Charlotte, this is not a brand.'"
    Bailey called a few weeks later to insist that she feature the product in Harper's Bazaar's September issue. The ball was in Clark's court to package his homemade product ("'make it look chic,'") into something marketable. Clark's Botanicals launched in stores that same year.
    Though the brand has been on roller-coaster ride the last four years -- Clark bought back his company last year after relying on private equity funding in 2016 -- he is feeling bullish about the future.
    "You have to remove yourself from it, you have to look at the business holistically and how committed your customers will be to the brand after it is acquired," Clark said. "If the investment means the brand is growing in the right ways, then you should do it."

    • 36 min
    Beautyblender founder and CEO Rea Ann Silva on elevating "a throwaway product"

    Beautyblender founder and CEO Rea Ann Silva on elevating "a throwaway product"

    As a makeup artist for 25 years, Rea Ann Silva was intimately familiar with the pain points for those in her line of work. She tried to avoid bringing unwieldy airbrush kits on set when she could, and worked hard to create natural-looking makeup looks for high-definition video without much product.
    "My main and number one concern was creating and making a product that was effective," Silva said on the Glossy Beauty Podcast of her hero makeup sponge, the Beautyblender. "I figured that my audience would be other makeup artists like myself."
    Millions of product sales later -- and a reported $175 million in sales for 2019 -- Silva have proven her Beautyblender is anything but a niche product.
    On this week's episode, Silva talked about how "retailers didn't really get" Beautyblender at first, learning from influencers and the critical opinions of her foundation launch.

    • 34 min
    Annie Lawless on making lipstick that's safe enough to eat

    Annie Lawless on making lipstick that's safe enough to eat

    Annie Lawless is on a mission to make clean makeup as luxurious as its classic counterparts.
    "As a makeup girl who loves full coverage and wears a full face of makeup every day, I just couldn't find clean products on the market that performed the way a lot of the conventional makeup I was used to using did," Lawless said on this week's episode of the Glossy Beauty Podcast.
    Though clean skin care had trickled down to consumers, thanks to brands like Drunk Elephant, clean makeup was largely still unchartered territory.
    "It seemed so crazy to me that I was spending more on clean skin care and then putting those ingredients right back on my face five minutes later with my makeup," she said. "We've all put on lipstick, and an hour later, it's off. Where did it go? I mean, we ate it, essentially," Lawless said.
    In the latest Glossy Beauty podcast, Lawless talked about her brand founder story, what she thinks of acquisition and how why she's eager to get back to basics.

    • 36 min

Customer Reviews

libbyaudrey ,

One of My Favorite Beauty Podcasts!

I listen to quite a few podcasts that talk about leaders in the beauty industry. What I love most about Glossy Beauty’s podcast is the length of each episode and the guests they interview. I was introduced to this podcast by the first episode featuring Miranda Kerr, who I have admired for years. There are so many podcasts talking about beauty these days, but the leaders they bring on Glossy Beauty are relevant and have such interesting stories of how they started their businesses.

beautyjunkie0711 ,

Overall Great But Inconsistent Based On Guest

Hands down the Tatcha and Wander Beauty episodes are THE BEST. The founders share a passion for their companies and customers and it’s obvious. Lots of good info in those episodes and I learned a lot. The RMS episode is simply awful: the founder is condescending and thinks she’s funny. Skip the LOLA episode as she sounds like a marketing robot. All marketing language and no soul.

meghanlee4 ,

HONESTLY THANK YOU

The best. The effing best. I struggle finding podcasts that talk about the beauty industry that keep my attention episode after episode. I haven’t listened to the original glossy podcast yet but I will start it now. I listened to every single episode in one day.

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