172 episodes

The Glossy Podcast is a weekly show discussing the impact of technology on the fashion and luxury industries with the people making change happen.

The Glossy Podcast Glossy

    • Business
    • 4.1, 148 Ratings

The Glossy Podcast is a weekly show discussing the impact of technology on the fashion and luxury industries with the people making change happen.

    'A return to simplicity': Soludos founder Nick Brown on the trends brought about by the pandemic

    'A return to simplicity': Soludos founder Nick Brown on the trends brought about by the pandemic

    To forecast the next fashion trends, Soludos founder Nick Brown looked to past crises.
    Before the 2008 crisis, "it was all about ornaments and stuff being very sexy and over-the-top," Brown said on the Glossy Podcast. "Then in 2010, it shifted toward minimalism and modernism."
    Brown wagered that fashion will stay on the minimalist side. But either way, shoes are a tough category. "In some of these customer surveys, and certainly in my own life, I'm only buying what I need to, and I'm not going out that much," Brown said.
    As a result, Soludos is focusing on fewer products and sustainable production.
    Product delivery has also evolved. Soludos' sales have moved online; 70% of its sales now come through its own website, Brown said. "We've all seen the numbers that, in two months, there's been 10 years' worth of e-commerce penetration," he said.

    • 35 min
    Commando founder Kerry O'Brien: Boutiques are set to see a resurgence

    Commando founder Kerry O'Brien: Boutiques are set to see a resurgence

    In fashion, the small businesses have suffered more than the big ones since March.
    But Commando founder Kerry O'Brien thinks that, for those boutiques that can survive a tortuous shutdown, the other side will be a lot brighter. "I think they're going to have a resurgence if they can make it through these times," she said. "Women are going to want to go to their local shop, and they're going to want to have a conversation with someone they know in a small setting."
    Boutiques were where Commando, which started off in the underwear category, got its start. It's still carried in more than 1,000 boutiques, as well as at major department stores.
    O'Brien launched the company in 2003, a few years after having quit her job at public relations giant Edelman the day after 9/11.
    The company has since grown, playing a role in the surge in popularity of bike shorts, according to O'Brien. Bella Hadid wore a pair by Commando at Paris Fashion Week in 2017.
    O'Brien thinks women shopping for clothes are now looking for two things: comfort and transparency about where the clothes came from. Commando manufactures its products in the United States and imports most fabrics from Europe.
    With the pandemic keeping retail foot traffic down, she's been spending most of her time at the company's home base in Burlington, Vermont. For a recent photo shoot, O'Brien said, "We used a local model. We can't bring in a New York City model, because they would have to quarantine."

    • 37 min
    Designer LaQuan Smith on overcoming lockdown challenges and industry tokenism

    Designer LaQuan Smith on overcoming lockdown challenges and industry tokenism

    The ongoing demand for LaQuan Smith's signature sexy designs is both a blessing and a curse, as he put it on the Glossy Podcast.

    "It was a very humbling experience, because I had to find alternative ways to still be able to produce these orders," Smith said. "Thankful they didn't get dropped, but also, damn, because I'm now in a compromised position: How do I get these done, how do I fulfill all these orders on time?"
    Smith pulled it off by having his cutters work from home while "packing and shipping from my living room," he said. To him, the fact that his designs are in demand despite a pandemic gives him further confidence in his self-named brand, which he said faced significant doubts when it debuted in 2013.
    But he said he's recently faced tokenism, whereby his achievements as a designer have been flattened by his grouping with other Black designers.
    "You can't group me with [someone] who just started designing three months ago on Instagram. That's not fair," Smith said, referring to the lists of Black designers to support, that have recently surfaced across media channels. "They're putting all these Black designers in one box. To me, this is not the way you do that. If you want to really celebrate designers of color, you do it the right way."

    • 45 min
    Something Navy's Arielle Charnas and Matt Scanlan on the brand's delayed (and massive) launch

    Something Navy's Arielle Charnas and Matt Scanlan on the brand's delayed (and massive) launch

    After a pandemic-caused delay, influencer Arielle Charnas' clothing company Something Navy finally relaunched last week as a direct-to-consumer brand, after selling exclusively as a Nordstrom collaboration.
    For her and interim CEO Matt Scanlan, it was worth the wait: Online, Something Navy grossed $1 million in just 30 minutes, according to Charnas and Scanlan.
    "The velocity and speed of sales totally broke our back end," Scanlan said on the Glossy Podcast.
    Charnas has a considerable Instagram following of 1.3 million to thank for the marketing push. In fact, Something Navy didn't spend a dollar on traditional marketing, Scanlan said.
    But a massive following can also come with scrutiny. Back in March, Charnas drew criticism for the way she handled a Covid-19 diagnosis -- withdrawing to a house outside of NYC, rather than staying home.
    "People wanted me to be more sensitive about what was going on in the world, and I should have been," Charnas said.
    Scanlan and Charnas talked about the lessons learned, the future of influencer culture and the new KPIs for a clothing company.

    • 50 min
    'A great way to get everyone's attention': Anifa Mvuemba on the Instagram Live show that turned heads

    'A great way to get everyone's attention': Anifa Mvuemba on the Instagram Live show that turned heads

    Putting on a digital fashion show isn't especially revolutionary.
    But Anifa Mvuemba, the founder of Hanifa, gave her Instagram Live show a novel twist: there weren't any models, whether digital or real.
    "This will be a great way to get everyone's attention," Mvuemba recalled thinking, on the Glossy Podcast.
    Her virtual runway was stalked by Hanifa dresses, moving of their own accord as if draped over moving ghosts. It was a painstaking endeavor of animation and design, but it paid off.
    Tens of thousands tuned in, according to Fast Company. "The sales, it was immediate -- probably the best month we've had since I started my company," Mvuemba said.
    The attention was big enough to push Mvuemba into a more significant public relations hire in the Hinton Group. Next, Mvuemba plans on turning heads again with technical feats (even though "we're still coming down from the high from the first one") and launching shapewear for women of color in the coming months.

    • 34 min
    Sarah Ahmed on making Warp+Weft's future 'pandemic-proof'

    Sarah Ahmed on making Warp+Weft's future 'pandemic-proof'

    Speaking for her corner of the fashion industry -- luxury denim -- Warp+Weft founder Sarah Ahmed said that discussions around racial issues should only be beginning. "If everyone was always receptive to this -- to racial equality -- we wouldn't be having these problems," Ahmed said on the Glossy Podcast.
    "We all need to take a look: maybe the joke that we make, the model choice that we made -- why did we make that?" she said.
    Warp+Weft is progressive on other fronts. Its manufacturing process consumes a fraction of the water that jeans -- a notoriously resource-intense garment -- typically do, according to Ahmed.
    And because of the impact of the pandemic, Ahmed hopes to make the family-owned businesses she's a part of (Warp+Weft is one, DL1961 is the other) smarter about human resources.
    Ahmed said the company saw a spike in e-commerce sales -- yes, even though they're jeans, not sweatpants. But it still had to make layoffs. For the future, Ahmed said, "I talk to people on the team and tell them 'Listen, let's make you and this role irreplaceable -- and so key to the company that you feel needed, and we need you, and you're pandemic-proof.' I think that's how employers need to be looking at their roles."

    • 57 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
148 Ratings

148 Ratings

Casaaaaaabdra ,

Nice.

Keep it up!
- Cassandra McClure
Clean Beauty Podcast

Buzzbuzzbuzz22 ,

Why give a platform to terrible people?

AC has proven to be a terrible business person and a morally bankrupt human. Also her line is unoriginal and failed at Nordstrom’s. Unclear what the story is here?

DexterEV17 ,

Has Potential

I do enjoy this podcast, but as many others have said- the host needs to work on her interviewing skills. Too cheery when the situation does not always call for that response, asks questions in a confusing way, and doesn’t always steer the conversation to where it should be. At times, the designers can be very tone deaf (many mention escaping the city during Covid, etc) and that can be a turn off.

Top Podcasts In Business

Listeners Also Subscribed To