318 episodes

Literature enthusiast Jacke Wilson journeys through the history of literature, from ancient epics to contemporary classics. Find out more at historyofliterature.com and facebook.com/historyofliterature. Support the show by visiting patreon.com/literature or paypal.me/jackewilson.

The History of Literature The Podglomerate

    • Arts
    • 4.6 • 713 Ratings

Literature enthusiast Jacke Wilson journeys through the history of literature, from ancient epics to contemporary classics. Find out more at historyofliterature.com and facebook.com/historyofliterature. Support the show by visiting patreon.com/literature or paypal.me/jackewilson.

    333 Tristram Shandy

    333 Tristram Shandy

    It's the OG of experimental literature! (In English, anyway...) In this episode, Jacke takes a look at the wild and woolly Tristram Shandy by Laurence Sterne. And in spite of Dr. Johnson's famous claim that "nothing odd will do long - Tristram Shandy did not last!" we're still talking about this classic eighteenth-century novel. Who was Sterne? What rules did he break? And what power does it have for a reader today?
    Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. (We appreciate it!) Find out more at historyofliterature.com, jackewilson.com, or by following Jacke and Mike on Twitter at @thejackewilson and @literatureSC. Or send an email to jackewilsonauthor@gmail.com.
    New!!! Looking for an easy to way to buy Jacke a coffee? Now you can at paypal.me/jackewilson. Your generosity is much appreciated!
    The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 14 min
    332 Hamlet (with Laurie Frankel)

    332 Hamlet (with Laurie Frankel)

    Novelist Laurie Frankel joins Jacke to talk about her writing, her theater background, and her new novel One Two Three. Then Jacke and Laurie geek out on Shakespeare and choose the Top 10 Things To Love About Hamlet.
    Laurie Frankel is the New York Times bestselling, award-winning author of novels such as The Atlas of Love, Goodbye for Now, and the Reese’s Book Club x Hello Sunshine Book Pick This Is How It Always Is. Frankel lives in Seattle with her husband, daughter, and border collie. She makes good soup.
    Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. (We appreciate it!) Find out more at historyofliterature.com, jackewilson.com, or by following Jacke and Mike on Twitter at @thejackewilson and @literatureSC. Or send an email to jackewilsonauthor@gmail.com.
    New!!! Looking for an easy to way to buy Jacke a coffee? Now you can at paypal.me/jackewilson. Your generosity is much appreciated!
    The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 16 min
    331 "The World Is Too Much With Us" by William Wordsworth

    331 "The World Is Too Much With Us" by William Wordsworth

    As the world struggles to emerge from a global pandemic, Jacke takes a look at our relationship with nature, turning to William Wordsworth's classic sonnet "The World Is Too Much With Us" to see if its concerns are applicable today.
    Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. (We appreciate it!) Find out more at historyofliterature.com, jackewilson.com, or by following Jacke and Mike on Twitter at @thejackewilson and @literatureSC. Or send an email to jackewilsonauthor@gmail.com.
    New!!! Looking for an easy to way to buy Jacke a coffee? Now you can at paypal.me/jackewilson. Your generosity is much appreciated!
    The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 13 min
    330 Middlemarch (with Yang Huang)

    330 Middlemarch (with Yang Huang)

    Yang Huang, author of the new novel My Good Son, joins Jacke for a discussion of her childhood in China, how censorship restricted her ability to imagine stories, and how George Eliot's Middlemarch helped her break free from these limitations. We also discuss her work as a novelist and what it's like to be an Asian American during a period of highly visible anti-Asian sentiment.
    YANG HUANG grew up in China and has lived in the United States since 1990. Her novel MY GOOD SON won the University of New Orleans Publishing Lab Prize. Her linked story collection, MY OLD FAITHFUL, won the Juniper Prize, and her debut novel, LIVING TREASURES, won the Nautilus Book Award silver medal. She works for the University of California, Berkeley and lives in the Bay Area with her family. To learn more about Yang and her writing, visit www.yanghuang.com or follow her on Twitter: @yangwrites.
    Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. (We appreciate it!) Find out more at historyofliterature.com, jackewilson.com, or by following Jacke and Mike on Twitter at @thejackewilson and @literatureSC. Or send an email to jackewilsonauthor@gmail.com.
    New!!! Looking for an easy to way to buy Jacke a coffee? Now you can at paypal.me/jackewilson. Your generosity is much appreciated!
    The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 21 min
    329 Miguel de Cervantes

    329 Miguel de Cervantes

    Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) was a soldier, a civil servant, a playwright, and a poet. He was kidnapped by pirates and held prisoner for almost five years. Later in life, he turned to writing novels, and through his masterpiece Don Quixote, he became the most celebrated and important figure in Spanish literature. In this episode, Jacke takes a look at Cervantes' incredible life and his most indelible creations, including the ingenious (and deluded) knight, his trusty squire, and the blurry landscape where windmills are giants and life is a romantic adventure..
    Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. (We appreciate it!) Find out more at historyofliterature.com, jackewilson.com, or by following Jacke and Mike on Twitter at @thejackewilson and @literatureSC. Or send an email to jackewilsonauthor@gmail.com.
    New!!! Looking for an easy to way to buy Jacke a coffee? Now you can at paypal.me/jackewilson. Your generosity is much appreciated!
    The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 10 min
    328 Aristophanes (with Aaron Poochigian)

    328 Aristophanes (with Aaron Poochigian)

    Often called the Father of Comedy, the satirical playwright Aristophanes (c. 450 BCE - 388 BCE) used his critical eye and sharp tongue to skewer politicians and philosophers alike. In this episode, poet and classicist Aaron Poochigian joins Jacke to discuss his new translation of four plays by Aristophanes - and explains why these ancient Athenian comedies (Clouds, Birds, Lysistrata, and Women of the Assembly) are especially relevant today.
    Works Discussed


    Four Plays by Aristophanes (translated by Aaron Poochigian)


    The Cutaway by Christina Kovac


    A Front Page Affair and Murder Between the Lines by Radha Vatsal


    Outlawed by Anna North


    Help support the show at patreon.com/literature or historyofliterature.com/shop. (We appreciate it!) Find out more at historyofliterature.com, jackewilson.com, or by following Jacke and Mike on Twitter at @thejackewilson and @literatureSC. Or send an email to jackewilsonauthor@gmail.com.
    New!!! Looking for an easy to way to buy Jacke a coffee? Now you can at paypal.me/jackewilson. Your generosity is much appreciated!
    The History of Literature Podcast is a member of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate Network. Learn more at www.thepodglomerate.com/historyofliterature.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 5 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
713 Ratings

713 Ratings

nickanderhoey ,

I read Flaubert

I was inspired by your Madame Bovary-melt the stars- episode!
Thank you. What should I read next?
CP

Gamage1991 ,

Grows of you

Of course, it took me a while to appreciate the unique nature of this podcast series. But for some reason I did keep coming back. The podcasts does not follow the usual linear progression of logical thought or buildup of material that I’m mostly familiar with. I wonder if I could call the podcaster’s style as “stream of consciousness with some structure”. Doesn’t matter what I call it, I do always end up with so many ideas, thoughts and things to write about halfway through an episode. I can’t imagine biking without this anymore! Good luck

Dougorsino ,

Caviar to the general

Admitting that this podcast will not be for everyone, I’m obsessed with Jacke’s extraordinary skill as a speaker, his knowledge and his background. This is for people who love to read. It is not stuffy or overly intellectual or condescending or negative in any way. His guests are diverse (as is the writing he looks at) and the format is fresh and always changing with the times. (I’m 100 or so episodes in - out of 300 and something - and I’ve listened to episodes both from the beginning and recent ones.) Jacke has a quirky sense of humor and he shares his personal connections to the books discussed. I have been moved and laughed out loud. Yes, there’s history and analysis and one can learn from this, but mostly it’s a celebration. He and his guests read from time to time and there are recordings of author’s reading their own works. I’ve enjoyed episodes about books and writers I’m unfamiliar with. One could pick and choose what to listen to without losing a thread. (I’ve listened to the first 60 episodes.) Lastly, the man lived in Asia and can speak with authority about books and poetry from cultures often overlooked in the west. Check it out.

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