100 episodes

A weekly take on business news in central Indiana. The IBJ Podcast is brought to you by Taft.

The IBJ Podcast Indianapolis Business Journal

    • News
    • 4.7 • 36 Ratings

A weekly take on business news in central Indiana. The IBJ Podcast is brought to you by Taft.

    Former budget hawk flips role, makes case for big increase in state health spending

    Former budget hawk flips role, makes case for big increase in state health spending

    No one disputes that Indiana residents rank very low among all Americans in terms of their health. The operative question, which will be posed to Indiana legislators in their budget-writing session beginning next month, is to what extent the state should try to intervene and do something about it.
    Last year, Gov. Eric Holcomb convened a special commission to conduct the first comprehensive assessment of Indiana’s public health system in more than three decades. It was co-chaired by former state senator Luke Kenley, the chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee from 2009 to 2017 and one of the most powerful holders of state purse strings for many years.
    This summer, the commission released its findings and recommendations. Its overarching proposal is that the state increase annual public health funding from about $55 per person—which ranks 48th in terms of state funding per capita in the nation—to $91 per person. That would cost another $242.6 million a year.
    Kenley’s job now is to convince skeptical state legislators that this added expenditure is worth it. In this week’s edition of the IBJ Podcast, Kenley discusses his strategy, as well as why the state’s public health spending has been so relatively meager up to this point. And he’s joined by Dr. Kristina Box, Indiana state health commissioner, to discuss the need to improve the health of Hoosiers and how best to deploy the proposed annual injection of $242.6 million.
    The IBJ Podcast is brought to you by Taft.

    • 46 min
    Indy-based airline charting path to more diverse workforce

    Indy-based airline charting path to more diverse workforce

    The U.S. airline industry isn’t just short of the pilots needed to meet travel demand. The demographic makeup of the industry’s pilot workforce remains overwhelmingly male and white.
    Indianapolis-based Republic Airways, one of the largest regional airlines in America, has a vested interest in trying to stock its talent pipeline—not just with pilots but for other aviation careers as well, including maintenance. And Republic has made a concerted effort in recent years to recruit more women and people of color and to eliminate barriers that might stand in the way of successful careers at the company.
    The airline’s initiatives include a three-day aviation career summit that in October attracted 1,100 attendees—including 750 students of color—from across the state. Republic is also in in the process of launching a campaign to raise $24 million to help 300 central Indiana students of color start careers in aviation.
    For this week’s edition of the IBJ Podcast, host Mason King is joined by Rob Lowe, Republic’s vice president of people and culture, and Alisha Spires, senior manager of talent acquisition for pilot recruiting, to discuss the barriers that women and people of color face when they consider aviation careers, and what Republic is doing to widen those horizons.
     
    The IBJ Podcast is brought to you by Taft.

    • 30 min
    Could Nashville steal Indy’s conventions-and-events thunder with new stadium?

    Could Nashville steal Indy’s conventions-and-events thunder with new stadium?

    The convention and events business that downtown Indianapolis has worked so hard to develop over recent decades has recovered fairly well from the worst days of the pandemic. But there’s a new competitor on the horizon.
    Nashville, Tennessee—a fellow NFL city that also has positioned its downtown for tourism—is on the brink of building a new football stadium downtown with a covered roof. As we know in Indianapolis, a stadium with a roof gives your city a lot more flexibility in attracting and staging major events—for sports, concerts and conventions. And Nashville officials have been clear that they’ll be going after events that Indianapolis currently hosts or traditionally is in the hunt to host.
    In this week’s edition of the IBJ Podcast, reporter IBJ’s Mickey Shuey tries to gauge the potential impact on Indianapolis of having a tougher competitor for some of the city’s bread-and-butter business.
    The IBJ Podcast is brought to you by Taft.

    • 32 min
    Four races to watch on on Election Day

    Four races to watch on on Election Day

    Although the White House isn’t up for grabs during the U.S. midterm elections on Tuesday, there are candidates for federal, state and local positions on the ballot that affect central Indiana residents in any number of ways.U.S. Sen. Todd Young, a Republican, is defending his seat from Tom McDermott, the Democratic mayor of Hammond, and Libertarian candidate James Sceniak, a behavioral therapist. Some polls have shown the race between Young and McDermott to be surprisingly close, given Young’s name recognition and massive advantage in fundraising.
    On the state level, there’s a headline-grabbing contest between Republican Diego Morales and Democrat Destiny Wells for secretary of state. Morales has been hit by several troubling allegations in recent months, including accusations of sexual misconduct and embellishing his military record.There’s a fascinating race shaping up in Indiana Senate District 31, which includes the Geist area, Lawrence and the city of Fishers. The incumbent, Republican Kyle Walker, has outraised Democrat opponent Jocelyn Vare many times over, but at least one poll shows this race as a toss-up.
    And in Indianapolis, Marion County Prosecutor Ryan Mears, a Democrat, faces a tough challenge from Republican Cyndi Carrasco. She claims Mears has been soft on violent criminals and she has raised an impressive amount of money to get her message out.For this week’s edition of the IBJ Podcast, host Mason King is joined by two colleagues from the IBJ newsroom to dig deeper into the four races: Peter Blanchard, who covers politics and state government, and Greg Weaver, IBJ’s government and politics editor.
    The IBJ Podcast is brought to you by Taft.

    • 32 min
    Ben Lytle on navigating coming disruptions in tech, culture

    Ben Lytle on navigating coming disruptions in tech, culture

    The guest for this week’s IBJ Podcast is Ben Lytle, whom longtime residents will remember as the former CEO of Indianapolis-based health insurer Anthem. He captained the strategy that turned Anthem into one of the largest health insurers in the nation and a publicly traded firm on the New York Stock Exchange. He also founded, took public and sold the insurance brokerage Accordia.
    But don’t think of Lytle as a career corporate guy. He started his career as an expert in technology and information systems. He’s an entrepreneur at heart and in recent years has co-founded two companies with his son Hugh—both related to health care.
    But he’s not interested in talking about the past. He wants to discuss the next 30 years, a period he expects to be filled with mind-boggling changes in the ways we work and live. The pace of life will continue to accelerate and become more turbulent. He says institutions such as government, education, religion, news media and corporate America will be disrupted and become less reliable. So he has written a book titled “The Potentialist: Your Future in the New Reality of the Next 30 Years.” Its purpose is to help us—and especially people at the beginning of their careers—develop the skills and mindset necessary to succeed in that environment.
    He joined podcast host Mason King to discuss the book and how we can thrive alongside incredible change as we live longer, work longer and develop more intimate relationships with technology.
    The IBJ Podcast is brought to you by Taft.

     

    • 46 min
    Pete The Planner has a frank message on accepting your future demise

    Pete The Planner has a frank message on accepting your future demise

    IBJ columnist and frequent IBJ Podcast guest Pete “The Planner” Dunn had a piece in the Oct. 14 issue with an uncharacteristically sharp rebuke for a reader who was woefully uninsured. IBJ Podcast host Mason King took it to heart, because he has long avoided getting life insurance, despite being in his 50s, married and the father of a 6-year-old.
    But he is far from alone in wanting to avoid acknowledging the need to plan for one’s own demise. Dunn’s take is that life insurance is the foundation of good financial planning, as well as being a good spouse and parent. In the latest edition of the IBJ Podcast, King and Dunn dive into some the big questions that usually come up when one finally addresses this dark elephant in the room, including how much life insurance is necessary.
    The IBJ Podcast is brought to you by Taft.

    • 36 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
36 Ratings

36 Ratings

Kthomasjr ,

Great insight

Mason and his team provide a fantastic overview of what is happening here in Indianapolis. While the intent is business based, I feel like this podcast is the only way I find out the context and history of what is happening here in Indy. Great job and keep it up

ReportThis505 ,

The voice of Indianapolis

IBJ’s first venture into the podcasting world successfully continues a growing need for podcast reporting at the local level. Whether a listener is commuting downtown, sipping their morning coffee or working at their desk, the funky intro beat appropriately ushers them into the day’s top news story. Solid interviews introduce the listener to story subjects and the reporters who break the story. Host Mason King is a smooth moderating talking head who asks the right questions to journalists. However, the podcast is missing an overview of other top IBJ stories. My personal taste for news podcasts include a list of quick news bits from the day’s paper at the beginning or end of a podcast. Maybe a quick sound bite of an interview to accompany the news bits too. Although, I just listened to the podcast about the Indiana Pacers Bike Share program and loved how the episode interviewed one of the sources. Even though it could have benefitted from King’s direction, Scholette’s interview with the program director stood out from previous episodes because it gives a source of the story a voice as well. Perhaps interviewing sources could become a staple for future episodes? Originally from around South Bend, the bike share story in particular draws parallels with the increase in scooter and bike share programs around ND. The program subjects such as the midterm elections speak in accordance to Indianapolis, but like every local area, some subjects contribute to the national conversation. Kudos to IBJ for starting on the right foot and getting ahead of the curve. The Indy Star and other local media need to be taking notes.

Top Podcasts In News

Rachel Maddow, MSNBC
The New York Times
MSW Media
NPR
The Daily Wire
True Crime Today

You Might Also Like

Inside INdiana Business
Inside INdiana Business, Indiana's Business News Leader
Axios
The New York Times
The Wall Street Journal & Gimlet
Freakonomics Radio + Stitcher