199 episodes

Columbia Journalism Review's mission is to encourage excellence in journalism in the service of a free society.

The Kicke‪r‬ Columbia Journalism Review

    • News
    • 4.6 • 57 Ratings

Columbia Journalism Review's mission is to encourage excellence in journalism in the service of a free society.

    “They forget about you:” The media advice Parkland parents give to mass shooting survivors

    “They forget about you:” The media advice Parkland parents give to mass shooting survivors

    Joaquin Oliver was murdered in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting. His parents, Manuel and Patricia Oliver, recognize a pattern, both in how the US media covers mass shootings by rote, and in how Americans are able to look away once the news cycle ends.

    On this week’s Kicker, the Olivers, who founded Change The Ref, a nonprofit that works to raise awareness about mass shootings through reducing the influence of the NRA at the federal level, and Kyle Pope, editor and publisher of CJR, discuss how the media can drive urgency in the fight for gun control.

    Please visit inevitablenews.com to sign up for our virtual Gun Violence News Summit, which takes place on Tuesday, April 6. Join Kyle, the Olivers, and industry leaders from The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Trace, The Guardian, and others to determine a path forward in the face of never-ending gun violence and mass shootings.

    • 26 min
    America does not know what a mass shooting looks like

    America does not know what a mass shooting looks like

    In August 2019, days after 32 people died in the El Paso and Dayton mass shootings, our host Kyle Pope spoke with John Temple. Temple was the editor of Denver’s Rocky Mountain News when the Columbine massacre changed America’s perception of safety forever.

    Temple told us about the photos he decided not to run that day in 1999, and the one he did, which confirmed a child’s death before police spoke with the mother. In the wake of the horror in El Paso and Dayton, Temple’s thoughts were on the Civil Rights movement, on the fight for abolition—the times in our history when journalists have taken a moral stand.

    As we take stock of the devastation in Atlanta and Boulder, and of the ways in which the news cycle failed, especially Atlanta’s victims, here again are John Temple and Kyle Pope.

    • 23 min
    Racism, Atlanta, and the race for a narrative

    Racism, Atlanta, and the race for a narrative

    In the wake of the shootings in Atlanta this week, the media has focused on the killer’s story and struggled to explain why the attacks were racist. The process has dehumanized the victims.

    On this week’s Kicker, Diana Lu, who writes about Asian American culture and coverage, and Kent Ono, a scholar of Media and Asian American Studies at the University of Utah, where he studies racial representation and Asian Americans in the media, join Kyle Pope, editor and publisher of CJR. They discuss the coverage of the horror in Atlanta so far, and the origins of anti-Asian racism and sexism in the American press.

    • 33 min
    Pandemic: Why is it so hard to say there’s hope?

    Pandemic: Why is it so hard to say there’s hope?

    Since the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic, most media coverage has focused on the ongoing physical health disaster and the need to convince readers and elected officials to take action. But the coverage is also a chronic source of trauma. Now that there is some good news interspersed with the tragedy, we struggle to find a balance.

    Dr. Alison Holman is a health psychologist and professor at the University of California Irvine’s Sue & Bill Gross School of Nursing, whose work focuses on exposure to traumatic events such as Ebola outbreaks, the Boston Marathon bombing, and, most recently, Covid-19. On this week’s Kicker, Holman joins Kyle Pope, editor and publisher of CJR, to discuss journalism’s impact on readers’ mental health, and why traumatic coverage can fail to motivate change.

    • 22 min
    Toxic: A break in the Cuomo fever dream

    Toxic: A break in the Cuomo fever dream

    Refusing to learn female reporters’ names, to speak on the record, to refrain from embarrassing comments. The Andrew Cuomo that political reporters know is entirely different from the pandemic persona during the worst moments of the coronavirus crisis.

    On this week’s Kicker, Josefa Velásquez, the Albany reporter for THE CITY, who has covered Cuomo for a decade, and Michael Powell, a New York Times national reporter who covered the collapse of both Rudy Giuliani and Elliot Spitzer, join Kyle Pope, editor and publisher of CJR, to describe the Cuomo persona that has been an open secret.

    • 28 min
    Michael Tubbs on the politics of disinformation, racism, and news deserts

    Michael Tubbs on the politics of disinformation, racism, and news deserts

    Last year, Michael Tubbs was the focus of an HBO documentary, "Stockton On My Mind," that followed his experience trying to reinvent Stockton, California as the city’s first African-American mayor. Within a few months, however, with his campaign for re-election coming up, Tubbs was subjected to a targeted disinformation campaign, by a fake news website called the 209 Times. Named for the area code of Stockton, the 209 Times claims to be "an independent community driven grassroots news source." In reality, it functions as a misinformation machine, trading on the relatively high levels of trust in local press outlets to spread lies about Tubbs and play on voters' racist biases. Come November, Tubbs was unseated. He joins us today on The Kicker, speaking with CJR contributor Akintunde Ahmad about disinformation, news deserts, racism, and what he's up to now.

    • 22 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
57 Ratings

57 Ratings

RoseIrby ,

Thought provoking interviews

Thoroughly enjoy all the episodes. Thank you for providing quality programming.

Spud Hereford ,

good content, when it's audible

Too much of these episodes is unintelligible. I turned off the interview with Masha Gessen because I couldn't understand half of what she said.
Don't know if the fault is on the sending or receiving end, but folks, it's about time for every journalist to understand how to make a decent broad/pod cast.

Jodeshab ,

Get a mic

Decent content, but the audio quality of the host is so poor, really unprofessional. It sounds like he's recording into a laptop microphone from like three feet away, almost unintelligible.

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