150 episodes

Join The New Yorker’s writers and editors for reporting, insight, and analysis of the most pressing political issues of our time. On Mondays, David Remnick, the editor of The New Yorker, presents conversations and feature stories about current events. On Wednesdays, the senior editor Tyler Foggatt goes deep on a consequential political story via far-reaching interviews with staff writers and outside experts. And, on Fridays, the staff writers Susan B. Glasser, Jane Mayer, and Evan Osnos discuss the latest developments in Washington and beyond, offering an encompassing understanding of this moment in American politics.

The Political Scene | The New Yorker The New Yorker

    • News
    • 4.2 • 3K Ratings

Join The New Yorker’s writers and editors for reporting, insight, and analysis of the most pressing political issues of our time. On Mondays, David Remnick, the editor of The New Yorker, presents conversations and feature stories about current events. On Wednesdays, the senior editor Tyler Foggatt goes deep on a consequential political story via far-reaching interviews with staff writers and outside experts. And, on Fridays, the staff writers Susan B. Glasser, Jane Mayer, and Evan Osnos discuss the latest developments in Washington and beyond, offering an encompassing understanding of this moment in American politics.

    Is Being a Politician the Worst Job in the World?

    Is Being a Politician the Worst Job in the World?

    On July 4th—while the U.S. celebrates its break from Britain—voters in the United Kingdom will go to the polls and, according to all predictions, oust the current government. The Conservative Party has been in power for fourteen years, presiding over serious economic decline and widespread discontent. The narrow, contentious referendum to break away from the European Union, sixty per cent of Britons now think, was a mistake. Yet the Labour Party shows no inclination to reverse or even mitigate Brexit. If the Conservatives have destroyed their reputation, why won’t Labour move boldly to change the direction of the U.K.? Is the U.K. hopeless? David Remnick is joined by Rory Stewart, who spent nine years as a Conservative Member of Parliament, and now co-hosts the podcast “The Rest Is Politics.” He left the government prior to Brexit and wrote his best-selling memoir, “How Not to Be a Politician,” which pulls no punches in describing the soul-crushing sham of serving in office. “It’s not impostor syndrome,” Stewart tells Remnick. “You are literally an impostor, and you’re literally on television all the time claiming to understand things you don’t understand and claiming to control things you don’t control.”

    • 35 min
    Hunter Biden’s Conviction and Trump’s Risk to the Justice Department in 2024

    Hunter Biden’s Conviction and Trump’s Risk to the Justice Department in 2024

    The Washington Roundtable: Susan B. Glasser, Jane Mayer, and Evan Osnos analyze the impact of Hunter Biden’s criminal conviction and how the trial turned the spotlight on the Biden family’s private struggles through grief and addiction. Plus, how Trump supporters are waging an attack on the justice system and making its integrity one of the core issues of the 2024 Presidential election.This week’s reading:
    “Happy Seventy-eighth Birthday, Mr. Ex-President,” by Susan B. Glasser
    “Is Hunter Biden a Scapegoat or a Favored Son?” by Katy Waldman
    “Hunter Biden and the Mechanics of the ‘Scandal Industrial Complex,’ ” with Susan B. Glasser, Jane Mayer, and Evan Osnos
    To discover more podcasts from The New Yorker, visit newyorker.com/podcasts. To send in feedback on this episode, write to themail@newyorker.com with “The Political Scene” in the subject line.

    • 36 min
    Biden’s Executive Order on Immigration and the Politically “Toxic” Puzzle of the Border

    Biden’s Executive Order on Immigration and the Politically “Toxic” Puzzle of the Border

    The New Yorker writers Stephania Taladrid and Jonathan Blitzer join Tyler Foggatt to unpack President Biden’s stringent new executive order on asylum and the border. They discuss the strained diplomatic relations between the United States and Mexico and the political calculations underpinning Biden’s decision, and imagine what negotiations between Donald Trump and Mexican President-elect Claudia Sheinbaum would look like. This week’s reading:
    “Will Mexico Decide the U.S. Election?,” by Stephania Taladrid 
    “What’s Behind Joe Biden’s Harsh New Executive Order on Immigration?” by Jonathan Blitzer
    To discover more podcasts from The New Yorker, visit newyorker.com/podcasts. To send feedback on this episode, write to themail@newyorker.com.

    • 38 min
    Senator Raphael Warnock on America’s “Moral and Spiritual Battle”

    Senator Raphael Warnock on America’s “Moral and Spiritual Battle”

    When Raphael Warnock was elected to the Senate from Georgia in the 2020 election, he made history a couple of times over. He became the first Black Democrat elected to the Senate from the Deep South. At the same time, that victory—alongside Jon Ossoff’s—flipped both of Georgia’s Senate seats from Republican to Democrat. Once thought of as solidly red, Georgia has become a closely watched swing state that President Biden can’t afford to lose in November, and Warnock is a key ally. He dismisses polls that show younger Black voters are leaning toward Trump in higher numbers than older voters; Biden’s record as President, he thinks—including a reported sixty per cent increase in Black wealth since the pandemic—will motivate strong turnout. Warnock returns to Atlanta every Sunday to preach at Ebenezer Baptist Church, where he remains senior pastor, and he thinks of the election as a “moral and spiritual battle.” “Are we a nation that can send from the South a Black man and a Jewish man to the Senate?” he asks. “Or are we that nation that rises up in violence as we witness the demographic changes in our country and the struggle for a more inclusive Republic?” 

    • 21 min
    A G.O.P. Strategist on the Republican Voters Who Could Abandon Trump

    A G.O.P. Strategist on the Republican Voters Who Could Abandon Trump

    The Washington Roundtable: Susan B. Glasser and Jane Mayer speak with Sarah Longwell, a longtime G.O.P. strategist and publisher of the Bulwark. Longwell has conducted focus groups across the country for the past eight years, and her research provides an unparalleled look at what motivates certain Republican voters to stay with Trump and what causes others to abandon him. She’s applying that research to persuade a segment of Republican voters to change their vote to Biden, now that Trump has become a convicted felon. What can Democrats learn from her efforts, and from the Republican Party’s messaging tactics?This week’s reading:
    “Fighting Trump on the Beaches,” by Susan. B Glasser
    “The Trials of a Never Trump Republican,” by Susan B. Glasser
    “Joe Biden’s Last Campaign,” by Evan Osnos
    To discover more podcasts from The New Yorker, visit newyorker.com/podcasts. To send in feedback on this episode, write to themail@newyorker.com with “The Political Scene” in the subject line.

    • 34 min
    What Do We Know About How the World Might End?

    What Do We Know About How the World Might End?

    The New Yorker staff writer Rivka Galchen joins Tyler Foggatt to discuss a class at the University of Chicago with a tantalizingly dark title: “Are We Doomed?” It’s in the interdisciplinary field of existential risk, which studies the threats posed by climate change, nuclear warfare, and artificial intelligence. Galchen, who spent a semester observing the course and its students, considers how to contend with this bleak future, and how to understand the young people who may inherit it. This week’s reading:
    “Are We Doomed? Here’s How to Think About It,” by Rivka Galchen 
    “It’s a Climate Election Now,” by Bill McKibben
    To discover more podcasts from The New Yorker, visit newyorker.com/podcasts. To send feedback on this episode, write to themail@newyorker.com.

    • 30 min

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
3K Ratings

3K Ratings

sfncar ,

Please tell Sarah

that dems talk and reps throw things. That’s just the way it is. Democrats are nice folks — Republicans aren’t. Sorry to be so blunt but if you don’t get that you haven’t been paying attention. That being said, I agree that Sarah knows her stuff. But as long as she’s going to complain about dems not acting the way she thinks they should I’m just going to go listen somewhere else that’s worthwhile. Bye…

LauraCouch ,

Calm, wise, intelligent and informative

I’m a fan of left-leaning political podcasts, and I never miss an episode of this one. Susan Glaser and Jane Mayer, especially, are consistently wise and thoughtful. If everyone out there listened to them, we’d live in a more reassuring world.

Amateur Pol Hack ,

Dedicated listener

Three of the best political analysts on the beat. Never miss their weekly podcasts. If you want to know the insights and implications of the latest political issues of the day, The Political Scene is the place to go

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