150 episodes

Join The New Yorker’s writers and editors for reporting, insight, and analysis of the most pressing political issues of our time. On Mondays, David Remnick, the editor of The New Yorker, presents conversations and feature stories about current events. On Wednesdays, the senior editor Tyler Foggatt goes deep on a consequential political story via far-reaching interviews with staff writers and outside experts. And, on Fridays, the staff writers Susan B. Glasser, Jane Mayer, and Evan Osnos discuss the latest developments in Washington and beyond, offering an encompassing understanding of this moment in American politics.

The Political Scene | The New Yorker The New Yorker

    • News
    • 4.2 • 3K Ratings

Join The New Yorker’s writers and editors for reporting, insight, and analysis of the most pressing political issues of our time. On Mondays, David Remnick, the editor of The New Yorker, presents conversations and feature stories about current events. On Wednesdays, the senior editor Tyler Foggatt goes deep on a consequential political story via far-reaching interviews with staff writers and outside experts. And, on Fridays, the staff writers Susan B. Glasser, Jane Mayer, and Evan Osnos discuss the latest developments in Washington and beyond, offering an encompassing understanding of this moment in American politics.

    Trump’s Triumphant R.N.C. and Biden’s Dilemma

    Trump’s Triumphant R.N.C. and Biden’s Dilemma

    The Washington Roundtable: Susan B. Glasser, Jane Mayer, and Evan Osnos discuss takeaways from the Republican National Convention, which Glasser reports had the feeling of “a very polite Midwestern cult meeting.” Plus, Donald Trump's selection of J. D. Vance as his running mate and the mounting pressure for President Biden to drop out of the race.This week’s reading:
    “Donald Trump’s Second Coming,” by Susan B. Glasser
    “Doctors Are Increasingly Worried About Biden,” by Dhruv Khullar
    “The Rise of the New Right at the Republican National Convention,” by Benjamin Wallace-Wells
    “Are We Already Moving On from the Assassination Attempt on Trump?” by Jay Caspian Kang
    “The Paralysis of the Democratic Party,” by Isaac Chotiner
    “Why Donald Trump Picked J. D. Vance for Vice-President,” by Benjamin Wallace-Wells
    “Bernie Sanders Wants Joe Biden to Stay in the Race,” by Isaac Chotiner
    “Trump, Unity, and MAGA Miracles at the R.N.C.,” by Antonia Hitchens
    To discover more podcasts from The New Yorker, visit newyorker.com/podcasts. To send in feedback on this episode, write to themail@newyorker.com with “The Political Scene” in the subject line.

    • 36 min
    A Dispatch from the Republican National Convention

    A Dispatch from the Republican National Convention

    The New Yorker contributing writer Antonia Hitchens calls Tyler Foggatt from Milwaukee to offer some details and observations from the first night of the Republican National Convention, at which Donald Trump was formally nominated to be the G.O.P.’s 2024 Presidential nominee. An assassination attempt on the former President over the weekend only heightened the messianic feeling that surrounds Trump, and gave a strange poignancy to the anointing of J. D. Vance as Trump’s running mate and the potential next leader of the MAGA movement, Hitchens says. This week’s reading:
    “Trump, Unity, and MAGA Miracles at the R.N.C.,” by Antonia Hitchens
    “A Nation Inflamed,” by David Remnick
    “Why Donald Trump Picked J. D. Vance for Vice-President,” by Benjamin Wallace-Wells
    To discover more podcasts from The New Yorker, visit newyorker.com/podcasts. To send feedback on this episode, write to themail@newyorker.com.

    • 23 min
    Julián Castro on the Biden Problem, and What the Democratic Party Got Wrong

    Julián Castro on the Biden Problem, and What the Democratic Party Got Wrong

    The panic that gripped Democrats during and after President Biden’s performance in the June debate against Donald Trump didn’t come out of nowhere. In January of last year, the Radio Hour produced an episode about President Biden’s age, and the concerns that voters were already expressing. But no nationally prominent Democratic politician was willing to challenge Biden in the primaries. After the debate, Julián Castro was one of the first prominent Democrats to say that Biden should withdraw from the race, and he went on to tell MSNBC’s Alex Wagner that potential Democratic rivals and even staffers “got the message” that their careers would be “blackballed” if they challenged him. Castro—who came up as the mayor of San Antonio, and then served as President Obama’s Secretary for Housing and Urban Development—ran against Biden in the Presidential primary for the 2020 election. He talks with David Remnick about how we got here, and what the Democratic Party should have done differently. 

    • 27 min
    The Great Democratic Party Freakout of 2024

    The Great Democratic Party Freakout of 2024

    The Washington Roundtable: Susan B. Glasser, Jane Mayer, and Evan Osnos discuss President Joe Biden’s struggle to retain voters’ confidence in his bid for reëlection and his animosity toward the “élites” he says are insisting that he step down. Plus, Donald Trump’s campaign strategy amid Democratic turmoil and ahead of the Republican National Convention in Milwaukee.“The problem is the meta-narrative, which seems to be centered on: Will Biden faceplant or won’t he?,” Jane Mayer says. “And, so long as that’s the narrative, the narrative is not on Donald Trump and the threat to democracy that he poses.”This week’s reading:
    “Joe Biden’s Less-Than-Awful Press Conference Does Not Mean Everything Is Now O.K.,” by Susan B. Glasser
    “The Controlled Normalcy of Kamala Harris’s Trip to Las Vegas,” by Antonia Hitchens
    “A Congressional Democrat Explains Why He’s Standing with Biden,” by Isaac Chotiner
    “Joe Biden’s Cynical Turn Against the Press,” by Jay Caspian Kang 
    “Joe Biden Is Fighting Back—but Not Against Trump, Really,” by Benjamin Wallace-Wells
    To discover more podcasts from The New Yorker, visit newyorker.com/podcasts. To send in feedback on this episode, write to themail@newyorker.com with “The Political Scene” in the subject line.

    • 42 min
    The Case for Using the Twenty-fifth Amendment on Biden

    The Case for Using the Twenty-fifth Amendment on Biden

    The New Yorker contributor and Harvard Law professor Jeannie Suk Gersen joins Tyler Foggatt to discuss a once obscure constitutional provision that allows Cabinet members to remove an unfit President from office. Gersen believes it’s time to use it on Biden. “The Twenty-fifth amendment was designed for a situation in which the President may not recognize his own impairment,” she says.    This week’s reading:
    “This Is What the Twenty-fifth Amendment Was Designed For,” by Jeannie Suk Gersen
    “The Reckoning of Joe Biden,” by David Remnick
    “Joe Biden Is Fighting Back—but Not Against Trump, Really,” by Benjamin Wallace-Wells
    To discover more podcasts from The New Yorker, visit newyorker.com/podcasts. To send feedback on this episode, write to themail@newyorker.com.

    • 37 min
    John Fetterman’s Move to the Right on Israel

    John Fetterman’s Move to the Right on Israel

    Many Democrats saw John Fetterman as a progressive beacon: a Rust Belt Bernie Sanders who—with his shaved head, his hoodie, and the Zip Code of Braddock, Pennsylvania—could rally working-class white voters to the Democratic Party. But at least on one issue, Fetterman is veering away from the left of his party, and even from centrists like Majority Leader Chuck Schumer: Israel’s war in Gaza. Fetterman has taken a line that is not just sympathetic to Israel after the October 7th attack by Hamas; he seems to justify the civilian death toll Israel has inflicted on Gaza. “When you have that kind of an evil, or that kind of a movement that came out of a society,” he told Benjamin Wallace-Wells, “whether it was Nazi Germany or imperial Japan or the Confederacy here in the South, that kind of movement has to be destroyed. . . . that’s why Atlanta had to burn.” Wallace-Wells shares excerpts from his interviews with Fetterman in a conversation with David Remnick, and they discuss how Fetterman’s support for Israel is driving a wedge among Pennsylvania voters, who will be critical to the outcome of the Presidential election.

    • 18 min

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
3K Ratings

3K Ratings

Lightbulbteeth ,

Great show

Always intelligent and focused, with an insiders view of politics. I only wish it was more frequent.

LGillee ,

Triumphant???

I have no words for the title of this podcast. Which is why I won’t be listening.

Timbuktu! ,

My favorite political podcast

Especially the Friday evening roundtable with Jane Mayer, Susan Glasser and Evan Osnos

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