53 episodes

Today, the art of celebrity doesn't look like it used to. Now, it's all about betting on yourself and expanding your personal brand—sometimes even beyond your comfort zone. Few understand the art of rebounding your life better than Williams, now an author, entrepreneur and ESPN host. Each week, he'll go deep with heavy-hitters from the worlds of sports, entertainment, and pop culture to understand the principles of faith, vision, and grit they live by in order to see past doubt and build their empires. From rappers-to-moguls, to talk show hosts-turned-CEOs, you'll learn the ways that successful people define, push, and conquer their limits.

The Limits with Jay Williams The Limits

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.5 • 137 Ratings

Today, the art of celebrity doesn't look like it used to. Now, it's all about betting on yourself and expanding your personal brand—sometimes even beyond your comfort zone. Few understand the art of rebounding your life better than Williams, now an author, entrepreneur and ESPN host. Each week, he'll go deep with heavy-hitters from the worlds of sports, entertainment, and pop culture to understand the principles of faith, vision, and grit they live by in order to see past doubt and build their empires. From rappers-to-moguls, to talk show hosts-turned-CEOs, you'll learn the ways that successful people define, push, and conquer their limits.

    Remix: Brian Flores and Colman Domingo on Black America

    Remix: Brian Flores and Colman Domingo on Black America

    This season on The Limits, host Jay Williams has spoken to some incredibly successful people. But no matter how famous they've become or how high they've risen on the corporate ladder, they always circle back to the role of race in their lives and their industries. In this final episode of our Remix series, Jay shares two conversations from The Limits Plus about being Black in America that have really stuck with him: with actor Colman Domingo and football coach Brian Flores, who sued the NFL for racial discrimination.

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    • 18 min
    Ryan Clark remembers nearly losing the Super Bowl: "I had tears in my eyes"

    Ryan Clark remembers nearly losing the Super Bowl: "I had tears in my eyes"

    Today, we're featuring an episode of a new podcast called In the Moment. Each week, an elite athlete talks about career defining moments in their lives and what it took to get there.

    During the 2007 NFL Season, Steelers safety Ryan Clark was pulled off a plane after a team loss in Denver Colorado and rushed to the hospital. Clark would later have his gallbladder and part of his spleen removed due to a medical condition caused by the sickle cell trait.

    "I laid on the floor," Clark told David Greene, "if I could just numb myself a little bit, the pain will stop."

    Just one year later, Ryan Clark and the 2008 Steelers defense were the best in the NFL. "We walked into every stadium saying people are gonna have trouble beating us, because they can't score," Clark said.

    Pittsburgh was the favorite going into their Super Bowl 43 matchup against Kurt Warner and the Arizona Cardinals. But the game was anything but easy for that Steelers defense. They let up a late fourth quarter comeback.

    "I had tears in my eyes because I was like: 'This is how we'll always be remembered,'" Clark said.

    After a miraculous touchdown from Ben Roethlisberger to Santonio Holmes, the Steelers beat the Cardinals 27-23. For Clark, it was so much more than a win.

    "It was the first time I had exhaled or relaxed in over a year," he said.

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    • 42 min
    Remix: Niecy Nash and Colton Underwood on love

    Remix: Niecy Nash and Colton Underwood on love

    This month on The Limits, we're pulling together some of our favorite conversations from The Limits Plus that were only available to subscribers – until now. In this week's Remix episode, host Jay Williams talks about love: not just romantic love or family love, but loving yourself. Jay hears inspiring stories from two guests who learned to accept themselves, and who they love, unapologetically: actress Niecy Nash and NFL player turned reality TV star Colton Underwood.

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    • 13 min
    Remix: Megan Rapinoe, Magic Johnson, and Coach K on athletic excellence

    Remix: Megan Rapinoe, Magic Johnson, and Coach K on athletic excellence

    For the next few weeks on The Limits, we're pulling together some of our favorite conversations from The Limits Plus that were only available to subscribers – until now.

    In this week's Remix episode: Every magic moment on the court or the field actually represents a lot of hard work and discipline. So what makes a player truly great? Host Jay Williams asks his mentor Coach Mike Krzyzewski (better known as Coach K), and legendary athletes Megan Rapinoe and Magic Johnson.

    Follow Jay on Instagram and Twitter. Email us at thelimits@npr.org.

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    • 24 min
    Remix: Kelly Rowland and Denzel Curry on fame

    Remix: Kelly Rowland and Denzel Curry on fame

    For the next few weeks on The Limits, we're pulling together some of our favorite conversations from The Limits Plus that were only available to subscribers – until now.

    In this week's Remix episode, host Jay Williams – a star basketball player turned TV commentator – reflects on the downsides of hyper-visibility with two musical artists who have seen it all: Kelly Rowland, who became famous as a teenager as a member of Destiny's Child; and Denzel Curry, a pioneer of 'SoundCloud rap' and one of the brightest young talents in hip hop.

    Follow Jay on Instagram and Twitter. Email us at thelimits@npr.org.

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    • 17 min
    Remix: Dave Zirin, Michele Roberts, and Stephen A. Smith on sports and politics

    Remix: Dave Zirin, Michele Roberts, and Stephen A. Smith on sports and politics

    For the next few weeks on The Limits, we're pulling together some of our favorite conversations from The Limits Plus that were only available to subscribers – until now.

    There may be no moment more defining in the last decade of sports than when Colin Kaepernick took a knee during the National Anthem. But Kap isn't the only athlete learning to speak out on important issues. In this week's Remix episode, host Jay Williams discusses the intersection of sports and politics with sports analysts Dave Zirin and Stephen A. Smith, and Michele Roberts, former head of the National Basketball Players Association.

    Follow Jay on Instagram and Twitter. Email us at thelimits@npr.org.

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    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
137 Ratings

137 Ratings

Dr_VUG_DC ,

Good, but can be better.

This one is easy to listen to and works as advertised. You learn a lot about each person that’s interviewed and Jay allows them to tell their come-up stories. Jay does engage the interviewees, but Jay also has a passive interview style which compounds on top a passive podcast. If that’s something that doesn’t bother you then it’s going to be all good. If so, then this podcast will sound like a series of job interviews where the interviewer only asks the easy questions: what are your qualifications and give examples of how you persevere in difficult times.

Now, I’m not saying Jay should be digging up dirt or asking gotcha questions. But we’re generally talking about how people of color navigate a system that works against them, and still came out on top. I think it would add more weight to tell stories in that light. Perhaps, there can be more research done on the interviewees and the systems that they’ve had to navigate. This research can be used by Jay to periodically jump in and directly provide context to the listener. To really hit home on how those limits were met and exceeded.

Queen of the OC ,

70 year old

Jay Williams has one of the best podcasts on the NPR network, No, he just has one of the best podcasts, period. The education he delivers is outstanding, the guests he has on his show are great. I enjoy expanding my perspective, even at the age of 70. Stay Safe Be Healthy.

sista_redd ,

Jay’s a Great Communicator❤️

Last week, I discovered this podcast and it’s easily become one of favorite podcasts. Jay seems to really care about his guests and asks the most thoughtful questions. Jay, thank you for sharing your great talents in the podcast world.❤️

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