24 episodes

Hosts Daniel Wiser, Jr., and Daniel Kane sit down with the authors of National Affairs essays to discuss pivotal issues — from domestic-policy debates to enduring dilemmas of society and culture — that are often overlooked by American media. Each episode promises a fresh view on contemporary and permanent questions across a wide range of topics, all with one central theme: to help you think a little more clearly.

The National Affairs Podcast American Enterprise Institute

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.5 • 29 Ratings

Hosts Daniel Wiser, Jr., and Daniel Kane sit down with the authors of National Affairs essays to discuss pivotal issues — from domestic-policy debates to enduring dilemmas of society and culture — that are often overlooked by American media. Each episode promises a fresh view on contemporary and permanent questions across a wide range of topics, all with one central theme: to help you think a little more clearly.

    Home Schooling and the Future of Education with Michael McShane

    Home Schooling and the Future of Education with Michael McShane

    The 2019-2020 school year will be remembered as the year we all became home schoolers. But well before the pandemic, the popularity of home schooling exceeded its actual prevalence, as fiscal and logistical challenges often posed insurmountable obstacles for potential home-school families. Guest Michael McShane joins us to discuss the hybrid home-school model, and how it might offer a way to close the gap as families consider their post-pandemic options.
    Michael McShane is the director of national research at EdChoice and author of https://www.amazon.com/Hybrid-Homeschooling-Michael-McShane/dp/1475857977/?tag=natioaffai-20 (Hybrid Homeschooling: A Guide to the Future of Education). Prior to his work in education policy and school-choice advocacy, he worked as a high-school teacher in Montgomery, Alabama.
    This podcast discusses themes from Michael’s essay in the Winter 2021 issue of National Affairs, “https://nationalaffairs.com/publications/detail/blending-home-and-school (Blending Home and School).”

    • 36 min
    Humility Rightly and Wrongly Understood with Elizabeth Corey

    Humility Rightly and Wrongly Understood with Elizabeth Corey

    “Cultural humility” has recently joined diversity, inclusion, equity, and intersectionality in the social-justice lexicon. An entire social movement is hidden in those two words — one that is far from innocuous. To prevent the concept from undermining our educational institutions, we need to see cultural humility for what it really is and understand the challenge it poses to traditional academic ideals. Guest Elizabeth Corey joins us to discuss this politically motivated distortion of the virtue of humility, and to offer the alternative of liberal education.
    *Note: Elizabeth Corey's bio is stated incorrectly on the podcast. She is an associate professor of political science at Baylor University, and the director of Baylor’s Honors Program. She was also a visiting professor at the American Enterprise Institute for the 2018-2019 academic year.
    This podcast discusses themes from Elizabeth’s essay in the Winter 2021 issue of National Affairs, “https://nationalaffairs.com/publications/detail/questioning-cultural-humility (Questioning Cultural Humility).”

    • 28 min
    Trump's Legacy with Casey Burgat and Matt Glassman

    Trump's Legacy with Casey Burgat and Matt Glassman

    What will be Donald Trump’s lasting effects on American politics? Three conventional wisdoms have arisen in response to that question. In one view, Trump was an aberration, and his imprint will fade as President Biden reverses his executive actions and his sad attempts to remain relevant in retirement prove futile. A second view sees Trump as transformative, insisting his unconventional campaigning and governing styles decisively reconstructed the presidency and our broader political culture. A third view asserts Trump was mostly a symptom of larger forces in American and global politics. Guests Casey Burgat and Matt Glassman join us to parse through and weigh these possibilities, and discuss why each view captures a portion of the truth. Trump’s norm breaking and influence on the party system will likely be his most enduring legacy, they argue.
    Casey Burgat is the director of the Legislative Affairs program and an assistant professor at George Washington University’s Graduate School of Political Management. And Matt Glassman is a senior fellow at Georgetown University’s Government Affairs Institute.
    This podcast discusses themes from Casey and Matt’s lead essay in the Winter 2021 issue of National Affairs, “https://nationalaffairs.com/publications/detail/politics-after-trump (Politics After Trump).”

    • 37 min
    Building Bridges to Economic Opportunity with Glenn Hubbard

    Building Bridges to Economic Opportunity with Glenn Hubbard

    The gains from trade and technological advance in recent decades have been enormous. But the transformation has had some downsides, too. These drawbacks have transformed our politics in recent decades, and the economic disaster accompanying the coronavirus pandemic has only magnified them. Defenders of markets have too often sought to dismiss the downsides, while populists point to them as reasons to build walls of protectionism and regulation. Both approaches are forms of denial. Guest Glenn Hubbard joins us to discuss how we can make the most of the benefits of economic dynamism while addressing its costs. Rather than erecting “walls” in pursuit of perpetual economic security and stability, he argues for a policy approach focused on building “bridges” that could better connect those who suffer from economic disruption to the benefits of America’s free-market system.
    https://glennhubbard.net/ (Glenn Hubbard) is the Russell L. Carson Professor of Finance and Economics at Columbia Business School and was chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President George W. Bush. His forthcoming book is titled The Wall and the Bridge (Yale University Press).
    This podcast discusses themes from Glenn’s essay in the Fall 2020 issue of National Affairs, “https://nationalaffairs.com/publications/detail/the-wall-and-the-bridge (The Wall and the Bridge).”

    • 35 min
    The Future of Our Political Parties with Steven Teles

    The Future of Our Political Parties with Steven Teles

    As America’s political parties have been increasingly captured by their ideological extremes in recent decades, the space for cross-party coalition building has shrunk. Some reformers argue that only third parties can help, but this solution has never been realistic in our system. A more practical way forward would require would-be coalition builders to participate more vigorously in party politics, getting their hands dirty in organized faction building. Guest Steven Teles joins us to discuss the prospects for each party’s factions in the aftermath of the 2020 election, and whether stronger factions could lead to a more moderate and deliberative politics.
    https://politicalscience.jhu.edu/directory/steven-teles/ (Steven Teles) is a professor of political science at Johns Hopkins University and a senior fellow at the Niskanen Center. He is also the co-author, along with Robert Saldin, of the book https://www.amazon.com/Never-Trump-Revolt-Conservative-Elites/dp/0190880449 (Never Trump: The Revolt of the Conservative Elites).
    This podcast discusses themes from Steve and Rob’s essay in the Fall 2020 issue of National Affairs, “https://nationalaffairs.com/publications/detail/the-future-is-faction (The Future is Faction).”

    • 46 min
    Can We Trust the Polls? (with Karlyn Bowman)

    Can We Trust the Polls? (with Karlyn Bowman)

    Elections in America and around the world in recent years have raised concerns about the reliability of opinion polling. But the challenges facing the industry go beyond simple reliability and predictive power, revealing a chasm between pollsters and the public they observe that poses a threat to the credibility and usefulness of opinion surveys in our democracy. After the shocking election results in 2016, will Americans find the polls more trustworthy in 2020? Guest Karlyn Bowman joins us to discuss.
    https://www.aei.org/profile/karlyn-bowman/ (Karlyn Bowman) is a senior fellow and research coordinator at the American Enterprise Institute, where she studies trends in American public opinion on a wide variety of social and political topics. She is also the recipient of the Roper Center’s 2020 Warren J. Mitofsky Award for Excellence in Public Opinion Research, one of the highest honors in polling and public opinion.
    This podcast discusses themes from Karlyn’s essay in the Summer 2018 issue of National Affairs, “https://www.nationalaffairs.com/publications/detail/the-trouble-with-polling (The Trouble with Polling).”

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
29 Ratings

29 Ratings

Patriot98 ,

Excellent, in-depth analysis

I learn a lot from every episode.

statedept1515 ,

FIX THE AUDIO

Great guests and great insight, but the audio quality is bad. This is a big enough podcast to get these kind of issues figured out.

Tom44720 ,

Amateur hour

The content of your podcast is irrelevant if the audio has been so poorly recorded that it is painful to try to listen to. It’s too quiet, but more importantly the volume changes from minute to minute and particularly from speaker to speaker. Give a microphone to each participant and put somebody competent in charge of getting the levels right.
I enjoy your journal. If you’re going to have a podcast do it well. I will check back in six months.

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

Listeners Also Subscribed To