10 episodes

Hosts Daniel Wiser, Jr., and Daniel Kane sit down with the authors of National Affairs essays to discuss pivotal issues — from domestic-policy debates to enduring dilemmas of society and culture — that are often overlooked by American media. Each episode promises a fresh view on contemporary and enduring questions across a wide range of topics, all with one central theme: to help you think a little more clearly.

The National Affairs Podcast American Enterprise Institute

    • Society & Culture

Hosts Daniel Wiser, Jr., and Daniel Kane sit down with the authors of National Affairs essays to discuss pivotal issues — from domestic-policy debates to enduring dilemmas of society and culture — that are often overlooked by American media. Each episode promises a fresh view on contemporary and enduring questions across a wide range of topics, all with one central theme: to help you think a little more clearly.

    The crisis of men without work with Nicholas Eberstadt

    The crisis of men without work with Nicholas Eberstadt

    America is in the grip of a gradually building crisis of “worklessness” among men. Unemployment numbers fail to reflect this; the men involved are not even seeking work. But over the last 50 years, the percentage of men not in the labor force has jumped from 3 percent to over 11 percent.







    Most experts argue that this crisis is grounded in decreasing employer demand for labor supplied by America’s least educated workers, which then requires significant improvements in American education to help men get the skills the economy requires. However, guest Nicholas Eberstadt discusses why that view is simply inadequate. It neglects a number of critical features of this crisis — features that could help us better understand and address the ongoing decline of work among men in modern America. 







    Dr. Eberstadt holds the Henry Wendt Chair at AEI, where he researches on demographics, economic development, poverty, and social well-being. He has also served as consultant and adviser for the US government and authored Men Without Work: America’s Invisible Crisis. This podcast discusses concepts from Dr. Eberstadt’s essay in the Winter 2020 issue of National Affairs, “Education and Men without Work.”

    • 51 min
    The China trade shock with Samuel Hammond

    The China trade shock with Samuel Hammond

    Open trade promotes peace and prosperity. But in its abstract form, that clear principle neglects crucial complexities about how trade actually works in practice. As trade tensions with China intensify, America is learning this the hard way. In this episode, guest Samuel Hammond discusses some of those complexities, and what they might say about the future of our labor market and politics. 







    Samuel Hammond is the director of poverty and welfare policy for the Niskanen Center. Previously, he worked as an economist for the government of Canada specializing in rural economic development, and as a graduate research fellow for the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. His research focuses on whether cash transfers help reduce poverty, and how social insurance can complement free markets. This podcast discusses concepts in Sam’s essay from the Fall 2019 issue of National Affairs, “The China Shock Doctrine.”

    • 48 min
    Economic Dynamism: with Oren Cass

    Economic Dynamism: with Oren Cass

    Recently, the term “economic dynamism” has become as popular as the assumption that it is always beneficial. However, guest Oren Cass challenges that view, arguing that we must carefully weigh the costs of economic disruption against its well-known benefits.







    Oren Cass is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, where he addresses issues ranging from the social safety net and environmental regulation to trade and immigration to education and organized labor. He also writes extensively on the nature of climate change and on the process of formulating and evaluating public policy. Cass has written for publications including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal,and National Review, and regularly speaks at universities and before Congress. This podcast discusses concepts from Oren’s essay from the Spring 2019 issue of National Affairs, “Putting Dynamism in its Place.” 

    • 46 min
    Rethinking Medicare: with James Capretta

    Rethinking Medicare: with James Capretta

    Proposals to reform Medicare usually call for adjustments within its existing structure. In this episode, James Capretta joins Devorah and Dan to discuss why this approach does not go far enough. Instead, he outlines a plan for fundamentally rethinking Medicare, which he argues is necessary to address the program’s serious fiscal challenges and detrimental effects on our broader health-care system.







    James C. Capretta is a resident fellow and the Milton Friedman Chair at the American Enterprise Institute. Since joining AEI, he has focused his work on health care, entitlement, and U.S. budget policy, as well as global trends in aging, health, and retirement programs. He also serves as a senior adviser to the Bipartisan Policy Center. This podcast is inspired by Jim’s essay from the Spring 2018 issue of National Affairs, “Rethinking Medicare.” 

    • 47 min
    Matthew Continetti on Irving Kristol

    Matthew Continetti on Irving Kristol

    Profiles of Irving Kristol, the late founder of The Public Interest, have long emphasized his personal qualities and political evolution over his ideas. In this episode of The National Affairs Podcast, Matthew Continetti joins hosts Devorah Goldman and Daniel Wiser, Jr., discussing Kristol’s thoughts on the deep links between politics and religion. They argue that these teachings still hold valuable lessons for us today, as we struggle through cultural conflicts.







    Matthew Continetti is a resident fellow at AEI, where he focuses on American political thought and history. He is also a contributing editor for National Affairs and former editor-in-chief of the Washington Free Beacon. This podcast is inspired by Matt’s essay from the Summer 2014 issue of National Affairs, “The Theological Politics of Irving Kristol.”

    • 46 min
    America’s Cultural Agenda: with Philip Jeffery

    America’s Cultural Agenda: with Philip Jeffery

    Public support of art and culture was an important facet of Cold War diplomacy that has persisted into this century. Yet while such support still exists, it is currently without much direction or purpose. In this episode, Philip Jeffery joins Devorah and Daniel to discuss why now may be the time to end that complacence. Jeffery argues that a particular kind of cultural agenda could help address some thorny contemporary problems. 







    Philip Jeffery is an assistant editor at the Washington Free Beacon. This podcast comes from Phil’s essay from the Summer 2019 issue of National Affairs, “A Cultural Agenda for Our Time.”

    • 52 min

Customer Reviews

Tom44720 ,

Amateur hour

The content of your podcast is irrelevant if the audio has been so poorly recorded that it is painful to try to listen to. It’s too quiet, but more importantly the volume changes from minute to minute and particularly from speaker to speaker. Give a microphone to each participant and put somebody competent in charge of getting the levels right.
I enjoy your journal. If you’re going to have a podcast do it well. I will check back in six months.

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