434 episodes

Looking at cinema's present via its past. The Next Picture Show is a biweekly roundtable by the former editorial team of The Dissolve examining how classic films inspire and inform modern movies. Episodes take a deep dive into a classic film and its legacy in the first half, then compare and contrast that film with a modern successor in the second. Hosted and produced by Genevieve Koski, Keith Phipps, Tasha Robinson and Scott Tobias.

The Next Picture Show Filmspotting Network

    • TV & Film
    • 4.6 • 742 Ratings

Looking at cinema's present via its past. The Next Picture Show is a biweekly roundtable by the former editorial team of The Dissolve examining how classic films inspire and inform modern movies. Episodes take a deep dive into a classic film and its legacy in the first half, then compare and contrast that film with a modern successor in the second. Hosted and produced by Genevieve Koski, Keith Phipps, Tasha Robinson and Scott Tobias.

    Road Warriors, Pt. 1: Mad Max (1979)

    Road Warriors, Pt. 1: Mad Max (1979)

    There’s a lot of narrative road between 1979’s MAD MAX and the new FURIOSA, but in pursuing George Miller’s decades-spanning franchise back to its starting line, we uncover a lot about what fuels this saga beyond the big, loud cars. For example, there are also big, loud motorcycles. But more importantly, there’s a healthy skepticism toward revenge as motivation, an interest in messianic leaders and hyper-verbal antagonists, and an efficient approach to world-building that prizes the visceral feel of a crumbling society over the logistical details thereof. All of that, plus the symbolic richness of this bleak motorized world, come up as we look under the hood of a film that’s quite different from what the MAD MAX saga is today, but no less driven by Miller’s singular vision. And in Feedback, we respond to a much-appreciated listener correction about THE FALL GUY and a similarly appreciated response to a prompt from our DONNIE DARKO episode. 

    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about MAD MAX, FURIOSA,  or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email or voice memo to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Teenage Dreams, Pt. 2 — I Saw the TV Glow

    Teenage Dreams, Pt. 2 — I Saw the TV Glow

    Jane Schoenburn’s I SAW THE TV GLOW is a film whose cultural reference points tend to take the form of vibes more than direct nods. But the writer-director's stated inspiration point in DONNIE DARKO can be seen on both the surface — the  recent-past suburban setting, the teenage outcasts struggling to relate to the world around them — and on a deeper level in the protagonists’ slippery grips on reality and their own identity. In the case of I SAW THE TV GLOW, that takes the shape of a trans narrative, the apparentness and relatability of which we discuss with the help of our special guest Emily St. James, before putting these two films side by side to consider their respective takes on teenage alienation, TV as a drug, and secondary realities that no one else can see. And in Your Next Picture Show we recommend a book trilogy that offers a different but complementary spin on media obsession.

    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about DONNIE DARKO, I SAW THE TV GLOW,  or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email or voice memo to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.

    Next Pairing: George Miller’s FURIOSA and MAD MAX
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 11 min
    Teenage Dreams, Pt. 1 — Donnie Darko

    Teenage Dreams, Pt. 1 — Donnie Darko

    The horror-inflected suburban setting of the new I SAW THE TV GLOW — not to mention writer-director Jane Schoenbrun’s own comments on their inspiration — put us in mind of Richard Kelly’s 2001 cult classic DONNIE DARKO, which also follows a teen protagonist struggling to maintain their grip on reality. We’re joined once again by writer, critic, and friend of the show Emily St. James to discuss how our relationships to both that teen protagonist and the movie named for him have shifted over the years, the film’s prescient religious and political undertones and the intentionality thereof, and why so many of its mysteries remain more compelling without clear answers. And in Feedback, we travel back a few episodes to revisit both a scene from Alex Garland’s CIVIL WAR and the discourse it provoked. 
    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about DONNIE DARKO, I SAW THE TV GLOW,  or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email or voice memo to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 19 min
    Playing the Hits, Pt. 2 — The Fall Guy

    Playing the Hits, Pt. 2 — The Fall Guy

    Like the first film in this pairing, Richard Rush’s 1980 oddity THE STUNT MAN, David Leitch’s new THE FALL GUY utilizes the chaos of a film set as the cover for a crime, not to mention the inspiration for both romance and comedy. THE FALL GUY is a bit more straightforward in its crowd-pleasing intentions, though, to both its benefit and detriment, which we talk through in sharing our reactions to the new film. Then we bring THE STUNT MAN back in to compare its overlapping but distinct ideas about stunt performers who inspire their directors, get romantically involved with their co-workers, and confront their own deaths as a matter of course. And in Your Next Picture Show we offer another pairing of films that have nothing to do with this week’s movies, but which we are nonetheless excited to recommend. 
    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about THE STUNT MAN, THE FALL GUY,  or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email or voice memo to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.

    Next Pairing: Jane Schoenbrunn’s I SAW THE TV GLOW and Richard Kelly’s DONNIE DARKO
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 14 min
    Playing the Hits, Pt. 1 — The Stunt Man

    Playing the Hits, Pt. 1 — The Stunt Man

    While there are countless movies featuring the work of stunt performers, movies that center the experiences of those performers are much more rare, which is part of what motivated former stunt performer David Leitch to make the new THE FALL GUY. One of the standouts on that short list is Richard Rush’s 1980 genre oddity THE STUNT MAN, which uses the experience of its accidental-stuntie protagonist to blur the lines between post-Vietnam reality and moviemaking fantasy in fascinating, sometimes confounding ways. We talk through our interpretations of what it means and whether it works, and come to the conclusion that even when it doesn’t, Peter O’Toole’s performance as a diabolical director manages to hold it all together. Then in Feedback, our recent CHALLENGERS episode inspires a couple of listeners to share their alternate pairing ideas.
    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about THE STUNT MAN, THE FALL GUY,  or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 9 min
    Mixed Doubles, Pt. 2 — Challengers

    Mixed Doubles, Pt. 2 — Challengers

    Justin Kuritzkes, who wrote the screenplay for Luca Guadagnino’s new CHALLENGERS, cites Alfonso Cuarón's coming-of-age classic Y TU MAMÁ TAMBIÉN as a longtime favorite, so it’s unsurprising to see that film’s DNA in this one. CHALLENGERS is far from a remake, though, operating in a very different milieu with very different narrative priorities, both which we discuss along with our generally-positive-to-rapturous reactions to it. Then in Connections we press these two movies’ faces together and make them kiss for our own gratification, and come away from the experience surprised by just how much they share without being much alike at all. And in Your Next Picture Show we consider another, more recent Cuarón film in the context of Y TU MAMÁ TAMBIÉN.
    Please share your comments, thoughts, and questions about Y TU MAMÁ TAMBIÉN, CHALLENGERS,  or anything else in the world of film, by sending an email or voice memo to comments@nextpictureshow.net, or leaving a short voicemail at (773) 234-9730.
    Next Pairing: David Leitch’s THE FALL GUY and Richard Rush’s THE STUNT MAN
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 1 hr 2 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
742 Ratings

742 Ratings

cassidy525 ,

Deep and interesting

Thank you for the deep and interesting conversations. If you want to listen (and think as you listen!) to nuanced, knowledgeable, and complicated analysis- this is the podcast for all cinephiles.

Davin’s farts ,

A fantastic twice a month double feature!

Along with filmspotting, I attribute all of my movie knowledge from the folks on the next picture show. Even if I haven’t seen the movie yet, I listen to this as soon as it appears in my feed.

Z. Roth ,

Spoiler alert

Why do podcast hosts insist on spoiling the endings of movies they are not discussing? To show off knowledge? Luckily I’ve seen Killing of a sacred Deer, for example, before the Poor Things episode clearly explained the twist ending with no warning.

Top Podcasts In TV & Film

The Official Game of Thrones Podcast: House of the Dragon
HBO
House of R
The Ringer
Turning The Tables By Teresa Giudice
Hurrdat Media
Two Ts In A Pod with Teddi Mellencamp and Tamra Judge
iHeartPodcasts
HOTD: A House of the Dragon Podcast
Bald Move
Watch What Crappens
Ben Mandelker & Ronnie Karam | Wondery

You Might Also Like

Filmspotting - Movie Reviews
Filmspotting.net
Blank Check with Griffin & David
Blank Check Productions
Fighting In The War Room: A Movies And Pop Culture Podcast
Katey, Matt, Da7e and David
This Had Oscar Buzz
Joe and Chris
Unspooled
Earwolf, Paul Scheer & Amy Nicholson
The Filmcast
The Filmcast