382 episodes

Winner of Four Outdoor Writers Association of America Excellence in Craft Awards The Outdoor Biz Podcast features inspiring conversations with Outdoor/Adventure Brand Founders and Leaders from Outdoor, Bike, Ski, Adventure Travel, Conservation, Industry Recruiters, Executives and, many others. They talk about their careers, tell inspiring stories, and offer advice and direction on the path you can take to get your job in the industry and grow your Outdoor Career. Hosted by Author, Speaker, and, Adventurer Rick Saez and available wherever you get your podcasts.

The Outdoor Biz Podcast Rick Saez

    • Business
    • 4.9 • 113 Ratings

Winner of Four Outdoor Writers Association of America Excellence in Craft Awards The Outdoor Biz Podcast features inspiring conversations with Outdoor/Adventure Brand Founders and Leaders from Outdoor, Bike, Ski, Adventure Travel, Conservation, Industry Recruiters, Executives and, many others. They talk about their careers, tell inspiring stories, and offer advice and direction on the path you can take to get your job in the industry and grow your Outdoor Career. Hosted by Author, Speaker, and, Adventurer Rick Saez and available wherever you get your podcasts.

    Darrel Larson, International Director of Sawyer Products is committed to bringing clean water to the world. [EP 367]

    Darrel Larson, International Director of Sawyer Products is committed to bringing clean water to the world. [EP 367]

    Welcome to episode 367 of The Outdoor Biz Podcast, brought to you this week by Thrive Market. Today I’m joined by Darrel Larson, International Director of Sawyer Products. Darrell is also the founder of Give Clean Water, a non-profit dedicated to providing clean drinking water around the world.
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    Brought to you by:
    Thrive Market

    Show Notes What was your first exposure to the outdoors?
    [00:00:40] When I was growing up as a kid, my dad loved fishing. And it turns out my dad when he got outta high school, he actually graduated from Oceanside High as well.
    So my dad gets outta high school and he takes a job as a Forest Service ranger up in Lassen Park. Oh, wow. And so my very first recollections when I was growing up as a kid were sitting around, my dad, would take pictures and turn 'em into slides and we had like a slide projector kinda a deal.
    And it's all these pictures of my dad up there fishing for like big brown trout and all the stuff that they were doing their off time. So, so from very early on I kind of got exposed to the outdoors and, beautiful places like Lassen National Park.
    How were you inspired to focus on clean water?
    [00:04:15] Before I was introduced to Sawyer filters, I got training in bio-sand filters, and that was just like, I don't know, it just resonated with me cuz I began to see what a big, giant problem it was around the world.
    And so that just kind of caught my attention. I was like, man, this is something we can solve in our lifetime. And so kind of got it, start there with that house building organization, and then from there, kind of moved on and, became acquainted with Sawyer filters and got involved with starting my own nonprofit that work in the country of Fiji.
    How did you connect with Sawyer?
    [00:05:10] So when I found Sawyer, we had just gotten a lot of our bio-sand filter molds, and I got training in it, got certified in it, and we were gonna bring these filters over to  Fiji.
    And a couple of weeks before, I was going on this trip, and one of my friends said, Hey, did you see these new filters? It just came out, this company called Sawyer, and this was in 2008. And, so I was like, oh, those look really interesting. So I called Sawyer and I asked them if they would send me a couple, cuz I want to test these out.
    Talk a little bit about Give Clean Water. You started that organization, right?
    [00:10:00]  Yeah, so I founded it in 2008. We were really looking at finding a country where could we go where there was a big water need. Of course, they were everywhere. A billion people need clean water. But I wanted to go somewhere where I had some boots-on-the-ground contacts. And a friend of mine grew up in Fiji and he's like, Hey man, you should come to Fiji and, and bring these filters over there.
    So I was like, okay. So we went over and checked it out. I was like dreaming big. these filters could change the world. What if you could change the world? What if you could change a country? Yeah. Fiji's not that big of a country. Less than 900,000 people live in the country, which is like two-thirds of the size of San Diego. So I'm thinking, man, if you could [00:11:20] hit every single village there, what would that look like to change the country and change their lives, et cetera? So that was our beginning.
    Sawyer
    [00:21:00] Our biggest category is gonna be our repellent. Our Permethrin is, [00:21:20] is the golden standard for spraying on your clothes and your gear. And then our Picaridin is big, that's our topical repellent. It's a derivative of, the pepper plant and, it offers the [00:22:00] same protection as Deet, but it's just not harsh. Our newest filter is the [00:25:30] tap filter

    • 47 min
    Bass Fishing, Podcasting, and Building a Community with Pro Angler Angie Scott [EP 366]

    Bass Fishing, Podcasting, and Building a Community with Pro Angler Angie Scott [EP 366]

    Today I’m talking with Pro Angler and Podcaster Angie Scott. Angie is the creator of The Woman Angler & Adventurer podcast. And it's become more than just a podcast. It's a growing community of like-minded women supporting each other through Angie’s Facebook group. It's turning into a movement and the industry IS taking notice!
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    Brought to you by:
    Tee Public
    Show Notes How were you introduced to Fishing? I started fishing before I can even remember honestly. Minnesota is where I grew up and it's just a culture, it seems like, of outdoors people up there.
    And so, my dad had a little aluminum fishing boat and a 40-horsepower motor. He still has that same exact boat and motor to this day, which is pretty unheard of. But, he's mechanical and is able to fix most things when something goes wrong with that motor. But, yeah, so, just grew up doing that.
    When did you begin fishing competitively? So I started that back in 2018. I moved to Nashville back in 1999 and had kind of gotten away from it. I moved down to Nashville and I went to college and then got a job in the music business and that really ended up taking up a lot of my time and kind of pulled me away from, getting out there and fishing. 
    What were you doing in the music business? So I went to a school in Tennessee that has a really good music business program called Middle Tennessee State University. And I was on the business side. They have a production side. If you're wanting to get into like producing records and things like that, then they also have a business side, and that was really where my interests were.
    I really had no agenda as far as what I wanted to do in the business. I just knew I wanted to be in the music business.
    So did that come from family or how, where'd that come from? Yeah, a little bit. So I had an older brother, six years older than me, and that's my only sibling, and he was just really into music growing up.
    So I got this job at Creative Artist Agency and ends up, they're the biggest talent agency in the country. The world maybe.
    I did that for 16 years. And I had an interior office for the majority of that time, and that was tough on somebody who really loves the outdoors.
    I just getting to the point where I'm like, you know, do I really wanna wake up at 65 and have sat behind a desk my whole life? I love going to concerts and meeting cool people, but I don't really wanna do this for the rest of my life. And so that's when I kind of started thinking, what could I do outdoors-oriented? That was when I started working on my captain's license, and started the podcast.
    What inspired the storytelling part of it? I mean, what better way to inspire somebody else to get involved? Then to hear somebody who's out there doing it every day and how they do it, do it. I just think it's a great way to inspire people.
    And also be able to preserve their stories exactly for future generations. is another great, great benefit to it.
    Do you focus mainly on warm-water fishing? I try to cover everything. So I've had a lot of fly anglers on, salt water, I just had a lady on that fishes out of South Carolina offshore quite a bit. so I try to cover everything. I kind of just by default end up covering a lot of bass and freshwater because that's what I do now. But also, you know, when I'm down in Florida, I end up having a lot of. Florida anglers.
    Every now and then I get a West Coast angler on the show. I'd love to get more, more of those. and also Colorado, that region of fly fishing.
    So tell everybody about the woman angler. You offer a ton of resources. How'd you, how'd you develop that format? Or did it [00:20:40] just evolve as you kept adding, offer

    • 47 min
    Kiteboarder Sensi Graves is helping women do badass things [EP 365]

    Kiteboarder Sensi Graves is helping women do badass things [EP 365]

    Imagine a world in which women no longer doubted themselves. a world in which you believed anything was possible and that there were no fears or glass ceilings holding you back? Sensi Graves loves helping women do badass things.
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    You can contact me here: email: rick@theoutdoorbizpodcast.com
    or leave me a message on Speakpipe!
    Brought to you by:
    Tee Public
    Show Notes How were you introduced to the Outdoors I grew up actually 20 minutes down a dirt road in northern California. So in a really rural town in Mendocino County in Northern California. There are 320 people in my town and 50 kids in my high school.
    I grew up on 80 acres and my mom was an avid skier. After she graduated high school, she lived in Utah for a number of years. My Mon and my Dad were ski bums out there, and I've always lived an outdoor life. We weren't allowed to watch TV growing up. I have three brothers and we were always playing outside, always playing games, and thankfully we were taken on ski trips and wakeboarding trips and a lot of outdoor time growing up, and so it's been a part of my blood forever.
    How'd you get into kiteboarding? Kind of a roundabout story. Actually, my mom died when I was 16 and after that my dad, was looking for things to fill that void and he, one summer when I was 18 years old, said, we're going to learn to Kiteboard. And I was like, what? I've never even heard of this before. And he was having us watch some videos and I was like, what? What are we doing? I don't even what you're talking about, but he took my three brothers and me out to North Carolina to a place called Rio Water Sports, which at that time and still is the premier kit board school in the US. And we took a week's worth of lessons. I fell in love with it and actually ended up going back there to coach a few years later as a kite board instructor when I was a junior in college.
    Tell our listeners about professional kiteboarding competitions and how they work. To give listeners a picture, you are essentially wakeboarding but driving your own boat. So you have a harness on your waist, you have 20 meters of lines, and then you have a kite, basically like a big piece of fabric, essentially with an inflatable leading edge. that is pulling you across the water and you're using that kite to generate power with the wind, utilizing the wind to pull you across the water, essentially. So it's like the combination of sailing and wakeboarding. You're doing sailing tacks back and forth. You're utilizing the wind just like sails do.
    And so there are a variety of disciplines within kiteboarding. You have racing just like sailboat racing. You have big jump disciplines, kind of the thing kiteboarding is known for the most and the awe factor is when people go really high in the sky. But it actually takes a lot of skill to jump really high, and so that's another discipline. Then there's freestyle, which is doing tricks in the air, kind of like behind what you would see behind a wakeboarding boat. Back rolls and front rolls and tantrums and various things. And then the discipline that I competed in was park riding. And so that is much like on the snow. You have rails and boxes and things, we have those same features floating in the water.
    You just recently launched a swimmer brand in 2012. What inspired that? I launched that before I became a pro kiteboarder. I launched that when I was coaching kiteboarding. I was in the water every single day, and I quickly grew tired of the swimwear that was on the market because it was really either, one of two categories, really fashion-forward, but didn't say put, or really performance-oriented but wasn't beautiful to wear. So I just had this idea to make something that was that combination of both. I had no experience and no business backgroun

    • 28 min
    The Running Event Follow up with Show Director Christina Henderson [EP 364]

    The Running Event Follow up with Show Director Christina Henderson [EP 364]

    Welcome to episode 364 of The Outdoor Biz Podcast, brought to you this week by The Running Event. Today I’m joined by Christina Henderson, Event Director for The Running Event. The premier conference and trade show for run specialty retailers. Christina and I talk about the recent TRE show in Austin and the debut of their new Switchback space featuring Outdoor brands.
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    or leave me a message on Speakpipe!
    Show Notes So let's talk about 2022 overall. Obviously, it was good. Does the whole team feel that way? Everyone truly walked away feeling very good. So, very positive energy and accomplishment. And of course, there are always things that we can work on and do better, but you know, the team walked away. feeling very proud of what we did and as they should.
    What were your top three wins from the Switchback space? Switchback at the running event was space on the trade show floor, but it was also networking opportunities. We did a breakfast with the Conservation Alliance and we did a trail cleanup. It truly was an experience and, we walked away feeling very happy with what we accomplished in year one.
    What was the feedback from the brands? Our number one objective is can we create a space for business to happen. And, that is what happened in the Switchback space and the TRE space. We have received, very positive feedback from brands in the switchback space and. Saying again, "Hey, we're behind you. This concept is going to work and we will support you moving forward. We found value this year and we believe that there will be even more next year."
    Was there anything you were a little worried about that, but came off as fantastic? The first that comes to mind is our education program. We have heard more feedback on our education program than any other year, and it wasn't by accident. I will say the team this year, we were so deliberate and intentional with every piece, and education was a big focus of ours.
    So as your first time as the head honcho, how'd that feel? It felt great. It really did. You know being on-site, it's my favorite week of the year. There's no question. Just seeing all the smiling faces, all of the energy, people are learning, and truly, my team thrive.
    Follow up with Christina
    Website: https://www.therunningevent.com
    chenderson@divdcom.com
    IG: @cjflenderson

    • 19 min
    Exploring the intersection of outdoor recreation, conservation, and the economy with Matador’s Tim Wenger [EP 363]

    Exploring the intersection of outdoor recreation, conservation, and the economy with Matador’s Tim Wenger [EP 363]

    Today I’m joined by travel journalist, author, and snowboarder Tim Wenger. After finishing a BA in Communications from Fort Lewis College, Tim jumped into the back of a Ford Econoline and spent a few years playing guitar in dark bars while falling in love with adventure travel. He's been unable to rest his pen (or his feet) ever since.
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    or leave me a message on Speakpipe!
    Show Notes I gotta hear about those years in a Ford Ecoline playing guitar in the dark bars while falling in love with adventure travel. Where, first of all, where'd that idea come from?
    So basically I played guitar in a punk band for about a decade. A couple of them over that time, but primarily one that was more serious and, we toured around the Southwest, playing bars and now and then when we’d open for a bigger band and we'd get to play in a theater. But usually, it was bar-level gigs and sleeping on people's couches and, trying to imitate our heroes. We never quite became the next Blink 182, but, we certainly tried. I always tell people, playing in a rock band is a great thing to do when you're in your twenties, right? Because you're staying out till 2:00 AM all the time, which you'd probably be doing anyway. You're hanging out at rock clubs, you're getting in a van, driving around. It's fun, but it's not something I'd wanna do now.
    So is there a particular story or event from that experience that was maybe uniquely fun or maybe not fun?
    I would say that my favorite thing about it, traveling as a musician, was the camaraderie among the other bands. You know, when you are a working band showing up at a rock club in some random place, you have an instant connection with the other people that are there with the other bands that are going through the same things that you're doing. You know, everybody's got a crappy day job back home and, you're trying to be like your heroes.
    How did you become a writer?
    I went to school for communications. Journalism was kinda my thing. I was on the high school newspaper staff, yada, yada, yada.
    And after the band, you know, I started getting a little older, mid-twenties, starting to get into my upper twenties. I didn't know what I was gonna do. Obviously, this isn't paying the bills, so I started looking for writing gigs and ended up getting a weekly gig for a website that paid $50 a week to do a column about the local music scene in Denver. So that was, that was my first actual paid byline that I ever had, was writing for these guys. And that sort of gave me some clips that I could send out to other publications. It allowed me to be out on the town saying, Hey, I'm writing a story about this. Do you wanna talk to me? And then that leads to more connections. So it's a very self-starting thing, very much like being in a band. So I was kind of able to borrow some of those skills and move them over to keep networking my way into better and better writing gigs.
    Your Matador bio says that you're the transactional content at Matador. What is the transactional content editor?
    Basically, it's a fancy name for affiliate marketing. So I run all of our affiliate marketing content, be that Airbnb roundups or product reviews, or hotel features. I oversee that stuff and I also do a lot of outdoors content. I'm more of the outdoors content, whereas I'm editing the affiliate stuff most of the time.
    You write for a number of other folks also other than Matador, right?
    Right now I have three active contracts of which Matador is the largest. I also write edited a company called Static Media also, and I'm currently working on the Fodors travel guidebook for Colorado that will publish, I believe, next July. So I'm doing four. I'm updating and fact-checking four chapters of

    • 34 min
    Replay- Rob Holmes and GLP Films- empowering tourism brands towards positivity and sustainability through award winning storytelling [EP 362]

    Replay- Rob Holmes and GLP Films- empowering tourism brands towards positivity and sustainability through award winning storytelling [EP 362]

    I’m thrilled to catch up with Rob Holmes today. Rob is the founder of GLP Films, and their mission is to help brands reach sustainability goals, protect nature, communities, culture, and heritage through the lens of storytelling and content marketing.
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    Show Notes How Rob was introduced to the Outdoors My real connection with the outdoors started with my dad and going out on these crazy adventures with him and my two older brothers. The funny thing is my dad was a Southern boy. He's from Tennessee. He knew absolutely nothing about the outdoors. I mean, I, I don't know if he knew anything but someone helped him get the equipment and things that we needed, external backpacks and all that stuff from back then. Honestly, that really, if I had to celebrate my real connection to it. He had two weeks of vacation every year and those would be dedicated to taking his three crazy sons out.
    When he picked up his first camera I had a Pentax K 2000, so if that doesn't date me, I don't know what does. But my getting into photography, was really just my passion thing. It hit me really, I think in college, when, you're exposed to a lot of courses. I went to a small liberal arts college in upstate New York, Hobart College. And I majored in environmental studies, and wildlife management. So sort of this odd combination I had to petition the school cause they had nothing around wildlife. I took one photography class and you take that black-and-white photography class everybody takes to get your entry-level photo class. I got, I think a B, but I remember that I didn't like any of the history stuff. I just wanted to shoot the camera. That's all I wanted to do.
    The start of GLP Film I pretty much was doing freelance. I did some independent projects with organizations, some nonprofits out of Seattle, and one in particular called the Tibetan Nuns Project. It was a small NGO. They had a project on the Tibetan side of India. So I went there for three consecutive years just to shoot their calendar. They had an annual calendar, but that was one example of a project. But more importantly, I did a lot of solo work. When I was in Seattle, I went to grad school. At the University of Washington, I actually got into the business. So I got an MBA, which again, that was the last thing I thought I'd ever get, but I got an MBA and, after school, I started with a company, in the digital content space, in the outdoor industry.
    The inspiration for GLP Films I had these three different sorts of stools and the legs of the stool that I like to look at.
    One was this real passion for conservation. I had a real passion for the outdoors. I worked for the Appalachian Mountain Club for five years. Worked for nonprofits like The Nature Conservancy. So I had a real interest in and passion and conservation. That was one stool. I think the other was obviously media, I started in photography and got into video. I think on the video side, the turning point for me was Al Gore's Inconvenient Truth. Seeing that in 2006, I think it was the number-one at that time documentary film of all time. And if you can take a slideshow and make it the highest-grossing documentary film, there's something there. And, it really was just the power of video.
    And, it really was just the power of video. And I saw that and I used it to go to the Seattle International Film Festival every year. And I would go to all the documentary films on international. I would just go myself, sit in the back row, buy all these random tickets, looking for the most far-flung countries in the world. So I got really into documentaries. So that was the second leg.
    And then the third leg was business. That en

    • 54 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
113 Ratings

113 Ratings

Alan B. Hart ,

Too much inspiring

How the guests tell their stories, is really a great inspiration for me. Each of your episodes motivates me and makes me work hard. Advice are super great. Thanks.

Jeffrey Coleman09 ,

Must try to listen to!

Great host with a great podcast - so easy to listen to - keep up the good work.

The---chosen---1 ,

Always insightful.

Full of great information and easy to listen to.

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