324 episodes

An 'informal and informative' philosophy podcast inspiring and supporting students, teachers, academics and free-thinkers worldwide. All episodes are available at www.thepanpsycast.com.

The Panpsycast Philosophy Podcast Jack Symes | Andrew Horton, Oliver Marley, and Rose de Castellane

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8 • 275 Ratings

An 'informal and informative' philosophy podcast inspiring and supporting students, teachers, academics and free-thinkers worldwide. All episodes are available at www.thepanpsycast.com.

    Episode 130, ‘The Dialectics of Nothingness’ with Gregory S. Moss and Takeshi Morisato (Part II - Further Analysis and Discussion)

    Episode 130, ‘The Dialectics of Nothingness’ with Gregory S. Moss and Takeshi Morisato (Part II - Further Analysis and Discussion)

    In the early part of the twentieth century, three thinkers – Nishida Kitarō, Tanabe Hajime, and Nishitani Keiji – founded the Kyoto School of Philosophy, a group of scholars working at the intersection of Japanese and European thought. The Kyoto School, deeply influenced by the German tradition, wrote extensively on the works of Kant, Hegel, and Heidegger exploring themes such as the limits of our reason and the nature of nothingness. Tanabe, himself a student of Heidegger, explored such topics at length, building on the rich body of thought and – as we shall see – igniting his own philosophy.
    In this episode, we’ll be investigating the profound insights of Tanabe’s philosophy with two of the world’s leading Tanabe scholars: Associate Professor of Philosophy at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Gregory S. Moss and Lecturer in Non-Western Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh, Takeshi Morisato.
    As we explore Tanabe’s work, we’ll see Japan’s, Kyoto School’s, and Tanabe’s histories, unique philosophical paths, and the many questions they illuminate along the way. As we do so, we’ll uncover the invaluable insights of their work and the legacy they left behind.
    Contents
    Part I. The Kyoto School
    Part II. Further Analysis and Discussion





    Links
    Gregory S. Moss (website)
    Takeshi Morisato (website)
    The Dialectics of Absolute Nothingness: The Legacies of German Philosophy in the Kyoto School (book)

    • 47 min
    Episode 130, ‘The Dialectics of Nothingness’ with Gregory S. Moss and Takeshi Morisato (Part I - The Kyoto School)

    Episode 130, ‘The Dialectics of Nothingness’ with Gregory S. Moss and Takeshi Morisato (Part I - The Kyoto School)

    In the early part of the twentieth century, three thinkers – Nishida Kitarō, Tanabe Hajime, and Nishitani Keiji – founded the Kyoto School of Philosophy, a group of scholars working at the intersection of Japanese and European thought. The Kyoto School, deeply influenced by the German tradition, wrote extensively on the works of Kant, Hegel, and Heidegger exploring themes such as the limits of our reason and the nature of nothingness. Tanabe, himself a student of Heidegger, explored such topics at length, building on the rich body of thought and – as we shall see – igniting his own philosophy.
    In this episode, we’ll be investigating the profound insights of Tanabe’s philosophy with two of the world’s leading Tanabe scholars: Associate Professor of Philosophy at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Gregory S. Moss and Lecturer in Non-Western Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh, Takeshi Morisato.
    As we explore Tanabe’s work, we’ll see Japan’s, Kyoto School’s, and Tanabe’s histories, unique philosophical paths, and the many questions they illuminate along the way. As we do so, we’ll uncover the invaluable insights of their work and the legacy they left behind.


    Contents
    Part I. The Kyoto School
    Part II. Further Analysis and Discussion





    Links
    Gregory S. Moss (website)
    Takeshi Morisato (website)
    The Dialectics of Absolute Nothingness: The Legacies of German Philosophy in the Kyoto School (book)

    • 40 min
    Episode 129, Talking about Existence (Part II - Further Analysis and Discussion)

    Episode 129, Talking about Existence (Part II - Further Analysis and Discussion)

    ‘The clouds are grey, the sun obscured and you are walking through the countryside in the overcast of winter. Passing from field to woodland, the trees shed coats of frosty bark to celebrate the passing of another icy season. It feels too early for spring, but echoes of swallows in the canopies sing songs of new beginnings. You pause to catch a glimpse of your woodland companions. With effortless precision, your eyes track the birds as they zip between empty branches and, combining countless neurons, you forecast the birds’ trajectory each time they fall out of view.
    You walk on, emerging from the trees, and return to the open fields. You look back, appreciate the woods and see a river flowing into the trees from the east. Where does the river begin? Escaping the clouds, the sun will soon be free of the sky altogether; if you want to discover the river’s source, you had better get walking.’
    Contents
    Part I. Out of Nothing
    Part II. Further Analysis and Discussion




    Links

    Philosophers on God: Talking about Existence (book)

    • 1 hr 11 min
    Episode 129, Talking about Existence (Part I - Out of Nothing)

    Episode 129, Talking about Existence (Part I - Out of Nothing)

    ‘The clouds are grey, the sun obscured and you are walking through the countryside in the overcast of winter. Passing from field to woodland, the trees shed coats of frosty bark to celebrate the passing of another icy season. It feels too early for spring, but echoes of swallows in the canopies sing songs of new beginnings. You pause to catch a glimpse of your woodland companions. With effortless precision, your eyes track the birds as they zip between empty branches and, combining countless neurons, you forecast the birds’ trajectory each time they fall out of view.
    You walk on, emerging from the trees, and return to the open fields. You look back, appreciate the woods and see a river flowing into the trees from the east. Where does the river begin? Escaping the clouds, the sun will soon be free of the sky altogether; if you want to discover the river’s source, you had better get walking.’
    Contents
    Part I. Out of Nothing
    Part II. Further Analysis and Discussion



    Links

    Philosophers on God: Talking about Existence (book)

    • 1 hr 3 min
    Episode 128, ‘Domestic Labour’ with Paulina Sliwa & Tom McClelland (Part II - Further Analysis and Discussion)

    Episode 128, ‘Domestic Labour’ with Paulina Sliwa & Tom McClelland (Part II - Further Analysis and Discussion)

    ‘The kitchen needs cleaning, but only one of us seems to notice. I mean, he looked straight at the dishes in the sink…and just stacked his dish on top of them. How high does this precarious tower of crockery have to be until he decides to wash the dishes or, more likely, they collapse into an unrepairable heap? I suppose I’ll have to wash them. They won’t get washed otherwise, and I’d rather get them off my mind.’
    The unequal distribution of household labour is a familiar concern amongst feminists. Despite the progress in women’s rights and freedoms, women across the world continue to bear the responsibility of domestic chores and childcare. This raises an important question: why do women in monogamous, opposite-sex relationships continue to shoulder a disproportionate amount of housework work despite their political gains?
    In this episode, we’ll be exploring this question with two outstanding philosophers of morality and mind: Paulina Sliwa (Professor of Philosophy at the University of Vienna) and Thomas McClelland (Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Cambridge). 
    According to Paulina and Tom, our disparities and perception of domestic labour are determined by our feelings, beliefs, and social norms. In other words, the way we perceive the world is radically different. The dishes don’t call out to some – in need of cleaning – in a moment of perception, as they do to others. So what can we do to change this disparity…that is, if it’s in need of changing at all.





    Contents
    Part I. Affordance Perception
    Part II. Further Analysis and Discussion





    Links
    Thomas McClelland and Paulina Sliwa, Gendered Affordance Perception and Unequal Domestic Labour (paper)
    Coverage of Gendered Addordance Perception in the media (website)
    Thomas McClelland (website)
    Paulina Sliwa (website)

    • 32 min
    Episode 128, ‘Domestic Labour’ with Paulina Sliwa & Tom McClelland (Part I - Affordance Perception)

    Episode 128, ‘Domestic Labour’ with Paulina Sliwa & Tom McClelland (Part I - Affordance Perception)

    ‘The kitchen needs cleaning, but only one of us seems to notice. I mean, he looked straight at the dishes in the sink…and just stacked his dish on top of them. How high does this precarious tower of crockery have to be until he decides to wash the dishes or, more likely, they collapse into an unrepairable heap? I suppose I’ll have to wash them. They won’t get washed otherwise, and I’d rather get them off my mind.’
    The unequal distribution of household labour is a familiar concern amongst feminists. Despite the progress in women’s rights and freedoms, women across the world continue to bear the responsibility of domestic chores and childcare. This raises an important question: why do women in monogamous, opposite-sex relationships continue to shoulder a disproportionate amount of housework work despite their political gains?
    In this episode, we’ll be exploring this question with two outstanding philosophers of morality and mind: Paulina Sliwa (Professor of Philosophy at the University of Vienna) and Thomas McClelland (Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Cambridge). 
    According to Paulina and Tom, our disparities and perception of domestic labour are determined by our feelings, beliefs, and social norms. In other words, the way we perceive the world is radically different. The dishes don’t call out to some – in need of cleaning – in a moment of perception, as they do to others. So what can we do to change this disparity…that is, if it’s in need of changing at all.


    Contents
    Part I. Affordance Perception
    Part II. Further Analysis and Discussion





    Links
    Thomas McClelland and Paulina Sliwa, Gendered Affordance Perception and Unequal Domestic Labour (paper)
    Coverage of Gendered Addordance Perception in the media (website)
    Thomas McClelland (website)
    Paulina Sliwa (website)

    • 32 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
275 Ratings

275 Ratings

Eamon Parker ,

Layman’s education

As an engineering and design major in college, I did not recieve a comprehensive humanities education. This podcast goes beyond philosophy writings and connects the old and new, the existential with the real.

elise !!! ,

Can’t listen to anything else

A bit addicted to this podcast. I can barely even listen to music anymore, every time I turn it on I go “hmmm maybe I should listen to the panpsycast instead.” The pod goes into lots of detail without being confusing or too academic about things. You don’t really need any background knowledge on philosophy, they give you the basics and build up from there, always ending with a pretty complete overview of the topic. Love the banter too <3

Exelixii ,

Philosophical discussion at its finest

If you like exploring questions that have no answers, this one is a must.

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture

Where Everybody Knows Your Name with Ted Danson and Woody Harrelson (sometimes)
Team Coco & Ted Danson, Woody Harrelson
Shawn Ryan Show
Shawn Ryan | Cumulus Podcast Network
Stuff You Should Know
iHeartPodcasts
The Unplanned Podcast with Matt & Abby
Matt & Abby | QCODE
This American Life
This American Life
Fail Better with David Duchovny
Lemonada Media

You Might Also Like

The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast
Mark Linsenmayer, Wes Alwan, Seth Paskin, Dylan Casey
Philosophy Bites
Edmonds and Warburton
Philosophy For Our Times
IAI
Theory & Philosophy
David Guignion
Philosophize This!
Stephen West
Very Bad Wizards
Tamler Sommers & David Pizarro