10 episodes

Ever since it was founded in 1683, the Ashmolean Museum has been a place where academics and researchers come to study and be inspired by the collections.

Take a closer look at the Ashmolean's hidden treasures from the viewpoint of the experts. Academics from across the University of Oxford have chosen an object that relates to their research, revealing a whole world of ideas behind a single artefact. We hope that these specially curated podcasts, created by some of the University of Oxford's greatest minds, will encourage you to seek out your own hidden treasure in our vast collection.

Visit the Ashmolean collection and look out for the purple podcast leaflet and signage in the gallery to find the associated objects.

We are enormously grateful to Professor Raymond Dwek, CBE, FRS for his generous support of this new podcast project.

Thinking with Things: The Oxford Collection Oxford University

    • Education

Ever since it was founded in 1683, the Ashmolean Museum has been a place where academics and researchers come to study and be inspired by the collections.

Take a closer look at the Ashmolean's hidden treasures from the viewpoint of the experts. Academics from across the University of Oxford have chosen an object that relates to their research, revealing a whole world of ideas behind a single artefact. We hope that these specially curated podcasts, created by some of the University of Oxford's greatest minds, will encourage you to seek out your own hidden treasure in our vast collection.

Visit the Ashmolean collection and look out for the purple podcast leaflet and signage in the gallery to find the associated objects.

We are enormously grateful to Professor Raymond Dwek, CBE, FRS for his generous support of this new podcast project.

    • video
    Lion Statue

    Lion Statue

    On whether there were ever lions in Egypt. Today, there are no lions roaming wild in north Africa, but evidence from ancient Egypt suggests that lions once did. Could this Egyptian pottery lion, dated to 2,325 – 2,175 BC provide clues to what the north African lion might have looked like? Professor David Whyte Macdonald, Wildlife Conservation, University of Oxford. Object number: AN1896–1908E.189

    • 3 min
    • video
    Henry VIII Renaissance Medal

    Henry VIII Renaissance Medal

    On Henry VIII and the Founding of the Church of England Minted at London in 1545, this medal shows a bust of Henry VIII, with inscriptions in Hebrew and Greek on the reverse. As a consequence of Henry’s break with Rome in 1533, he claimed to be 'Supreme head of Church of England.' With Rev. Professor Diarmaid MacCulloch, History of the Church, University of Oxford. Object number: HCR6591

    • 3 min
    • video
    Meissen porcelain chocolate cup and tea bowl

    Meissen porcelain chocolate cup and tea bowl

    On arranged marriages among royalty. How does porcelain represent a royal marriage? When Maria Amalia of Saxony married Carlo, King of the Two Sicilies, in 1738, she brought Meissen porcelain with her to Naples. Her grandfather had founded the first European porcelain factory in 1710 and the Saxon court often presented porcelain to ambassadors and others who helped them to broker strategic political marriages. With Professor Helen Watanabe-O'Kelly, German Literature, University of Oxford. Object number: WA1977.246-7.

    • 2 min
    • video
    Arab robe worn by T. E. Lawrence

    Arab robe worn by T. E. Lawrence

    On Lawrence of Arabia and wearing Arab robes. T. E. Lawrence, or Lawrence of Arabia was infamous for his scruffy appearance when in the British Khaki uniform, and wore it as little as possible. However, Lawrence took on quite a different guise when his friend King Faisal of Iraq suggested he dress in his set of Arab wedding clothes. With Professor Eugene Rogan, Modern Middle Eastern History, University of Oxford. Object number: EA1965.176.

    • 3 min
    • video
    Silver-gilt carriage clock

    Silver-gilt carriage clock

    This travelling calendar carriage clock dates to 1747–1823. Why would such a clock need to have both lunar and sun time represented on it? With Professor Chris Lintott Astrophysics, University of Oxford. Object number: WA1949.134

    • 2 min
    • video
    Ennui by Walter Richard Sickert

    Ennui by Walter Richard Sickert

    On Viginia Woolf's interpretation of Walter Sickert's painting of Ennui. Virginia Woolf, the famous author, wrote an essay 'Walter Sickert: a conversation' on the painting of Ennui by Walter Richard Sickert in 1933. Woolf describes how she imagines the characters in the painting as an old publican, 'with his glass on the table before him and a cigar at his lips.' With Professor Dame Hermione Lee, English Literature, University of Oxford.
    Object number: WA1940.1.92

    • 3 min

Top Podcasts In Education

The Mel Robbins Podcast
Mel Robbins
The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast
Dr. Jordan B. Peterson
Academy of Ideas
Academy of Ideas
Mick Unplugged
Mick Hunt
TED Talks Daily
TED
Law of Attraction SECRETS
Natasha Graziano

More by Oxford University

Approaching Shakespeare
Oxford University
Theoretical Physics - From Outer Space to Plasma
Oxford University
The Secrets of Mathematics
Oxford University
Philosophy for Beginners
Oxford University
Computer Science
Oxford University
Anthropology
Oxford University