72 episodes

A podcast about the Fathers of the Church—the foundational figures in Christian history. Hosted by popular Patristics author Mike Aquilina.

Season 1 covers all the Fathers in chronological order. Season 2 covers the Ecumenical Councils. Episodes without season number are miscellaneous topics.

A production of CatholicCulture.org.

Way of the Fathers with Mike Aquilina CatholicCulture.org

    • Religion & Spirituality
    • 4.9 • 130 Ratings

A podcast about the Fathers of the Church—the foundational figures in Christian history. Hosted by popular Patristics author Mike Aquilina.

Season 1 covers all the Fathers in chronological order. Season 2 covers the Ecumenical Councils. Episodes without season number are miscellaneous topics.

A production of CatholicCulture.org.

    2.1 Where Councils Come From: An Introduction

    2.1 Where Councils Come From: An Introduction

    When the Church is in crisis, its bishops meet in council. Since the generation of the Apostles, this has been the customary way of settling major disputes over doctrine and discipline. In the Acts of the Apostles, chapter 15, the Twelve met with certain elders and chosen experts to exercise an authority that was different from the authority that any of them possessed individually. This established a practice for the ages to follow. The councils in the time of the Fathers—the first seven ecumenical councils—are considered authoritative by the Catholic Church and the Orthodox Churches. In this episode, we look at the pre-history of those councils and consider their definitions and authority.
    LINKS
    Cyprian of Carthage, On the Seventh Council of Carthage https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/fathers/view.cfm?recnum=1719
    Canons of the Council of Ancyra (A.D. 314) https://www.newadvent.org/fathers/3802.htm
    Canons of the Council of Necaesarea (A.D. 315) https://www.newadvent.org/fathers/3803.htm
    Mike Aquilina’s website https://fathersofthechurch.com
    Mike Aquilina’s books https://catholicbooksdirect.com/writer/mike-aquilina/
    Theme music: Gaudeamus (Introit for the Feast of All Saints), sung by Jeff Ostrowski. Courtesy of Corpus Christi Watershed http://www.ccwatershed.org
    Donate today! https://www.catholicculture.org/users/donate/audio

    • 19 min
    2.2—The Council of Nicaea: First and Foremost

    2.2—The Council of Nicaea: First and Foremost

    Nicaea (325 A.D.) is the first of the ecumenical councils, not only in chronology, but also in importance. It occupies a certain primacy. The phrase "Nicene Faith" is sometimes used as an equivalent term for classic Christian doctrine. That's how we see it after centuries of development. But what did it mean to those who attended?
    LINKS
    Eusebius of Caesarea, Oration in Praise of the Emperor Constantine https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/fathers/view.cfm?recnum=2883
    Eusebius of Caesarea, The Life of the Blessed Emperor Constantine https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/fathers/view.cfm?recnum=2881
    Athanasius, De Synodis https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/fathers/view.cfm?recnum=3086
    John Henry Newman, Arians of the Fourth Century https://www.newmanreader.org/works/arians/index.html
    Lewis Ayres, Nicaea and Its Legacy: An Approach to Fourth-Century Trinitarian Theology https://www.amazon.com/Nicaea-Its-Legacy-Fourth-Century-Trinitarian/dp/0198755058/
    Mike Aquilina’s website https://fathersofthechurch.com
    Mike Aquilina’s books https://catholicbooksdirect.com/writer/mike-aquilina/
    Theme music: Gaudeamus (Introit for the Feast of All Saints), sung by Jeff Ostrowski. Courtesy of Corpus Christi Watershed http://www.ccwatershed.org
    Donate today! https://www.catholicculture.org/users/donate/audio

    • 23 min
    2.3 First Constantinople: A Capital Council

    2.3 First Constantinople: A Capital Council

    Nicaea didn't resolve the Arian crisis. In fact, it provoked a riot of reactions — endless variations on the Arian theme. Imperial force only made matters worse. For a half-century, conflict raged. The situation seemed hopeless until Theodosius summoned bishops to meet in 381.
    LINKS
    Socrates Scholasticus, Church History (Book V) https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/fathers/view.cfm?recnum=2884
    Sozomen, Ecclesiastical History (Book VII) https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/fathers/view.cfm?recnum=2885
    Theodoret, Ecclesiastical History (Book V) https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/fathers/view.cfm?recnum=2886
    Gregory Nazianzen, “Oration XLII: The Last Farewell in the Presence of the One Hundred and Fifty Bishops” https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/fathers/view.cfm?recnum=2452
    John Henry Newman, Arians of the Fourth Century https://www.newmanreader.org/works/arians/index.html
    Lewis Ayres, Nicaea and Its Legacy: An Approach to Fourth-Century Trinitarian Theology https://www.amazon.com/Nicaea-Its-Legacy-Fourth-Century-Trinitarian/dp/0198755058/
    Mike Aquilina’s website https://fathersofthechurch.com
    Mike Aquilina’s books https://catholicbooksdirect.com/writer/mike-aquilina/
    Theme music: Gaudeamus (Introit for the Feast of All Saints), sung by Jeff Ostrowski. Courtesy of Corpus Christi Watershed http://www.ccwatershed.org
    Donate today! https://www.catholicculture.org/users/donate/audio
     

    • 21 min
    2.4 Ephesus: The Mother of All Controversies

    2.4 Ephesus: The Mother of All Controversies

    From the distance of more than a millennium and a half, Nestorius can seem a comic character. He was a verbally fussy man with an uncanny knack for alienating people. Within days of his installation as bishop of Constantinople, he had offended the imperial family, the monks, and the nobles, but also the common people. He also caused a major fire in the city. But when he tried to suppress devotion to Mary as “Mother of God,” he invited all his enemies to join forces against him—because such a campaign affected not only the status of Mary, but also the doctrine of Jesus Christ. Nestorius forced a crisis that played out in grotesque (and humorous) ways at the Council of Ephesus in 431.
    LINKS
    Cyril of Alexandria, Five Tomes against Nestorius https://www.tertullian.org/fathers/cyril_against_nestorius_00_intro.htm
    Extracts from the Acts, Council of Ephesus https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/view.cfm?recnum=5347
    Nestorius, The Bazaar of Heracleides https://www.tertullian.org/fathers/nestorius_bazaar_0_eintro.htm
    Nestorius, Letters to Pope Celestine https://www.tertullian.org/fathers/nestorius_two_letters_01.htm
    Socrates Scholasticus, Church History, Book VII https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/fathers/view.cfm?recnum=2884
    John A. McGuckin, Saint Cyril of Alexandria and the Christological Controversy https://www.amazon.com/Saint-Cyril-Alexandria-Christological-Controversy/dp/0881418633/
    Mike Aquilina’s website https://fathersofthechurch.com
    Mike Aquilina’s books https://catholicbooksdirect.com/writer/mike-aquilina/
    Theme music: Gaudeamus (Introit for the Feast of All Saints), sung by Jeff Ostrowski. Courtesy of Corpus Christi Watershed http://www.ccwatershed.org
    Donate today! https://www.catholicculture.org/users/donate/audio

    • 36 min
    2.5 Chalcedon — Firm Foundation for the Doctrine of Christ

    2.5 Chalcedon — Firm Foundation for the Doctrine of Christ

    What happened when God took flesh? A simple question roused hundreds of speculative answers, most concerning the “person” and “nature” (or natures) of Jesus Christ. But the philosophical terms themselves were slippery, and mistranslations only made matters worse. The wild speculation came to a stop at the Council of Chalcedon, thanks to a letter from Pope Leo the Great. His “Tome” defined terms with abundant clarity. Since then, in mainstream Christianity, Orthodox Christology has been Chalcedonian Christology. The Tome is a necessary point of reference for all subsequent doctrine of Jesus Christ.
    LINKS
    Leo the Great, Letter 28 https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/fathers/view.cfm?recnum=2156
    Leo the Great, Letter 93 (to the Council of Chalcedon) https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/fathers/view.cfm?recnum=2157
    Letter 98 (From the Council of Chalcedon to Pope Leo) https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/fathers/view.cfm?recnum=2159
    Leo the Great, Letter 162 (“The decrees of Chalcedon and Nicæa are identical and final”) https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/fathers/view.cfm?recnum=2145
    Leo the Great, The Tome (text) https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/view.cfm?recnum=5344
    Leo the Great, The Tome (audiobook) https://www.catholicculture.org/commentary/st-leo-great-tome-leo/
    Acts of the Council of Chalcedon https://www.newadvent.org/fathers/3811.htm
    Mike Aquilina’s website https://fathersofthechurch.com
    Mike Aquilina’s books https://catholicbooksdirect.com/writer/mike-aquilina/
    Theme music: Gaudeamus (Introit for the Feast of All Saints), sung by Jeff Ostrowski. Courtesy of Corpus Christi Watershed http://www.ccwatershed.org
    Donate today! https://www.catholicculture.org/users/donate/audio

    • 16 min
    Ep. 1 - First Steps on the Way of the Fathers

    Ep. 1 - First Steps on the Way of the Fathers

    With this episode author Mike Aquilina begins his twice-monthly series on the lives, times, and works of the early Church Fathers. The Way of the Fathers begins with answers to basic questions. What is fatherhood? And who are the Fathers?
    The answers come from sources ancient (Vincent of Lerins) and modern (Ratzinger) — theologians who draw from the still more ancient words and patterns of biblical religion.
    Mapping the Way of the Fathers, Aquilina touches upon the achievements of the early Christians, especially their establishment of the canons of Scripture, liturgy, and Church order.
    The Fathers made us who we are. This podcast begins our pilgrimage to give them the honor that’s their due.
    Links
    Buy Mike Aquilina’s book The Fathers of the Church https://www.amazon.com/Fathers-Church-Mike-Aquilina/dp/1612785611 
    Buy Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger’s Principles of Catholic Theology: Building Stones for a Fundamental Theology https://www.amazon.com/Principles-Catholic-Theology-Building-Fundamental/dp/0898702151 
    Follow Mike Aquilina on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AuthorMikeAquilina
    Works of the Fathers online https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/fathers/
    More Works by the Fathers http://www.tertullian.org/fathers/
    Contemporary Application of an Idea from the Fathers: The Catena https://www.beholdthetruth.com
    Mike Aquilina’s Website https://fathersofthechurch.com
    Mike Aquilina at Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Aquilina
    USCCB: “Praying with the Fathers of the Church: A Reflection per Day for Advent-Christmas and Lent-Easter,” by Mike Aquilina http://www.usccb.org/beliefs-and-teachings/how-we-teach/catechesis/catechetical-sunday/prayer/family-resources-mike-aquilina.cfm
    Theme music: Gaudeamus (Introit for the Feast of All Saints), sung by Jeff Ostrowski. Courtesy of http://www.ccwatershed.org.

    • 14 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
130 Ratings

130 Ratings

Aleshnor ,

Dive right in!

This was just what I was looking for to learn about the fathers in chronological order. Mike Aquilina has been studying and writing about church history for over 20 years and is a great educator. Thank you!

chuckriver85 ,

Very good, but needs to be more doctrine centered

Overall I recommend this podcast since there is good information. The podcast seems to me a little light on doctrine and a little heavy on anecdotes. Also, it’s very hard to listen to the narrator’s “overly nice” voice inflection. It sounds very unnatural and is distracting.

chulo0o12 ,

This is a pod cast

Don’t read to me from a script

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