33 episodes

This podcast is an effort to promote visibility of women in mathematics. Inspired by the fact that women are vast minority in higher mathematics, Women in Math: The Limit Does Not Exist serves to increase enrollment and participation of women in mathematics and STEM courses.

Women in Math: The Limit Does Not Exist Women in Math: The Limit Does Not Exist

    • Education

This podcast is an effort to promote visibility of women in mathematics. Inspired by the fact that women are vast minority in higher mathematics, Women in Math: The Limit Does Not Exist serves to increase enrollment and participation of women in mathematics and STEM courses.

    Episode 33 - An Interview with Dr. Nichole Schimanski

    Episode 33 - An Interview with Dr. Nichole Schimanski

    Naomi Grant interviews Dr. Nichole Schimanski, a data scientist for Portland Research and Development company Galois. In this interview, Dr. Schimanski discusses why she decided to major in mathematics, what it was like to fall in love with math, what working in the Data Science industry has been like, living out your dream, working for a company that values you (and working for a company that does not value you), and so much more! This episode was edited by Naomi Grant. This podcast is part of Damien Adams' series Women in Math: The Limit Does Not Exist.

    • 44 min
    Episode 32 - A Conversation Between Shannon, Kyli, & Kelli

    Episode 32 - A Conversation Between Shannon, Kyli, & Kelli

    Shannon Rodriguez, Kyli Layden, & Kelli Thoreson chat about their experiences as math students, exploring Mathematics, Engineering, and Computer Science as majors, their favorite math classes and why they liked them, the importance of language in mathematics, and just having fun! This podcast is part of Damien Adams' series Women in Math: The Limit Does Not Exist.

    • 1 hr 25 min
    Episode 31 - Mary Cartwright

    Episode 31 - Mary Cartwright

    Sophie Bandstra gives a biography on Mary Cartwright, the 20th century British mathematician known for her contributions to education and chaos theory. This podcast is part of Damien Adams' series Women in Math: The Limit Does Not Exist.

    • 8 min
    Episode 30 - Nola's Story - A Story of Inspiration

    Episode 30 - Nola's Story - A Story of Inspiration

    In this episode, Nola Leese-Heckman describes her mathematical past. After several struggles and deciding to give up on mathematics several times, she now finds herself triumphing in the subject! This podcast is part of Damien Adams' series Women in Math: The Limit Does Not Exist.

    • 9 min
    Episode 29 - Maryam Mirzakhani

    Episode 29 - Maryam Mirzakhani

    Laura Messick gives a biography on Maryam Mirzakhani, the 21st century Iranian mathematician known for being the first female and first Iranian to be awarded a Fields Medal. Maryam is known for her contributions to string theory, Riemann surfaces, geodesics, her compassion, and her instruction at Stanford University. Dr. Mirzakhani passed away from cancer in 2017 and is survived by her daughter and husband. This podcast is part of Damien Adams' series Women in Math: The Limit Does Not Exist.

    • 5 min
    Episode 28 - An Interview with Dr. Becky Morgan

    Episode 28 - An Interview with Dr. Becky Morgan

    Tori Roberts interviews Dr. Becky Morgan, a Cabrillo Psychology instructor with a Bachelor's Degree in Mathematics. In this interview, Dr. Morgan discusses why she decided to major in mathematics, why she decided to get a graduate degree in a different field, the decision-making process of deciding a major, having support as a student, the beauty of mathematics, the impact of an instructor on a student's perception, and even having a relative in the mathematics field! This podcast is part of Damien Adams' series Women in Math: The Limit Does Not Exist.

    • 47 min

Customer Reviews

KesaGatame ,

Speakers have no idea what they’re talking about...?

Ep23 discussing polytopes — the speaker notes that they don’t really know anything about them and can barely even pronounce the word...

I would expect a discussion of mathematical contributions be made bu someone that actually learned and understood the math that was contributed... or at least rehearsed enough to be able to pronounce terms.

If trying to engage people with math showing an actual engagement on the part of the speaker would help. This feels like a high school history assignment that involves reading unfamiliar wikipedia pages... :/

Maybe it gets better?

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