100 episodes

The world as we knew it is undergoing a rapid transformation…so what's next?

Welcome to WorldAffairs, your guide to a changing world. We give you the context you need to navigate across borders and ideologies. Through sound-rich stories and in-depth interviews, we break down what it means to be a global citizen on a hot, crowded planet.

Our hosts, Ray Suarez and Philip Yun, help you make sense of an uncertain world, one story at a time.

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    • News
    • 4.3 • 174 Ratings

The world as we knew it is undergoing a rapid transformation…so what's next?

Welcome to WorldAffairs, your guide to a changing world. We give you the context you need to navigate across borders and ideologies. Through sound-rich stories and in-depth interviews, we break down what it means to be a global citizen on a hot, crowded planet.

Our hosts, Ray Suarez and Philip Yun, help you make sense of an uncertain world, one story at a time.

    A Blurred Civilian/Soldier Line? Accountability in the Age of Drones

    A Blurred Civilian/Soldier Line? Accountability in the Age of Drones

    The so-called “War on Terror” has defined US foreign policy for the past twenty years. The dense web of overseas conflicts and the growing use of remote weaponry, like drones, has left many average Americans feeling disengaged from the human toll of war. 
     
    Journalist Azmat Khan says our ignorance  isn’t an accident. She was recently awarded a Pulitzer Prize for her work uncovering the US military’s systematic failure to investigate civilian casualties in the ongoing US fight against ISIS. Khan sits down with Ray Suarez to discuss what accountability looks like in the age of remote warfare, and the importance of civilian oversight in US military action.
     
    Guest:
     
    Azmat Khan, investigative reporter for the New York Times Magazine
     
    Host:
     
    Ray Suarez
     
    If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

    • 33 min
    Forging Identity After War: Activism and Storytelling

    Forging Identity After War: Activism and Storytelling

    Aminatta Forna was a child when Sierra Leone fell into a brutal, ten-year civil war. Now, 20 years later, she’s working to ensure that Sierra Leoneans shape the country’s postwar narrative.
     
    Forna joins Ray to chat about legacy, trauma, and forging identity – and joy – in the aftermath of violence, in her recent essay collection, The Window Seat: Notes from a Life in Motion.
     
    Guest:
     
    Aminatta Forna, award-winning writer and author of The Window Seat: Notes from a Life in Motion
     
    Host:
     
    Ray Suarez
     
    If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

    • 28 min
    Are Women the Future of Sierra Leone?

    Are Women the Future of Sierra Leone?

    War captures headlines… but what happens when the rubble clears? How does a country – and its people – rebuild after tragedy?
     
    Chernor Bah was a child when Sierra Leone fell into a brutal, ten-year civil war. Now, 20 years later, he’s working to ensure that Sierra Leoneans, especially women, are at the center of the country’s postwar narrative and development.
     
    Bah shares how his early experiences with war and humanitarian aid inspired to create Purposeful, an Africa-rooted organization that challenges the long held assumption that men – and white donors – should dictate redevelopment in the Global South.
     
    Guest:
     
    Chernor Bah, co-founder and CEO of Purposeful
     
    Host: 
     
    Ray Suarez
     
    If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

    • 31 min
    Dr. Atul Gawande’s Prescription for COVID and Aging: What Can We Learn?

    Dr. Atul Gawande’s Prescription for COVID and Aging: What Can We Learn?

    Dr. Atul Gawande has had a varied, celebrated career in medicine. He’s been a physician, a writer, and now he’s the Global Health Assistant Administrator at USAID. Dr. Gawande has always said the task of sharing medical progress with every corner of the planet is “the most ambitious thing we’ve ever attempted.” From facing a global public health system weakened by COVID-19, to families seeking support caring for aging loved ones, Dr. Gawande is focused on “generational work” at USAID, and about how society can step up. 
     
    In this episode, Dr. Gawande and Ray Suarez discuss taking public health work to the global stage, and the immense challenges that lie ahead.
     
    Support for this podcast episode was provided in part by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of the Foundation.
     
    Guest(s):
     
    Dr. Atul Gawande, writer, physician, and Assistant Administrator for Global Health for the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) 
     
    Host:  
     
    Ray Suarez
     
    If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

    • 30 min
    The New Story of Old Age: What Japan and the Pandemic Can Teach Us About Living Longer

    The New Story of Old Age: What Japan and the Pandemic Can Teach Us About Living Longer

    By 2030, it’s estimated one out of every six people on Planet Earth will be over 60. In Japan, nearly 30% of the population is already over 65. But Poland, Romania, Cuba, Serbia, and South Korea? They’re some of the fastest-aging societies on the planet, as well.
     
    Ray Suarez chats with Joseph F. Coughlin, founder and director of the MIT AgeLab, about how leaps in technology have led to longer life spans — and why it may be the key to making the most out of borrowed time. Then, Motoko Rich, Tokyo bureau chief for The New York Times, shares how this demographic force is already being felt in Japan, the poster “grandparent” for aging societies worldwide.
     
    Support for this podcast episode was provided in part by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The views expressed here do not necessarily reflect the views of the Foundation.
     
    Guests:
     
    Joseph F. Coughlin, PhD, Founder and Director of MIT’s AgeLab
     
    Motoko Rich, Tokyo Bureau Chief for the New York Times
     
    Host:  
     
    Ray Suarez
     

    If you appreciate this episode and want to support the work we do, please consider making a donation to World Affairs. We cannot do this work without your help. Thank you.

    • 29 min
    Forty Years After Vincent Chin, Asian Americans Continue to Fight Hate

    Forty Years After Vincent Chin, Asian Americans Continue to Fight Hate

    Forty years later, the anniversary of Vincent Chin’s death reminds us Anti-Asian hate crimes haven't gone away. Filmmaker Renee Tajima-Peña, who co-directed the documentary, “Who Killed Vincent Chin?” and activist Helen Zia talk with Ray Suarez about the ongoing fight to recognize diverse Asian-American histories, challenging stereotypes and what justice means today. 
     
    For more information, check out Renee Tajima-Pena’s documentary, Who Killed Vincent Chin?, and Tajima-Pena’s docuseries, Asian Americans.
     
    Guests:
     
    Renee Tajima-Peña, Academy Award-nominated filmmaker and Professor of Asian American Studies at UCLA
     
    Helen Zia, activist, executor of the Vincent and Lily Chin estate, and author of books including Last Boat out of Shanghai and My Country vs. Me
     
    Host:
     
    Ray Suarez

    • 22 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
174 Ratings

174 Ratings

womanbyherradio ,

1st rate

World Affairs is one of the finest, most informative, news and issues programs around. Ray Suarez continues his deeply considered and compassionate newscasting in this forum. Unlike current affairs podcasts with a set of bright folks who mainly speak to each other, this program never loses sight of its purpose, to inform listeners.

Sonia PQ ,

Excellent global affairs podcast

In the world of global affairs, geopolitics, and international relations podcasts, this one is hands-down one of the best out there. Weekly episodes cover urgent and important world issues with clarity against the backdrop of well-researched historical context. Ray Suarez's depth of knowledge makes the discussion of complicated topics a fascinating listen. I am also a big fan of Philip Yun and his expertise and insights that come from extensive foreign policy work. I look forward to this podcast every week and highly recommend to to all who are passionate or just plain curious about foreign affairs and the intriguing world in which we live.

SoniaDPQ ,

Excellent global affairs podcast

In the world of global affairs, geopolitics, and international relations podcasts, this one is hands-down one of the best out there. Weekly episodes cover urgent and important world issues with clarity against the backdrop of well-researched historical context. Ray Suarez’s depth of knowledge makes the discussion of complicated topics a fascinating listen. I am also a big fan of Philip Yun and his expertise and insights that come from extensive foreign policy work. I look forward to this podcast every week snd highly recommend it to all who are passionate, intrigued, and just plain curious about foreign affairs and the fascinating world we live in.

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