286 episodes

You Are Not So Smart is a show about psychology that celebrates science and self delusion. In each episode, we explore what we've learned so far about reasoning, biases, judgments, and decision-making.

You Are Not So Smart You Are Not So Smart

    • Science
    • 4.5 • 1.7K Ratings

You Are Not So Smart is a show about psychology that celebrates science and self delusion. In each episode, we explore what we've learned so far about reasoning, biases, judgments, and decision-making.

    289 - Hack Your Bureaucracy - Marina Nitze (rebroadcast)

    289 - Hack Your Bureaucracy - Marina Nitze (rebroadcast)

    Marina Nitze is a professional fixer of broken systems – a hacker, not of computers and technology, but of the social phenomena that tend to emerge when people get together and form organizations, institutions, services, businesses, and governments. In short, she hacks bureaucracies and wants to teach you how to do the same.

    • 41 min
    288 - Fluke - Brian Klaas

    288 - Fluke - Brian Klaas

    In this episode we sit down with Brian Klaas, author of Fluke, to get into the existential lessons and grander meaning for a life well-lived once one finally accepts the power and influence of randomness, chaos, and chance.

    • 50 min
    287 - The Complexity of Genius - David Krakauer and Dean Simonton

    287 - The Complexity of Genius - David Krakauer and Dean Simonton

    In this episode, we are exploring the complexity of the concept of "genius" with two experts on the topic. First you’ll hear from David Krakauer, the president of The Santa Fe Institute, a research institution in New Mexico dedicated to the study of complexity science, and then you'll hear from professor Dean Keith Simonton, one of the world’s leading researchers into the psychological mechanisms and influences that generate the phenomenon we so often refer to as "genius."

    • 1 hr 4 min
    286 - Notes on Complexity - Neil Theise

    286 - Notes on Complexity - Neil Theise

    In this episode we sit down with professor Neil Theise, the author of Notes on Complexity, to get an introduction to complexity theory, the science of how complex systems behave – from cells to human beings, ecosystems, the known universe, and beyond – and we explore if Ian Malcolm was right when he told us in Jurassic Park that "Life, um, finds a way."

    • 57 min
    285 - What Do You Mean? - Celeste Kidd (rebroadcast)

    285 - What Do You Mean? - Celeste Kidd (rebroadcast)

    Is a hotdog a sandwich? Well, that depends on your definition of a sandwich (and a hotdog), and according to the most recent research in cognitive science, the odds that your concept of a sandwich is the same as another person's concept are shockingly low. In this episode we explore how understanding why that question became a world-spanning argument in the mid 2010s helps us understand some of the world-spanning arguments vexing us today.

    • 48 min
    284 - Awe - Dacher Keltner (rebroadcast)

    284 - Awe - Dacher Keltner (rebroadcast)

    In this episode we sit down with psychologist Dacher Keltner, one of the world’s leading experts on the science of emotion, the man Pixar hired to help them write Inside Out. In his new book – Awe: The New Science of Everyday Wonder and How It Can Transform Your Life – he outlines his years of work in this field, the health benefits of awe, the evolutionary origins and likely functions, and how to better pursue more awe and wonder in your own life.

    • 54 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
1.7K Ratings

1.7K Ratings

MWOTR ,

Eye-opening

David McRaney’s podcast has led me to read many books (including his) and introduced me to one of my passions (trying to learn how to listen to and learn from those who disagree with me—Braver Angels). I used to mainly read historical fiction—now I just can’t get enough social psychology and behavior science. And he does it all with humility and humor.

kcdrummer ,

Could be better

I’ve enjoyed this podcast on and off for a few years. Unfortunately, I can’t take it for more than a few episodes at a time because David, much like many amateur Hosts, he fills about 50% of the interview with his thoughts instead of letting the expert speak. It’s normal to want to engage, share your thoughts, and your “oh yeah, that reminds me of this” moments when you’re having a conversation. But this is a conversation for others to listen to, and we want to hear the expert.

I often look at who is being interviewed and find them on another podcast where the host knows how to ask good questions and get out of the way.

Sonneveldt ,

Thoughtful

This podcast presents in a way that causes me to stop, think… sometimes reframe. I always appreciate it.

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