871 episodes

Our near daily podcasts move quickly to reflect current events, are inspired by real patient care, and speak to the true nature of what it’s like to work in the Emergency Room or Pre-Hospital Setting. Each medical minute is recorded in a real emergency department, by the emergency physician or clinical pharmacist on duty – the ER is our studio and everything is live.

Emergency Medical Minute Emergency Medical Minute

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.1 • 7 Ratings

Our near daily podcasts move quickly to reflect current events, are inspired by real patient care, and speak to the true nature of what it’s like to work in the Emergency Room or Pre-Hospital Setting. Each medical minute is recorded in a real emergency department, by the emergency physician or clinical pharmacist on duty – the ER is our studio and everything is live.

    Podcast 746: Elderly Head Trauma on Anticoagulation

    Podcast 746: Elderly Head Trauma on Anticoagulation

    Contributor: Aaron Lessen, MD
    Educational Pearls:
    Biggest study to date examined new protocol for repeat head CT in anticoagulated elderly patients with head trauma and an initial negative head CT 0.5%-6% of patients in this category will get a delayed ICH and this can occur up to a week out from initial injury 18% of the study group had an ICH on initial head CT, but the rest who had negative head CT initially received a repeat head CT at 6 hours 0.9% had a bleed identified on repeat head CT 6 hours after initial imaging, but of this group no one had an intervention for this bleed Suggests repeat head CT may not be needed and that good counseling for return precautions and discharge is a reasonable disposition in caring for these patients Supratherapeutic INR was a risk factor for delayed bleed, so they should be treated as a higher risk group of patients References
    Borst J, Godat LN, Berndtson AE, Kobayashi L, Doucet JJ, Costantini TW. Repeat head computed tomography for anticoagulated patients with an initial negative scan is not cost-effective. Surgery. 2021;170(2):623-627. doi:10.1016/j.surg.2021.02.024
    Summarized by John Spartz, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD
     
    The Emergency Medical Minute is excited to announce that we are now offering AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ via online course modules. To access these and for more information, visit our website at https://emergencymedicalminute.org/cme-courses/ and create an account. 
    Donate to EMM today!

    • 3 min
    Podcast 745: Nitrous-Induced B12 Deficiency

    Podcast 745: Nitrous-Induced B12 Deficiency

    Contributor: Alicia Oberle, MD
    Educational Pearls:
    Nitrous oxide (N2O) can cause a vitamin B12 deficiency in patients after regular use N2O is used in procedural sedation but also as a popular recreational drug  N2O binds and inactivate B12 in the body, therefore decreasing usable supply Lack of B12, which is essential for myelinating nerves, can lead to subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord Presentation may include paresthesias, ataxia, gait changes, or bilateral lower extremity motor weakness B12 can be normal on labs, as the B12 is present but inactivated Treatment is daily B12 injections and oral supplementation References
    Stockton L, Simonsen C, Seago S. Nitrous oxide-induced vitamin B12 deficiency. Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent). 2017;30(2):171-172. doi:10.1080/08998280.2017.11929571
    Samia AM, Nenow J, Price D. Subacute Combined Degeneration Secondary to Nitrous Oxide Abuse: Quantification of Use With Patient Follow-up. Cureus. 2020;12(10):e11041. Published 2020 Oct 19. doi:10.7759/cureus.11041
    Edigin E, Ajiboye O, Nathani A. Nitrous Oxide-induced B12 Deficiency Presenting With Myeloneuropathy. Cureus. 2019;11(8):e5331. Published 2019 Aug 6. doi:10.7759/cureus.5331
    *Image obtained from Wikimedia author Hansmuller and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license.
    Summarized by John Spartz, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD
    The Emergency Medical Minute is excited to announce that we are now offering AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ via online course modules. To access these and for more information, visit our website at https://emergencymedicalminute.org/cme-courses/ and create an account. 
    Donate to EMM today!

    • 2 min
    Podcast 744: Glucagon for Beta Blocker Toxicity

    Podcast 744: Glucagon for Beta Blocker Toxicity

    Educational Pearls:
    Glucagon can be used to treat hypoglycemia and esophageal foreign body, but it can also be used in beta-blocker toxicity to bypass cardiac beta-blockade The superior option for treating bradycardia due to beta-blocker toxicity is glucagon Glucagon has decreased efficacy in patients with heart failure, so increased doses up to 10 mg might be required in the event of beta-blocker toxicity References
    Khalid MM, Galuska MA, Hamilton RJ. Beta-Blocker Toxicity. [Updated 2021 Jul 26]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK448097/
    Rotella JA, Greene SL, Koutsogiannis Z, et al. Treatment for beta-blocker poisoning: a systematic review. Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2020;58(10):943-983. doi:10.1080/15563650.2020.1752918
    Summarized by John Spartz, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD
     
    The Emergency Medical Minute is excited to announce that we are now offering AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ via online course modules. To access these and for more information, visit our website at https://emergencymedicalminute.org/cme-courses/ and create an account. 
    Donate to EMM today!

    • 2 min
    Podcast 743: Rust Rings

    Podcast 743: Rust Rings

    Contributor: Jared Scott, MD
    Educational Pearls:
    A rust ring can occur after a metallic foreign body is left in the eye for a prolonged period of time Issues occur when the rust ring is left as it can epithelialize and become a permanent spot in the patient’s vision An eye burr or Alger brush can help to gouge out the rust ring in the emergency setting These tools have a failsafe mechanism to prevent the eye burr from going through layers past the cornea (though this does not work if the foreign body is already through the cornea) Referral to ophthalmology, antibiotic drops, and dilating drops are recommended options upon discharge Complications include poor wound healing, scarring, and infection References
    Camodeca AJ, Anderson EP. Corneal Foreign Body. [Updated 2021 Apr 26]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2021 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK536977/
    https://www.reviewofoptometry.com/article/no-insult-to-injury-managing-foreign--body-removal
    Summarized by John Spartz, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD
     
    The Emergency Medical Minute is excited to announce that we are now offering AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ via online course modules. To access these and for more information, visit our website at https://emergencymedicalminute.org/cme-courses/ and create an account. 
    Donate to EMM today!

    • 5 min
    Podcast 742: Pulse Check During CPR

    Podcast 742: Pulse Check During CPR

     
    Contributor: Aaron Lessen, MD
    Educational Pearls:
    Pulse checks are necessary during CPR to check for return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) Previous studies have shown that assessing ROSC with palpating for pulse are not a very consistent Study compared palpating pulses at carotid/femoral artery versus a newly contrived gold standard for pulse checks The gold standard used was an increase in end tidal CO2 + cardiac activity on ultrasound + perfusing rhythm on ECG Carotid artery palpation was the best location to confirm pulse during pulse check, although femoral artery palpation Carotid artery palpation was 92% accurate versus 82% accuracy with femoral pulse check Regardless of chosen site, remember 10 seconds is the maximum amount of time for a pulse check before resuming CPR References
    Yılmaz G, Bol O. Comparison of femoral and carotid arteries in terms of pulse check in cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A prospective observational study. Resuscitation. 2021;162:56-62. doi:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.01.042
    Summarized by John Spartz, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD
     
    The Emergency Medical Minute is excited to announce that we are now offering AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ via online course modules. To access these and for more information, visit our website at https://emergencymedicalminute.org/cme-courses/ and create an account. 
    Donate to EMM today!

    • 3 min
    Podcast 741: Calcium for Cardiac Arrest

    Podcast 741: Calcium for Cardiac Arrest

    Contributor: Aaron Lessen, MD
    Educational Pearls:
    Study of nearly 400 patients evaluating giving calcium during cardiac arrest with the endpoint as return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) Compared giving 1 amp calcium chloride with each round of epinephrine for the first two rounds of epinephrine versus saline placebo ROSC occurred in 19% of patients in the calcium groups versus 27% in saline placebo group No magic drugs in cardiac arrest, good CPR and early defibrillation are still the most important factors for ROSC in cardiac arrest  References
    Vallentin MF, Granfeldt A, Meilandt C, et al. Effect of Intravenous or Intraosseous Calcium vs Saline on Return of Spontaneous Circulation in Adults With Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA. 2021;326(22):2268-2276. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.20929
    Summarized by John Spartz, MS4 | Edited by Erik Verzemnieks, MD
     
    The Emergency Medical Minute is excited to announce that we are now offering AMA PRA Category 1 credits™ via online course modules. To access these and for more information, visit our website at https://emergencymedicalminute.org/cme-courses/ and create an account. 
    Donate to EMM today!

    • 2 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
7 Ratings

7 Ratings

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